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    The Colonial Gothic Book Collection [BUNDLE]
    by Jeffery S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/10/2021 23:31:19

    This is based solely on the appearance and quality of the print books. I have not yet had time to do a deep-dive into the rules (14 books at once!), although a quick glance looks promising.

    I admit I was hesitant to purchase this after seeing a one star review based on the physical quality of the books. I received mine in a timely manner in good shape. The binding does not obscure the print in any of my books as the other customer stated. The books themselves are lovely. My only complaint is the thin paper, but overall amazing and I reccomend this bundle to anyone interested in the Colonial Gothic rpg.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    The Colonial Gothic Book Collection [BUNDLE]
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    The Colonial Gothic Book Collection [BUNDLE]
    by Robert M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/02/2020 18:41:19

    This is a review on the quality of the print on demand material. Some of the print on demand books have little or no margin. The binding obscures the print. Half the books are very difficult to read due to this. The issue is obvious if you just scroll through the PDF's which are NOT included if you buy the PoD bundle. Save your money on the PoD material if you want this game, get the PDF's and print it out yourself.



    Rating:
    [1 of 5 Stars!]
    Fairyland
    by Jarrod G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/19/2020 20:58:07

    After a half-dozen games using Fairyland, I can say a few different things. The first thing is it is gorgeous. This is a fairytale book, through and through. I love the print of it, I love the paper, I love the size and everything about the vibrant illustrations. However, there is a drawback, the character sheet is honestly a nightmare to print. It needs a digital version that is easier to work with and is printer-friendly. Second is that it is easy to read the book, and easy to pick-up and play. The third is that imagination is key.

    I found that playing to the system’s strength is to let your imagination run as wild as possible. Both the players and the GM need to understand that nearly anything is possible in this setting. The first couple games I GM' ed for were fun, but seemed rather stale as we found it difficult where the abilities ended and began. Due to my experience with Colonial Gothic, for which I love, I saw the similarities and was able to adapt. But the other players found the system felt too undefined.

    My wife and I played several games just the two of us, though and once we realized that this is meant for the players around the table to try to think creatively how to best situations, the better.

    I took Jo through a one-shot based almost 100% off of the Giant Troll moment in The Hobbit by Tolkein. She had never read or watched the movies, which made this fairly interesting. She snuck around as her tiny little child character and stole some muttons from the trolls and got caught as she was leaving. She tried at first to attack but quickly found that not working.

    The encounter ended with her succeeding to argue if humans were jam-filled or not. It was a great hoot, and because she was a Rascal and not a Fighter or friend maker, this made a great deal of sense.

    Overall, I say that this has a lot of depth to it, but it's quite emergent. I think this is a great entry into the RPG scene, much better than any other I've seen, to be honest. DND is far too complicated getting into for the first time.

    The biggest benefit to this, as I see it, is a great introduction to Rogue Game's 12 Degree philosophy. This has Richard Iorio II's style and DNA is woven throughout. It is so wonderful to be able to read this book from cover to cover. It doesn't feel like a soulless textbook. It is written by a designer that does give a damn about this product.

    In the end, I highly recommend Fairyland to anybody. This is great to use as an intro to playing or running TTRPG's. You can use it for your first grade aged children as well. I'm having a blast experimenting with this and I hope everyone gets a chance at this.

    Additional Edits

    So, one thing I would like to point out to anybody that is looking at this: Fairyland is true whimsy. If you are looking for a system with an extremely in-depth number crunching, this is not for you. You will be very sorely disappointed. When going into this or, honestly, any of Rogue Games works looking for extremely mechanical depth, then you are looking at the wrong place. This is a system that provides a loose structure for your imagination to flow freely. This is probably the most freeform story-driven system I've found. This is a true pick up and plays the system. It's not overladen with 'How do you's" but instead really takes you through the "What can I think of's?"

    Again, my only issue with this system is the character sheet, it isn't the worst I've worked with, but honestly, it needs a printer friendly version.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Fairyland
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    Colonial Gothic Rulebook 3rd Edition
    by Mr B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/21/2017 13:22:28

    Wow - got this very cheaply via the bundle of holding deal. Have only started reading the background information on the colonies, but it is very informative and well written. The system seems solid too.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic Rulebook 3rd Edition
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    Colonial Gothic: Rulebook Second Edition
    by Robert F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/18/2016 20:44:50

    I actually really like this setting and system, it's very unique in its execution of character building and advancement. There are a few major typo's here and there such as the 45 a tribute points and the constant reference to willpower strength and dexterity as atributes(which is why I rated it 4 instead of 5) but otherwise I am very pleased with this game so far. I do hope rules for mechanical invention could be added at some point, so that players could design such things as the Turtle submarine and such, but one can only hope.



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic: Rulebook Second Edition
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    Colonial Gothic: The Grimoire
    by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2014 14:39:03

    This is an expanded and updated version of the older Colonial Gothic: Witchcraft book and the Colonial Gothic: Secrets book. Both of which are out of print. It also has plenty of new material as well. Chapter 1 covers new spells, Common and Arcane. The advantage of adding new spells to this game is one can easily say that the knowledge was just rediscovered. Some new book sent from overseas, an old book in the collection of a wealthy man or any other contrivance. There are quite a few new spells here to be honest. Chapter 2 follows with a discussion on spell books. Their uses and how to get them. A few sample books are also included. Chapter 3 introduces magical talismans to the game. Sort of Spell storing or keeping magical power. Not a lot here, but plenty of ideas. Chapter 4 covers the related chapter of relics, items that have magical ability to them due to divine providence or some other happenstance.
    Chapter 5 is dedicated to Witchcraft. Like the book it replaces, there are no rules for playing "good" witches. Fitting with the times all witches are assumed to be evil. Personally I would like to see a good witch, but I can make due. Likewise Chapter 6 deals with occult items such as cold iron and holy water. Finally Chapter 7 deals with new magical creatures. There is quite a Lovecraftian feel to this one. Not generic "Lovecraft" but actual monsters from his mythos. There is an appendix with the Create Talisman and Witchcraft skills. There is also a combined magical index of spells between this book and the Colonial Gothic core.

    A must have if you are using a lot of magic in your games.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic: The Grimoire
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    Colonial Gothic: Gazetteer
    by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2014 14:19:04

    This book calls itself a Gazetteer, but "Campaign Sourcebook" might be more appropriate. Written for the 1st Edition of Colonial Gothic it works just fine under 2nd Edition. Chapter 1 covers the history of the colonies from early English and Dutch colonization right on up to 1775. Principle wars are discussed and colonial growth covered. Chapters 2 through 14 cover the original 13 colonies in detail including basic demographics and major towns. Points of interest are also featured in each chapter as well as anything out of the ordinary. Chapter 15 is devoted to the Native American people. An overview of their history and cultures is given, but by necessity it is short. In truth an entire Colonial Gothic book could be done just on the various Native american tribes and nations. Te last chapter is a ready to run adventure, "A Surprise for General Gage". There are two Appendices. First a Glossary and then a Bibliography. I want to take a moment to point out that all of the Colonial Gothic books always feature a very robust (for a game book) bibliography. This one is no exception to that rule. This one includes books, game books and even some online resources. Certainly worth your time to investigate a few of these.



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic: Gazetteer
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    Colonial Gothic: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
    by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2014 13:38:22

    This is a great little book to be honest. The first half is the story of Sleepy Hollow and the second half is how to use it in your Colonial Gothic Game. The geography of Sleepy Hollow, the Hudson and the Tapan Zee are discussed as well as Sleepy Hollow's role in history. It reads like a small campaign guide. This book is not very big, nor does it cost very much, but it is certainly punching above it's weight class in terms of content.



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
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    Colonial Gothic Bestiary
    by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2014 13:32:34

    I have said it many times. You can never have too many monsters. The Colonial Gothic Bestiary satisfies that craving and then some. At 110 pages it is full of monsters and many are illustrated. The artwork varies. Personally I am a fan of the older wood cut images, but I know those are are difficult to find perfect representations of various beasts. The monsters themselves are a varied lot; some local monsters like the Jersey Devil and some "from back home" like the Gargoyle and Gorgon. I think this is a good mix, but I am more fond of the local fauna than something I can find in any book. I do have one nitpick (ok maybe two), first there is no Piasa Bird. A local legend from here in Illinois that I am surprised didn't make the cut. Supposedly the first mention of it is in 1673 (or the 1920s), Sure Illinois is way away from the Colonies. Though it was a very nearly a full state (1818) by the end point of the game, The War of 1812. The other was that the Chupacabra was included. The Chupa, for all it's fun, is squarely a 20th century invention. But these are only nitpicks, not criticisms. There are plenty of American Indian monsters too that could have been included. Some like a naaldlooshii would be good too (I know, Navajo and not near the Colonies...). Maybe A Bestiary 2 is in the works.
    The indexes in back are quite useful since they also include creatures from the core rule books. Lots of great creatures here and fully worth the price.



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic Bestiary
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    Colonial Gothic: The Player Companion
    by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2014 13:09:41

    This is the newest book (as of this writing) to the Colonial Gothic line. Mostly though this is related to the cover. As the title suggests this is a set of options for players of the Colonial Gothic game. We get a list of new skills and some additions to old skills. Normally I prefer it when a game reuses old skills in new ways, esp. point buy games where the budget per skill is not likely to change. After all Character A created with the Core has the same 45 points as Character B created with this book. In this case though it works both thematically and systematically. Chapter Two covers Advantages and Disadvantages. Characters are given 4 points to buy advantages and can also take disadvantages. Works pretty much like other systems in that respect, save there are not pages and pages of them (like for example GURPS). Most in fact are story related and can be used in conjunction with the character's Background. Chapter Three covers family and social status. A must have really for playing in this age. Chapter Four has a bunch of character templates. So if you want to play a Native Shaman or emulate your Assassin's Creed character then this is a great place to start. Chapter Five details more combat options and how to use them. Think of these as advanced combat skills. Chapter Six has more magic including Counter-Spelling and more Common and Arcane Spells. Chapter Seven has more equipment. All in all worthy, but not really required additions to the game. It is one of the books that if you don't know about it, you won't miss it, but if you do then you will wonder how you got on with out it.
    If there is a 3rd Edition of Colonial Gothic then a lot of these rules should be folded into the main core rules.



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic: The Player Companion
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    Colonial Gothic: Rulebook Second Edition
    by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2014 10:29:13

    The best thing about this book right out of the gate is it compatible with the older, and out of print, Colonial Gothic Rulebook. So all the books I have from Gen Con are still good. CG uses the same d12 based (I remember the guys at the Rogue Games booth going on with glee on how they used the often neglected d12!) system that you find in Shadow, Sword & Spell (I am not 100% sure, but both games look like they are completely compatible with each other). The core book comes in at 282 pages, plus covers. The second thing I noticed that this book is much better looking than the first core book. No slight against that book, but this one is a gem. The first book had a nice hip "indie" feel about it. This book manages to pull off "indie" and "big time professional" between it's two covers. I like that.

    But what is Colonial Gothic? From the book: Colonial Gothic is a supernatural historical roleplaying game inspired by the history and setting of the American colonial period, from the founding of Roanoke in 1568 to the end of the War of 1812 at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815.

    Pretty cool if you ask me. For me Colonial Gothic continues the story that Mage: The Sorcerer's Crusade began and Ghosts of Albion continued to the industrial age; science and reason over superstition and magic in a world filled with horrors. But CG is more than just that. In this game the "Americans" are on new soil, but it is only new to them. There are horrors native to this land and their are the horrors they brought with them.

    The game mechanics are rather simple, which is a good thing, most often it is 2d12 +/- mods vs. a Target Number. It is called the 12° System. Often the Target Number is your Ability + Skill and rolled under. In other cases, such as an Ability test, you roll 1d12 and roll under the ability. Opposed Tests include things like combat. There are also Critical Success (double "1"s) and Critical Failures (double "12"s). Also the degrees of success (or failure) are important. In combat for example your degree of success is a multiplier to the damage. So is you need a 15 and roll a modified 10 you have 5 degrees of success. Simple. Chapter One covers all the basic rules from Abilities and Skills, to combat, to movement and even common ailments (and uncommon ones) to fear and sanity. Chapter Two is Character Creation. You get 45 points to divide out to your abilities (7 is human average). You can then choose a background ("class" for you class and level types; archetypes for everyone else) and then you get 45 points for your skills. These point totals can also be shifted up or down depending on the nature of the game. 40 for more grit, 50 for more action-adventure types. The new aspect is the choice of 5 character hooks. These provide your character with more detail and background and help explain why your character is an adventurer and not just a common Joe or Jane. Chapter Three goes into more detail about Skills and Hooks. Chapter Four covers magic, the magical arts and common spells and Alchemy. Magic has a price in CG and not everyone is cut out for it. Witches presented here are mostly evil, but there is some wiggle room. Chapter Five covers weapons, currency, equipment and trade. This is actually quite an important chapter since goods or the availability of them is not just part of the real Colonial history, but makes a great plot point.
    Chapter Six is a guide to the Colonies. It is a nice mix of history, geography and the occult conceits of the game. If you know some of the history of this time then you have an edge up, but there is a lot of great information here. Obviously some liberties have been taken, but it is less alt-history than I feared. Chapter Seven covers enemies and monsters. Both mundane and magical. At this time even a mundane bear is a threat. Chapter Eight covers advice for the game master and campaign ideas.

    If you want a cool game with occult dealings, magic, survival, or just plain good historical fun with a setting not often used in historical games then this is a must buy.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic: Rulebook Second Edition
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    Colonial Gothic: Rulebook Second Edition
    by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/14/2014 18:06:49

    WHAT WORKS: I'm a fairly psychotically patriotic, idealistic American, so playing or running a game at the dawn of the United States is cool to me, and adding in demons and devils and overwhelming eeeeevil just makes it cooler. I love a magic system with a chance of failure and consequences, which this certainly provides. It also provides utility spells, which are often omitted to the annoyance of many gamers of many games. The Action Points can easily make the game as cinematic as you like, by forcing success assuming you have any stockpiled at all, and you don't roll just miserably.

    WHAT DOESN'T WORK: Not enough random tables. What? I like random tables. Rolling Ability Tests seems like a dicey proposition, as you are rolling 2d12 and trying to get under a single number ranked 1-12. The creation guidelines for monsters and adversaries worries me that the game could get a tad hefty on the book keeping end for GMs. Personally speaking, I would totally have placed the rules after the character creation. Just felt jarring to me.

    CONCLUSION: I'd wanted to check this game out for some time, and I was glad to finally get a chance to. Supernatural action/horror in the time of the American Revolution ranks up there pretty highly on my list of "likes", right behind supernatural action/horror in the American West. Having not read the 1st edition, I can't tell you if it's worth buying if you already own that one, but for a first exposure to the game, I really enjoyed the subject matter and the presentation (aside from my quibbles with the organization). I'm slightly apprehensive about how the 12° system plays (specifically on Ability Tests), but the game has been around for quite a while and is in it's second edition without having that changed, apparently, so I'm willing to assume that the issue is bigger in my head. I would definitely like working this into my game table's rotation to find out for sure.

    For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2014/01/tommys-take-on-colonial-gothic-2nd.html



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic Bestiary
    by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/21/2013 11:46:31

    The role monsters play in Colonial Gothic will depend on the sort of game you like to run. If you play the default 'Gothic Horror' style of game, monsters are best used sparingly but to good effect as you build up the evidence and the tension until whatever creature is behind events is revealed. A 'historic fantasy' game might have a fair few monster encounters, just as any other fantasy game does. And if you enjoy the political aspects of the game, most monsters come on two legs! My own games, which are alternate-history with an interest in exploration and discovery, however, can find a use for a monster or two...

    There are over 50 monsters here, some are 'real' beasties - this doesn't detract from the threat they pose, take the alligator for example! - and others more fantastical, the beasts of myth and legend. Notes are provided as to the source of each one, useful if - for example - someone versed in the appropriate traditions is able to identify a given monster by matching the evidence to the legends that they know.

    Each monster comes with an illustration (many very appropriate to the period in style), a stat block and notes giving all the game mechanical information that you need to run them, and further descriptive notes coverning appearance and giving ideas about how they might be used in your game. Many are quite scary and characters encountering them will have to make a Fear test to do anything but run screaming in terror!

    The PDF version is comprehensively indexed, and there is a useful appendix which lists creature types and presents a combined listing of all monsters in this book and the core rulebook. In fact there are 2 lists, one being alphabetic and one by creature type to aid you in finding the right monster for your needs.

    A good addition to this game line which should find plenty of use!



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic Bestiary
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    Creator Reply:
    Thanks for the review! Here's a little more about Colonial Gothic and the Bestiary: http://graemedavis.wordpress.com/2013/10/21/here-be-monsters/
    Colonial Gothic: Gazetteer
    by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/14/2013 06:58:22

    Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/02/14/tabletop-review-colonial-gothic-gazetteer/

    Of all the Colonial Gothic material to review, this is an odd one to do later in the series because it is such essential setting information for the core book. Gazetteer was released in 2010, after a smattering of modules and after the revised edition of the core rulebook the year before. While some setting information sourcebooks had been released, this book had a broader scope that covered the colonies you would probably play in using the core book. Most of the colonies get their own chapter, with a few additional chapters dedicated to things like native tribes and an adventure.

    Essential History

    The book kicks off with a chapter on the basics of Colonial American history: wars, settlements, and the various acts (laws impressed upon America by the British). After that, each colony basically does the same, giving a brief history first followed by various nuggets of knowledge concerning the area. For instance, there is a section on the geography of each area as well as important locations and a few notable local legends or areas that might be adventure seeds. The only break from this pattern is in the section on Native American tribes, which turns out to be fairly comprehensive as far as I can tell. While not giving you a ton of information on the tribes, each one is given page real estate according to their presence in colonial life. The last chapter is an adventure involving the players intercepting a letter and then being asked to infiltrate a British fort.

    Low Detail, More Overview

    For a game master who is serious or wants to get serious about his commitment to a more historical Colonial Gothic game, this book is a must. It takes a bunch of necessary facts that are easy to grasp and organizes them by colony, then presents them according to type. It’s definitely not exhaustive, and the level of detail is more of a bird’s-eye view than anything else, but unless your players are hardcore into the historical detail aspect, it will suffice. Rogue Games continues to expand upon certain events or locations with entire sourcebooks so, while you will have to buy another book if you really want finer detail, you can get it if you want and you can pick and choose where you want your graininess. I find it a nice quick reference for historical timelines and important cities, I don’t use the mysteries as they tend to be sort of old-timey-American-legends type of things, and many of them I find silly. If you already know your American history cold or have other reference books around you want to use, you might skip this book. Otherwise, it’s a nice reference to have and read through for a general picture of each colony and its history.



    Rating:
    [3 of 5 Stars!]
    Colonial Gothic: Gazetteer
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    Colonial Gothic: New France
    by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/30/2013 10:57:20

    Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/01/30/tabletop-review-colonial-gothic-new-france/

    This review is part of a series of ongoing reviews of material for the Colonial Gothic RPG, a role-playing game set in Colonial America with supernatural and horror elements. For other reviews in the series check out this list:

    -Colonial Gothic Rulebook Second Edition -The Ross-Allen Letters -Organizations: The Templars -The French-Indian War

    Now, on to the review!

    Have you ever thought Colonial Gothic was missing something? Something…a little more French? Maybe you wondered: “do we have to play this game in the boring old 13 original colonies?” Or perhaps you thought out loud while reading some other sourcebooks: “yeah, yeah, but what about CANADA?” Well my friends, I’m going to tell you about a book that will blow the beaver pelts right off of your fur trade, because this is Colonial Gothic: New France written by Rogue Games’ resident New France correspondent Gabriel Brouillard. With this book, you’ll feel like you can take your table straight up to the French holdings in the North.

    Parlez Vous “Cult Activity?”

    Ok, so I have to mention something right off: this book is not really about supernatural stuff. It’s geared toward a mostly historical presentation of New France during the 18th century up through the end of the Revolutionary War. I say “mostly historical” because the book states that the facts as we know them are bent a bit to make the sourcebook more attuned the game rather than just a source of historical information. What would really bump these books to another level of awesomeness is if certain things were labeled as historical and non-historical. Perhaps, if only there were some sort of symbol that could be used to denote things which may require clarification or special mention, something like the things I might put around this word…that would be quite useful. For instance, if I were to write: George Washington led his troops on a yellow horse, which was colored in that manner because he superstitiously powdered it in Turmeric before a major military movement or engagement*. That kind of notation would let people know that I made that sh– up.

    So what are the historical parts then, what does Brouillard have to tell us? The book starts off with the beginning of France’s involvement in the New World, and then continues on detailing milestones which mostly involve major conflicts like wars with the British or edicts passed by the British or…British occupation. Ok, a lot of it has to do with Britain, but at the time those Brits were all up in everybody’s business, so it’s no wonder they ended up getting booted off of the island (eventually). The major periods include “The Golden Age of New France”, a time of growth and prosperity for the settlers there; the period around the French-Indian War, where Britain and France once again came into conflict; and the period of the Revolutionary War, where French sympathizers aided against the British and where those seeking refuge from the war traveled North to New France. All told, this book encompasses the early 1700s, and then from about 1756 to 1783 with snippets from other parts of the 18th century.

    Oh Acadia

    Chapter 2 is a run-down of colonies in New France, most of which are recognizable names today (to Americans anyway) like Montreal, Canada, Newfoundland, and Quebec. Each colony gets a brief description of how it was founded and notable things that happened there. Following that are descriptions and illustrations of forts and trading posts, and then a good many pages discussing the various kinds of people that would populate a French colony. There is a passage about how at one point immigration was limited to Catholics and any others wanting to come had to renounce their faith and convert. This made it a bit harder to get people over to New France! Land was controlled by this group and handed down to seigneurs to be further divided among the settlers. In this way the regions of New France were populated, so the book explains. This chapter also includes an interesting portion about a group of one hundred merchants who basically were given a monopoly on the lucrative fur trade in exchange for bringing settlers to New France. Is this true or not? I assume it is at least partly true, but there is nothing in the book letting me know one way or the other, and while I am somewhat knowledgeable about the period I don’t know about anything like that. Again, some symbol might come in handy here to let the reader know what the author has made up for the game world.

    Chapters 3 and 4 contain information on the various organizations and groups one might find in New France, like the aforementioned merchant cabal. The non-native ones are few but include the Spain-established Knights of Malta. Other groups mentioned are mostly native tribes including the murky “Mandoag” which are a ubiquitous and shadowy native group found in nearly all Colonial Gothic books I’ve seen. Other native tribes like the Huron and even the Inuit are mentioned, each getting their own paragraph or two of brief history and description. There is no really detailed information here, but it does give you some names to throw around and add a little authenticity to your game. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 are each dedicated to one of the important historical periods I mentioned earlier. For each period there is a longer description of the events that transpired and how they affected New France, as well as groups involved and important personalities with adventure hooks including them. These chapters have some really nice information on these periods and what they meant to the development of New France; for instance the French-Indian War chapter goes on about the French generals as they struggled to keep the British from taking Quebec, and gives several adventure scenarios involving different groups like the Freemasons, or legends like hidden Templar riches.

    Duels!

    The last four chapters are a smattering of rules on various topics. There are some new backgrounds added like French Catholic priest and Coureur des Bois, a person who goes out into the wild to trade with native peoples. Some backgrounds are just New France versions of the ones found in the core book, like Rural and Urban Colonist. You’re given two entire pages of French names from the period, how cool! Enjoy naming your French colonist “Michaud St. Pierre”. There is a chapter dedicated to duels. Yes, in case the honor of your character or your character’s charge is tarnished in some way, you can now look at these rules and see whether you prefer a sword duel or a pistol duel, and if the latter which set of rules you would like to abide by. The last two chapters are some adventure seeds in the form of mysteries (real or not? I don’t know!) that can be turned into Colonial Gothic sessions and a short chapter containing a few monsters. The adventures are interesting and peculiar, like high-quality roads being mysteriously built in the middle of nowhere and a magnetic hill…not sure how to turn those into riveting adventures but who knows.

    Overall, this book is great if you want to run an adventure in Canada or other French-owned territories, or if you are looking for more information for a campaign during the French-Indian war. Gabriel does a great job of condensing information and whipping up some adventure ideas, as well as giving Game Masters what they need to help make the game authentic in the French territories. Great supplement for Colonial Gothic.



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    Colonial Gothic: New France
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