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True20 Adventure Roleplaying $17.50
Average Rating:4.5 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
6 22
4 15
2 1
0 1
0 0
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
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True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by A. A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/25/2013 21:42:03
A very good system. This is a hidden treasure among RPGs. Steve Kenson has taken the d20 system and boiled it down to its essentials in an easy to follow system that doesn't take away time from the gaming table to look up cumbersome rules. No more keeping track of hit points or spell slots. For those who are familiar with the d20 system, but wanted something more streamlined, this is the perfect product. The best part is that it works with any setting. Whether you're preferred genre is space ninjas or post apocalyptic cowboys vs. leather clad bikers, this system has you covered. The reason for 4/5 is because the system is still level dependent, and could have included a point build option. The very best part in my opinion is that you only need 1d20 to resolve everything.

True20 delivers a flexible system with nigh limitless possibilities. The game mechanics are solid and the flow of gameplay is unparalleled. A must have for any serious RPG fanatic.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Michael K. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/20/2009 11:44:01
True20 is a streamlined, slimed down version of d20 that I think exceeds at providing all the good things you liked about OGL without the excess baggage. The game has only three classes (called roles) and really doesn't need any more, and most things that would be class features are now feats. Magic works like superpowers in Mutants & Masterminds and is pretty open to customization. This particular version (the original) has a section at the back containing sample settings none of which really caught my eye. The newer version has replaced these with the True20 Companion. I recommend that version instead if you just getting into True20.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Ian D. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/28/2009 15:52:39
A great generic rule system that allows you play any type of RPG game - from modern to the most bizarre of fantasies. It's minimal dependency on accessories and sourcebooks or additional rules make it really cheap on the wallet too.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Si M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/15/2008 00:16:38
The product was great the content was a bit lame. I was expecting better as I already had purchased the Hard copy of Rose

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Dean L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/17/2008 09:00:22
I can only say this. All RPG systems should be like this. I'm an advocate of flexibilty and adaptabilty. This game has it in spades with a few aces to spare. It has made all my dreams come true I will be buying a good nuber of the products that come out for this game. I been gaming now for 30 years and ths takes me back to the days when gaming was great. A good solid frame work, with just enough inspiration set the imgaination fire. The setting that came with this book are awesome frame works also. I've purchased World's of Adventure and few other items so far...reviews coming soon

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 07/20/2007 09:55:24
An RPG Resource Review:

The idea behind True20 is to provide a streamlined and simple ruleset that does not intrude into role-playing, but serves to facilitate it. Based on the core D20 mechanic, and published under the Open Gaming Licence, the fundemental idea is that a single roll of a D20 is all that you require to see if your character can do, well, whatever AND to discover the results of that action.

The Foreword gives a spot of history, the ruleset now presented was originally developed for the 'romantic fantasy' game Blue Rose on the grounds that many people who'd like to play that sort of game would be deterred by the heavy-duty rules-heavy nature of games like Dungeons & Dragons. While Green Ronin had intended to use the system elsewhere, they did not originally envisage a generic ruleset... until they heard what a wide range of games people were already using it for! And so a setting-independent ruleset came about.

Next, the Introduction begins with a fairly standard 'What is roleplaying?' piece, and then launches into the basics of how this particular ruleset works. Each character is defined by his Abilities (strength, intelligence and such like), his Role (3 core ones of adept, expert or warrior), his Skills and his Feats - all of which contribute positive or negative modifiers to apply to a single D20 roll against a Difficulty set by the Narrator (GM) based on what the character is trying to do. That's it. The rest of the chapter goes on to discuss the different situations in which you might want to roll, and what modifiers might apply depending on whether you are rushed or taking your time, will it be disasterous if you fail (you really, really want to succeed at defusing bombs, for example!) and the like.

Chapter 1 deals with Character Creation. A point allocation system, rather than die-rolling, is used so that you can build a character according to your vision of what he's like. Everything is explained clearly, so that you know what the consequences of your choices will be. A system of 'backgrounds' can be used to influence the effect of anything from a character's upbringing to his species, giving a collection of balanced advantages and disadvantages to the basic outline. An interesting feature is the concept of Role. Rather than having an array of character classes, like standard D20 games, the character is either an Adept, an Expert or a Warrior - his strength being in supernatural powers, skill use or combat respectively. This influences the skills and feats you choose later on. You can also round out a character by describing appearance, age, gender and selecting a virtue and a vice for him. Next the Conviction system is introduced - this reflects the determination that makes a character a 'hero' rather than your everyday sort of fellow, and is a pool of extra points that can be used to sway things in your direction at a critical point - like Spycraft Action Dice and similar mechanics.

Chapter 2 looks at Skills. They are used in the conventional manner of having 'ranks' in chosen skills which, along with the appropriate ability modifier, are combined with a D20 roll to see how well you did. As explained in the previous chapter, you get a certain number of ranks to begin with (depending on Role and intelligence of the character), and with each increase in level you get a few more to spend. Each skill listed comes with details of what it applies to and how it can be used. Some - like knowledge or perform - need you to specify to what they apply.

Next, Chapter 3 gives a similar treatment to Feats. These are defined as special abilities which a player character might have, but which are not usually available to ordinary people. They may provide a special gift or talent, and can be used to customise your character's capabilities. You start with a set number chosen from a general list or a subset dependent on your Role, and add more as you rise in level.

Chapter 4 then looks at Supernatural Powers. For a character with the Adept Role, these can be obtained in the same way as Feats. The definition is broad: these Powers might be magical spells or divinely-bestowed abilities, or powers of the mind. Or something completely different like a hacker in a virtual reality world. When using a Power, a bonus based on Adept rank +3 and the controlling ability modifier is added to the D20 roll. Some Powers are tiring to use, and the Adept has to guard against becoming too fatigued. It's all left quite vague - deliberately so, as the nature of Powers available will depend on the setting in which you play.

Next comes Chapter 5: Equipment. As well as actual gear, it also looks at wealth and spending in general. A character has a basic Wealth score, which is compared against the value of whatever he wants to buy - a neat abstraction for those who do not want to keep track of cash, but which can take away one of the main motivators for adventuring - getting loot so that you can buy more stuff! When it gets to weapons, you get the usual descriptions you would expect, except that damage is presented as a modifier rather than a die type or number of points. This hooks in to the combat system, which is one of the main differences between this ruleset and standard D20 systems.

And so on to Chapter 6: Playing the Game. It's all about providing the mechanics to enable characters to actually do things. Starting with Physical Actions, which looks at movement and speed and pushing yourself beyond normal limits, and then Social Actions, whether you are just getting along or trying to manipulate the situation to your own ends, and thence on to Fighting. Combat involves a roll of your Attack against your target's Defence, each with a collection of bonuses based on Role and level and other factors. But you always miss on a 1 and hit on a natural 20, irrespective of bonuses or what the other fellow's Defence happens to be. Fairly normal so far... until an attack connects. Rather than the attacker rolling damage, the target rolls against his Toughness, with the Difficulty including the weapon's damage bonus... success means no damage is taken, but if the roll is less than the Difficulty damage is taken depending on how far below it was. Rather than deducting 'hit points' though, the target becomes bruised or disabled or some other descriptor based on how badly the roll was missed and whether the potential damage was lethal or subdual. It sounds more complex than it is once you start brawling. Naturally, the next part of the chapter looks at recovery and healing, before rounding out with a discussion of environmental hazards and their effects.

Chapter 7: Narrating the Game looks at the role of the Narrator (Game Master). This starts off with the crux of the matter, if you have grasped the core mechanic of D20 roll + appropriate modifiers against a Difficulty, then it does not matter what characters are trying to do, you can make it happen (or not). It's fine if you want to go into extra detail and use more complex rules, but there is no need to do so. It is good to see this stated openly, although I am sure that I am not the only GM who has been doing similar 'rules-light' abstractions for years!

A few times, mention has been made about characters gaining 'levels' and now it is revealed how - it's when the Narrator decides. No calculating XP totals and keeping track of them... it is up to the Narrator to decide when a character (or even the whole group) have done enough to level up. The rest of the Narrator chapter looks at some of the ways you can use the rules mechanics to make the game enjoyable, fast and fun... and it's probably something all Game Masters need to read even if this is not their chosen system. Get to the core of your chosen mechanic, and be ready to abstract as and when necessary so that the flow of the game is not impeded... of course, this system is designed with this aim in mind, but many of the concepts are transferrable to other rulesets if that's the sort of game you want.

Chapter 8: Adversaries provides some sample opponents for your characters. It begins by considering Narrator characters from the main villain to minions and ordinary bystanders, before going on to look at the more conventional 'monster' concept. They are all presented in fairly broad template form, but there are so many monster books out there that finding some good ones is a trivial task, just pare down the statistics to suit this ruleset. The chapter ends with a bestiary, some are common creatures which might turn up in any setting, fantasy or otherwise; while others are genuine monsters.

Just over half-way through the book, and that's the ruleset done and dusted. The rest is 'Worlds of Adventure' - four settings specifically designed (as the result of a competition) to be used with the True20 system. What is of interest is that each customises the ruleset to some level, adding and modifying as necessary to create the right alternate reality while retaining the core mechanics. The four settings - each from a different publisher - are Caliphate Nights (Paradigm Concepts), Lux Aeternum (BlackWyrm Games), Mecha vs. Kaiju (Big Finger Games) and Borrowed Time (Electric Mulch); and there is also mention of the Blue Rose RPG, Damnation Decade and True20 Worlds of Adventure, all published by Green Ronin.

Caliphate Nights is classic fantasy adventuring in the kind of world portrayed in One Thousand Nights and a Night, the mythical Arabia full of djinn and high adventure. After explaining the roots of the setting in traditional Arabic and Indian literature, rather than Hollywood movies, this section goes on to present the background of the setting: its history, society, religion, culture and geography. It's refreshing to read a piece on Arabia written by someone who understands something of Islam - for understanding the development of Islam is core to getting into this alternate reality of a fantastic Arabia. However, this moves seamlessly into the imagined history of the rise of a mad Caliph that forms the contemporary background of the setting.

Background explained, we move on to how characters will work within this setting. Based on the core Roles, several Archetypes are available for you to choose from - so Adepts may be astrologers, or elementalists or sha'ir (djinn-summoners0 and the like; and the same for the other Roles. For each, appropriate Feats and Skills are suggested and there is a wide selection of new Feats - how about Grooming, which confers the ability to make others look their best? Essential if you are a Barber... New Powers are also provided for Adepts to master. There are also some interesting ways of using Conviction to enhance the storytelling aspects of the game, for example you can tell a story within the overall game to explore a particular point, with the player who came up with the idea taking over as Narrator for a brief while and everyone else taking roles in this tale. Strange, but somehow fitting within this alternate reality.

Next are some notes for the Narrator. Notes on pace and setting the scene, ideas for some areas in which conflict and adventure can be found - and a list of 20 adventure ideas to start you off. Suitable monsters, and notes and game mechanics for the making and granting of wishes round this off. A good working familiarity with Arabian - and perhaps Indian or even Chinese - folklore and legend will be an advantage if you want to run this setting, you should at the very least read One Thousand Nights and A Night.

Lux Aeturnum is a swashbuckling spacefaring alternate reality. Take 17th century piratical attitudes and mix in some spaceships and sorcery and get cinematic. There's a lot going on, of course, but no deep background is required. A handful of different races have congregated in a small cluster of star systems, brought there by a strangely benevolent elder race who have banned weapons of mass destruction or even ones which kill indiscriminately - hence swords have become popular again. Of course, there is a lot going on, a swirling melee of intrigue and opportunism for characters to get involved with. Rule mechanics are quite light, as befits the cinematic feel, with a note that those looking to run combat between starships will do best to stick to abstraction and narrative, if they want more detail the best route will be to adapt another game's starship combat rules. Naturally, you do find out how to create characters from the various species around, but that's about it.

Next comes Mecha vs. Kaiju. This setting is Japanese pop culture, humans piloting giant war machines (mecha) in combat against horribly-mutated radioactive monsters (kaiju). Think of the TV series Power Rangers, Godzilla movies and anime. Oh, and if you get bored thumping monsters, there's a massive conspiracy against civilisation as you know it to combat during down-time from piloting your mecha. The whole setting can be summed up in one page, then on to character creation. Mecha pilots are the best of the best, so you get 10 points rather than the core rules 6 to enhance your abilities. While Roles stay as the core Adept, Expert and Warrior; you then choose an Archetype which brings a virtue, a vice and a whole way of looking at things to define your character. Then there's a whole bunch of Feats - a lot, of course, devoted to mecha piloting, but there's plenty more besides. Next come the mecha themselves and their weapon and other systems; and rule mechanics for mecha movement and combat. Next the opposition, all you need to run effective kaiju monsters. The section ends with adventure ideas and plot hooks to get you going.

Finally, we have Borrowed Time. It's more a concept than a setting - the idea that while time normally flows past to future one second at a time, certain individuals collect 'pockets' of spare time and use them to influence events. You can make this the core of your adventures, or use these concepts to link several diverse settings which your characters can transfer between... endless possibilities here.

Game mechanics follow: time manipulation Feats, of course, and the mechanics for speeding or slowing time - thus enabling you to do something you would not otherwise be able to do. Next come a collection of 'Factions' - groups and individuals involved in this fiddling with time, who may be allies or enemies - or competitors. One might even be the group to which the characters belong. Then there's advice on actually playing this game, which is intended for a high action style. It's excellent advice and worth reading even if you don't want to use this setting or even use a full-blown high action style... although the final bit on 'being stylish' seems to equate style with popular fashion - one quick look around my students demonstrates that dressing in the height of fashion often completely lacks style!

The book rounds out with notes on converting 'standard' D20 materials for use with the True20 game mechanic. Very useful if you desire the flexibility of this system but want to use background from other games.

Overall, this is a splendid set of game mechanics. For me, its main advantage is the free-flowing approach to rules, ensuring that they do not intrude on the actual role-playing. A second major advantage is the versitility - by making the core rules particularly for character creation extremely broad and inclusive, it is easy to refine them to suit a particular alternate reality of your choice - especially if you like to draw on your favourite fantasy novels... you can create characters that fit precisely rather than try to shoehorn standard D20 classes into the setting, as you are given the tools to write roles according to your needs.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Josh B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/29/2007 00:00:00
An intrestingly freeform take on the d20 system. As a GM it does require a bit of work on the front end to sucessfully make it happen, but it can be well worth the effort.




LIKED: Simplicity

DISLIKED: The experience system is basically "when the GM tells you to, level your character"
As a player i do prefer some more concrete evidence of my progress.

QUALITY: Acceptable

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Lee L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/07/2007 00:00:00
This is the best RPG system that has come out of the OGL.


LIKED: Simplified d20!

DISLIKED: Wealth system is a little out of my preferance.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Nicholas B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/18/2006 00:00:00
Cool D20 Redux. Useful for those who like D20 but wish for somewhat less complexity, or those who want a fairly basic but flexible game system for use in a variety of genres. It reduces the system to three classes, a more comprehensive skill set, and simplifies feats and combat. The magic/powers system is possibly the best part of the game, and adds a unique and innovative flair to what I consider the most rehashed element of other D20 games.


LIKED: Well organized and presented, another Green Ronin classic. It's the first real effort at a multi-genre generic D20 game I can recall, one which should in theory be able to do far future and distant past equally well. The supernatural powers system is unique and a breath of fresh air. The combat system makes combat deadly an more even at all levels of play.

DISLIKED: I don't think True20 handles sci fi as well as it does more supernaturally themed genres without some work. It is also not as suited to superheroics, as MnM is probably intended for that, so it's not really that generic. Also, the numbers in this game, while keeping it simple, can often create very slight differences from one character to the next. Finally, I really dislike the experience system: there is none. Players like rewards, and this game favors the more "feel good GM grants you a level" approach.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Christopher N. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/17/2006 00:00:00
Finally, an D20-style RPG I actually would run! Much easier mechanics, fast combat, and plenty of flexibility in a neat and tidy package. This is what 3rd Edition should have been.


LIKED: Flexibility and fast play. Also, this PDF is extensively bookmarked and has a great INDEX!

DISLIKED: Well, they could've chucked the three "roles" and gone totally classless, but that's a minor issue. The sample settings are okay but unnecessary (I didn't print them).

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Andy S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/19/2006 00:00:00
Superb multi-genre rules system which covers the same territory as D&D, d20 Modern, and bits of d20 Future in one rulebook. It achieves this by compressing the rules for all of them down to a minimum. This is very likely to supercede all other RPG rules sets I use for my various campaigns. Be warned though: The revised damage and magic systems mean that this plays quite differently from D&D. Characters who advance in levels gain BAB, feats and skills much as normal, but their hit points don't change much. While this makes it easier to integrate mixed-level parties, and means you don't need (for example) 17 different versions of orcs, it does mean there will be few "combat gods". The system also stresses characters rather than their equipment, as there is little in the way of magic items.


LIKED: Simple, fast-playing and elegant rules. Clever use of saving throws to eliminate hit points and spell slots. Conversion guidelines to allow use of other d20 system products for monsters, equipment etc.

DISLIKED: No complaints. As a stand-alone book it lacks monsters and treasure, but the conversion guidelines appendix addresses this by allowing the GM to draw on the extensive ranges in other products.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Nathan C. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/04/2006 00:00:00
True d20 a variation of the tradition al d20 system that allows players and dungeon masters to escape the structured cage of the core books in lue of a simplistic version. Despite its stripped down feel, True 20 offers the most control one will have over a campaign world or character since the days of Advanced Dungeons and Dragons.

At last year?s Gencon, I had the pleasure of playing in a Mutants and Masterminds game ran by Steve Kenson. I walked away incredibly impressed with the system and wishing there was a fantasy version of the game. True 20 is that fantasy version. This same fantasy version was revealed in the Blue Rose campaign setting released earlier last year, but the revision released this year gives True 20 its proper due.

For the Players:

The first part of this PDF showcases the effortless character creation . Instead of selecting races, classes, prestige classes, skills, feats and spells while indulging in much more math than your average fourth grade class, you need only select your abilities (no rolling, just use your allotted 10 points, pick one of three roles (similar to classes), choose what skills you specialize in (no issuing out ranks), chose a couple of feats and select whatever powers you wish. The entire process is math free.

Even if you are a crunch freak, you will like the simplistic class system. The fighter, the adventurer and the mage. From there you can build powers and abilities around them to recreate any published class or prestige class.

Another huge plus is reducing all rolls to a simple d20. Instead of playing with your assortment of dice, you only need one polyhedron to handle skill and combat rolls. There is no tracking hit point either. Players either suffer one of 6 categories of Damage depending on how badly the defending player rolled on a Toughness saving throw.

For the Dungeon Master :
True 20 is a system that allows DMs to focus on elaborate stories and quick combat. I have yet to have a combat in True 20 last longer than 25 minutes--- and that was the boss battle. To handle XP, true 20 puts the objective of leveling in the hands of the DM. Whenever you feel a level has been gained you assign the level.

True 20 is also quite expansive. The book includes stats for fantasy elements as well as modern and future. If you are feeling frisky you can attempt to build a time-hybrid campaign world. If not, do not worry. The book gives you a preview of the four published settings already in the market. All of which provide a unique flavor and game. My pick would be Tales of Caliphate.

If you already have a d20 game and want to venture into the world of True 20, there's an appendage that shows you how to convert everything over. Again, the math is reduced to a minimum. 9 times out of 10, if I try to incorporate a new system, I find myself winging most of it if I have to do large amounts of math to port over a goblin. Not the case in True 20 where the only thing you really need to do to port over d20 products is to convert the hit points to Toughness Saves.

The Iron Word
This game gave me the feel I had when I first began gaming and didn?t know anything about AofO or 5 foot stepping. Not to say that tactical combat is not great, but its not for everyone. If you have players irking for a more abstract system based on D20, True 20 is for you. I recommend that every new DM begin with this system before moving on to the more complex d20.



LIKED: This is a simplistic version of d20 that pushes the role playnig element without bogging down on the tactical elements.

DISLIKED: The action can be so fast, I find myself having to prepare more material the sessions I"ve run.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Kevin T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/05/2006 00:00:00
Having avoided D&D since the "red books," I was pretty interested in 3e and 3.5. However, they left me very frustrated as a good system was buried under needless complexity and number crunching. T20, on the other hand, is a completely different beast. This is what d20 should have been. My afforementioned 3.5 books have never been used. My T20 book has never been put down as I feverishly plot my new campaign.

T20 is essentially a streamlined d20 variant. The only dice required is the good 'ole d20. Any readers/players of d20 rules will be instantly at home, not to say that new players won't - they will find the book concise, lucid and direct (unlike most d20 incarnations). Some of the best changes comes to the damage system. Gone are fighters who have excessive HP, in it's place is a new save role: Toughness. Passing means a glancing blow, failure results in movement on a damage tracker, dependent on degree of failure. This is just one example of how they have streamlined things. Classes? 3 and only 3. Yet all potential character types can be covered with this system. There is much to like about this product, and you can't help but smile as you read.




LIKED: - New damage rules
- Character creation
- Versatility making the rules truly generic
- Too much to cover here, buy it and see!

DISLIKED: - The artwork preceeding each chapter is very weak

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied

[THIS REVIEW WAS EDITED]


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Benjamin T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/03/2006 00:00:00
I'm surprised to not see any new reviews since GR released the revised edition. As I did not purchase that version (although I own Blue Rose), I will stick to what I see in the current edition and leave to others to make comparisons.

First the art - I've got to say that Kent Burles does a wicked version of channelling Jack Kirby (comic artist god) into the first half of the book. Every section prior to the campaign settings start off with his work, and just one look at page 4 (inset to introduction) makes me want to seek him out and get him to commission work for me! Other artists range from excellent to somewhat dissappointing (mostly in the campaign sections).

The rules - if you're looking here you should probably have checked out the Green Ronin site and especially their boards. The book is a stripped down version of D20, and the overall feeling you get from the rules is that it's something for a DM to build on. Think D&D 3.5 is a good start but has too much? Look here.

The campaigns - good for helping you see how you can use the rules in a variety of settings. While being fleshed out, GR's intention is to give you an idea of what T20 is capable of. If you like any of these settings, campaign books are promised in the near future.


LIKED: Art. Basic set of core rules to build on. Feeling that you can bring a lot of other d20 supplements into your game with just a little tweaking.

DISLIKED: Advesary and Supernatural Powers sections were weak. Both will be addressed by GR soon though.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
True20 Adventure Roleplaying
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Jay C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/01/2006 00:00:00
A very interesting, streamlined approach to d20. The presentation is very minimal, with no artwork whatso ever, but I didn't consider that a negative for this type of rules book.


LIKED: I like the streamlined skills, ability scores, and class abilities.

DISLIKED: The change to the damage system is the most radical change, and hardest for me to judge. I'm not saying I don't like it, but I'd have to playtest it for a while to really made a judgement. Same goes for the magic system.

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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