RPGNow.com
Narrow Results













Back
Bushido $19.95 $10.00
Average Rating:4.6 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
2 4
2 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
Bushido
Click to view
Bushido
Publisher: Fantasy Games Unlimited
by Ronald W. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/27/2009 09:27:58

What can I say? This is a classic. The game system will be familiar to anyone who has played aftermath! or Daredevils.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Bushido
Publisher: Fantasy Games Unlimited
by Barry B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/21/2006 20:22:07

I played Bushido back in the 80’s and loved it. As the other reviewers have noted the layout of the books is not great, but once you learn to navigate the content you will find one of the best RPGs ever written. The mechanics are complex, but they did force players out of the trad D&D thud n’blunder mind-set and forced them to consider a more rounded vision of Japanese culture.

This was the first game I saw where you could gain as much advantage through a well composed haiku as walloping someone with a sword, peasants HAD to be humble around their social superiors or get their heads chopped off and personal honour created genuine dilemmas for players. I have not seen any of the more modern Samurai role playing games, but I doubt they have improved on this marvellous game.

One warning, the PDF is not clear in places and they have left out the crucial encounter tables and critical hit and fumble tables from the DM's screen.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Bushido
Publisher: Fantasy Games Unlimited
by Brandon S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/23/2005 10:39:36

Bushido is a game that I was aware of in the 80's when I was playing Ad&D and TMNT RPG. I was curious about it but never bought it or played it. So I decided to download it and try it out.

The bottom line is this, Bushido is an awesome game. There is a certain nostolgic appeal to this game. I have read the book but have yet to play it. I have made two characters a Yakuza and Budoka.

I feel that this game is a refreshing change from this current trend of glossy art and 1,000 sourcebooks. Bushido is not a munchkin or power gamer's game. It is a game that forces it's players to think about creating a complex character to adventure in a complex society.

This game is not without it's faults. It is set up in a confusing layout. There are no chapters and some of the rules seem out of place. The type is very small and the artwork is not the best.

All this being said though I have overlooked these flaws. I just wish the FGU would get there act together and get this game revised. I do not feel that this game should be given a third edition, just a revision.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Bushido
Publisher: Fantasy Games Unlimited
by Lawrence W. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/21/2004 10:52:47

Bushido is the seminal 'Samurai' RPG by FGU.

FGU is noted for its attention to detail and the somewhat complex systems used to simulate its subject matter. Bushido is no exception, and its core system is detailed, complex, and not for the novice GM. It does, however, provide a solid base for the background, and its attention to detail covers everything from the caste and position of birth through to mass combat and what happens to characters in those 'down-times' when not adventuring.

The system is a points-based mechanic, with characters enjoying bonuses to their base statistics (Strength, Health, Speed, Deftness Wit and Will) depending on the profession - or class - they choose. This distinguishes them as 'classic' heros or characters, rather than as average characters. Once base stats are decided, there's a barrage of calculated secondary statistics covering things such as how quickly one learns new skills, how many actions one can accomplish in an action round, and how well one concentrates to improve performance ('Zanshin').

Skills derive from stats and are intially calculated on a range from 1 to 100+. However, resolution of most activities, including combat, is handled on a d20, with the skill value being divided by 5 to yield a 'raw' chance of success. This raw chance is subject to further modifiers to provide a 'Base' chance, reflecting such things as character level (there is a maximum of 6th level), and situational modifiers.

As such the system is reasonably simple to understand, if a little fiddly at administer, and study of the rules eventually clarifies the way the system works. Additional ideas include 'effect numbers' which determine differing degrees of success, and 'intensities' used for things such as poisons and magical effects.

The rules are NOT well structured. Concepts and definitions are introduced before they are fully explained, so expect some head-scratching as one works through character generation. But, with perserverance, the rules do make sense and are suprisingly logical when play gets under way.

A mechanic to note is the advancement system. Characters advance in 3 seperate ways: in Level, which is based on gathering experience points (either Budo, if a warrior, or shugendo, if a magician or priest); skill points, based on training and learning through skill use; and 'honour' or 'On' which reflects reputation and personal integrity. On can be lost - and if sufficient On is lost to create a significant loss of integrity, then seppuku, or ritual suicide, might be the only honourable course of action open to the character.

So the rules aren't for beginners, but they are comprehensive. However, where Bushido really shines is in conveying the Japanese background. One gains a real sense of place, despite the fact that Bushido never sets out the background to 'Nippon' in explicit and exhaustive detail. Concepts like birth status, honour, martial competence and other, traditional Samurai conceits, are conveyed gently and persuasively. By the time you have created your first character, you'll know what place he or she occupies in society, his or her relationship to a lord (or not, depending on birth), and what's expected. You'll know how much they earn for serving a master, and what equipment they get for the privilege. It's subtle, complex and involving stuff, and a refreshing change for the tendency to swamp GMs and players with expansive background detail that can't be used to its best extent during play.

A good example is the handling of the two major religions: Shinto and Buddhism. Both co-exist, although they are different philosophies. Shinto is animist in approach, investing every natural feature or event with a spirit and wisdom of its own. Buddhism is based upon enlightenment and study, with the cycle of being at the heart of the ethos. However, both religions provide enough detail to allow you to create a character that is immersed in the chosen religion. You really do gain a sense of faith and what its responsibilities are, rather than simply creating a warrior that wields a holy symbol.

There's lots more to be said about Bushido, but space and time don't permit it. I will conclude with the following points:

  1. If you want a detailed, simulationist RPG, then Bushido ranks amongst the best

  2. Its attention to detail and setting are first rate, and the best of the Samurai games available

  3. Everything you need to run a campaign is present in the rules books - you don't need countless supplements

  4. Not for beginners, or those who like 'system-lite' games, but definitely rewarding if you persevere with the (sometimes) confusing layout and structure.

  5. Bushido's system is innovative, and was used as the basis for two other excellent FGU games, 'Aftermath' (which takes the complexity to the absolute extreme) and 'Daredevils' (where it's significantly streamlined.

And, at the price offered here, it's superb value for money.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Displaying 1 to 4 (of 4 reviews) Result Pages:  1 
Back
You must be logged in to rate this
0 items
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DrivethruRPG