RPGNow.com
Browse Categories
 Publisher Info
Room Name Generator
Room Name Generator
Pay What You Want













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
On the Air rulebook
by Mark C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/11/2018 05:17:59

Do you like the radio dramas of the early decades of the 20th century? Have you dreamt of a roleplaying game designed to emulate the radio drama genre? If so, then you owe it to yourself to checkout On the Air by Spectrum Games.

I had three players: Christopher, Terry, and new guy Leroy (which makes him the first actual Leroy I remember ever meeting). On the Air (or OtA hereafter) instructs the Director (read: gamemaster) to design a series, complete with a sponsor, a small cast of primary characters (PC), and however many supporting characters (SC), recurring or not, that fit the narrative. I completed the all of the above except for the SC, which we more or less made up on the fly during the game. You can my game prep and in-game notes in the pic below:

http://spesmagna.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/ota-notes.jpg

The series was Uncanny Worlds, sponsored by Estrella Coffee, and the episode title was “The Flying Jungle of Bellatrix”. The main cast of characters was Captain James Augustus Church, Lieutenant Commander Doctor Lana “Brains” MacAvoy, and Technology and Science Android XJ14 (TASA, for short). You can see the PCs here:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1o1j2N01yKdr5Dgy-JvMoEDB6awTgwIL5

Christopher played “Brains”, Terry played TASA, and Leroy played Captain Church.

The set-up introduced the episode by title, plugged the sponsor, and then described how the shuttlecraft from Space Exploration Teams Incorporated space rocket Ambition descended into Bellatrix’s atmosphere, heading to the largest of the famed flying jungles in a search for valuable deposits of floatanium, a rare anti-gravity element essential to space travel. Just as Shuttlecraft Navigator Trotsky announced, “Land ho, Captain!”, the shuttlecraft’s klaxon blared. A monstrous pteradon roared out of the clouds, claws extended, intending to prey on the shuttlecraft.

Which brings us to OtA‘s central mechanic: the Intention.

The players decided that they wanted to evade the pteradon while firing blasters out a porthole as the shuttlecraft came in for a safe landing on the flying jungle. In a traditional RPG, this would most likely be played out round-to-round, involving various skill checks and attack rolls. Not so with OtA. With the Intention system, what’s important isn’t the journey, but the destination. Everything is resolved with a single roll of the dice, and the results are narrated radio-drama style.

If you looked at the characters, you noticed they have three ability scores: Adventure, Thought, and Drama. Each score is rated, usually between -1 and 2 (but rules do include the possibility for higher ratings for super-heroics). Here’s where we hit our first foggy area in the rules, which seem to written based on the assumption of one Director and one PC.

The PC with the Intention figures out his total score based on the appropriate trait, perhaps tagging a Descriptor (such as Church’s “Former Space Soldier”). The total score may be adjusted by the opposition of an SC (such as the pteradon, which I arbitrarily decided was SC 3). Since multiple players described how their characters helped, I allowed multiple ability scores to determine the group’s total, and then reduced that total by 3 to reflect the difficulty of the encounter. One player then rolled the number of dice as shown on the “How Many Dice Do I Roll and What Do I Keep?” table. The total, which may be adjusted by Airwave Tokens (more on these later), is checked against the “Intention Results Table” to determine what happens.

On the Air Reference Sheet: http://www.spectrum-games.com/uploads/1/2/3/7/12374018/ota-reference_sheet.pdf

An episode (read: adventure) has a time limit, which is defined by a certain number of Intentions. Since our series Uncanny Worlds has a broadcast time of 30 minutes, the episode is limited to 10 Intentions, which means the players get to roll the dice 10 times during the course of the game. Once all 10 Intentions have been used, the episodes ends, perhaps in a cliffhanger (as happened in our game session). Keep in mind that the 30 minute broadcast time is a narrative fiction; it’s not the length of the game session itself, which for us ran to about 4 hours with quite a lot of hemming and hawing and goofing off.

The “Intention Results Table” will be very familiar to anyone whose played Dungeon World or other games Powered by the Apocalypse. A 2-6 total results in a failure, which is narrated by the Director; a 7-9 means the player chooses between a Controlled Failure (narrated by the player) or a Conditional Success (narrated by the Director); and a 10+ is a Success narrated by the player.

Which brings us to narrating the game. Since OtA emulates radio dramas, everything must be described as if the game had an actual audience of people who can only hear what is happening. This includes the players and Director making appropriate sound effects. OtA has many paragraphs of advice on how to do this, and, at least for our group, it was easier to read about and explain than actually do. We’re programmed for traditional RPGs, where the audience isn’t an imaginary construct listening to the players through a radio, but rather is just the people actually in the room. Several times, we had to remind each other to explain what, say, certain hand gestures or facial expressions would be conveyed to people who couldn’t see them.

Our narrations included using Airwave Tokens to edit the scene, repeated endorsements of Estrella Coffee (almost always delivered in character as part of the episode’s dialogue), and one station break to directly advertise Estrella Coffee (the latter activity earning a Sponsorship Token). Airwave Tokens are like action points or hero points common to many games. They are earned when the Director tags a character flaw, making sound effects (once per scene), or being clever and/or true to the genre. Players start with two Airwave Tokens, they’re easy to earn, and the players spent theirs freely for scene editing, power tagging, and boosting.

If a character has a relevant description to include with an intention, one die in the dice pool gets upgraded to a d8. A tagged flaw reduces one die to a d4. With power tagging, one more die gets upgraded to a d8. The Sponsorship Token was earned for roleplaying the advertising segment, which highlighted the virtues of Estrella Coffee by the primary characters and included the main antagonist saying Estrella Coffee’s noble flavor offended his evil palate. A Sponsorship Token can be earned only once per episode. The rules appear somewhat vague to me about which player, if any, “owns” the Sponsorship Token. We treated it as a group resource. At the end of the episode, Christopher used the Sponsorship Token for an automatic success to save Captain Church.

During the episode, the PCs formed an alliance with the Jaguar Men of Bellatrix to oppose the nefarious forces of Ying the Heartless from the planet Thongu. Ying’s soldiers had enslaved many Jaguar Men, forcing them to work in the floatanium mines. There was trouble with a T-Rex, whose floatanium-infused scales made it remarkably agile. Captain Church and TASA were captured and sent to the mines after a daring attempt to escape by riding swiftly on boaboa birds, a noble effort thwarted by a hypno-cannon. “Brains” was also captured, and taken to the tent of the Thongu captain, who later was revealed to be Captain Church’s long-lost brother Gregory. There were thrilling escapes accomplished by digging through the bottom of the floating island while “Brains” drugged Gregory and used the shuttlecraft to rendezvous with Church, TASA, and many Jaguar Men in the sky beneath the flying jungle.

At this time, the Jaguar Man leader revealed that the Thongu soldiers had a sonic transducer set up to transmit the “heart of floatanium” that enabled the jungle to fly. TASA and “Brains” lead Jaguar Men into the mine to face the giant crab monster guarding the sonic transducer while Church engaged his treacherous brother in single combat. TASA used the sonic transducer to teleport the giant crab to Thongu, but not without TASA being transported as well. Church lost to his brother, but the intervention of the Sponsorship Token changed the narration so that Trotsky came roaring in on the shuttlecraft with Jaguar Men reinforcements from another village, thus saving the day.

The episode ended with a cliffhanger as TASA and the giant crab appeared in the sonic transducer reception chamber within the palace of Ying the Heartless on distant Thongu.

Throughout the episode, there were lots of sound effects, repeated dialogue singing the virtues of Estrella Coffee, and plenty of ham and cheese in the form of overacting and punny quips. We even had a recurring subplot about supporting character Security Lieutenant Wilson’s unrequited love for “Brains” remaining unrequited despite his best efforts to win over the good doctor.

All in all, OtA was great fun. It is rules light, and all of the rules are aimed at emulating the radio drama genre. The only other genre-emulation game published by Spectrum Games I’ve played is Cartoon Action Hour, which is also great fun. I don’t see OtA becoming our main game, but I definitely want to play it again.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
On the Air rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

On the Air rulebook
by Jean M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/01/2018 18:06:25

I don't write reviews often, not least because I'm a believer in "Praise publicly, criticize privately." But some games are worth reviewing, and this is one of them.

I'm an Old-Time Radio (OTR) fan, and have been for years. I'm the only person I know whose iPod is full of Boston Blackie episodes, and I'm watching a Captain Midnight secret decoder (I only need a couple more years to complete my collection) on eBay as I type this. In retrospect, it makes perfect sense to use OTR as a basis for a game.

OTR is neatly packaged up in either self-contained episodes or serials. It is chock full of dramatic situations, exciting events, and heroic characters, sometimes with special abilities. It can take place in a nearby or a distant jungle, or just about anywhere else. In short, it's perfectly set up for an RPG campaign.

And On The Air captures that perfectly (at least as best I can tell from reading it; playing will require finding at least one more OTR fan around here) The game system is geared toward dramatic action rather than grittily realistic simulation. It's laid out well and should be very easy to get into. The game system is simple in comparison to many, but perfectly suited to the subject.

In addition, there is quite a lot of information on OTR itself, including some recommended shows. (note that archive dot org has many of them available for download nowadays) It was cool finding some of my favorites on there; I just downloaded a batch of Johnny Dollar episodes I haven't heard) If you've ever so much as heard of the Shadow and think there might be something interesting or gameable there, get this game. You won't regret spending the price of a sandwich on it.

Honestly, my only quibble with it is the formatting: The layout is beautiful, and looks awesome on the screen, great production values, but I'd really like to have a bare-bones, no-background, copy of the rules I could print out, too, because I'm one of those people who just likes things on dead trees.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks for the amazing review, Jean. I'm thrilled that you like the game. I think you'll be surprised at how easy you'll find gamers who are willing to roleplay in the worlds of OTR. The game will be available as a hardcopy book. I'll be sending the PDF for print approval within a day or two. Also, I plan to make a printer-friendly version of the rulebook available so it won't be hard on people's ink. Thanks again for the review. Word of mouth is crucial for the survival of small press games. :)
Wild West Cinema rulebook
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/25/2017 02:09:18

Wild West Cinema is a quick, easy, and rules lite western game. While it presents itself as a 'Hollywood Western' game, you can easily play a more historic campaign. The system is reminiscent of ICONS super hero rpg, with about the same level of crunch. While there are several archetype characters to choose from, the system is simple enough to create other character types as well in just a few minutes.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wild West Cinema rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Retrostar Rulebook
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/03/2017 04:40:56

Retro ist Trend. Spectrum Games bringt uns dafür in eine Zeit zurück, die manchen noch als Kindheit in Erinnerung sein dürfte, anderen nur noch aus Legenden bekannt ist: die 70er und ihre SciFi-Serien. Hier entsteht der Brückenschlag zwischen dem Gefühl der guten alten Zeit und aktuellen, erzählerischen Rollenspielmethoden.

Auf faszinierende Weise pendelt Retrostar zwischen fixem Setting und Universallösung hin und her. Einerseits ist Immersion oberstes Gebot, andererseits schwebt beständig die Abrissbirne über der vierten Mauer. Während einzelne Handlungen in einem weiten Rahmen skizziert werden, ist die generelle Möglichkeit zu handeln streng limitiert. Beinahe alles ist von solchen Gegensätzen durchzogen. Nur in einer Sache sind sich die Regeln absolut sicher, und damit so retro wie man es sich nur vorstellen kann. Alles liegt in der Hand der Spielleitung.

Die Spielwelt

Das generelle Setting, in das Retrostar eingebettet ist, sind die 1970er und die Science-Fiction-Serien jener Zeit. Weite Teile des ersten Kapitels widmen sich auf sehr liebevolle Art und Weise dieser Ära. Dabei wird sowohl der Stil der 70er im Allgemeinen, als auch in Bezug auf das SciFi-Genre im Speziellen beleuchtet. Dabei geht es nicht nur um Kleidung, Frisuren und Musik. Die typischen Themen und Konventionen der Serien-Ära wurden gewissenhaft zusammengetragen und erläutert. Wer diese Zeit und ihre Serien noch selbst kennt, freut sich sicher über die Auffrischung und den sachlichen Blick darauf.

Sollte man erst später das Licht der Welt erblickt haben, hat man nach diesem Grundkurs zumindest eine klare Idee davon, wohin es gehen soll. Ob dabei auf gefühlt jeder zweiten Seite jedoch die knappen Budgets erwähnt werden müssen, mit denen die Serien seinerzeit auskommen mussten, sei dahingestellt. Die zweite Hälfte des Settings ist die Serie, die man spielen möchte. Oder besser, die Serie, welche die Spielleitung spielen möchte. Sagt einem keine der zehn bereits erstellten Serien als Hintergrund für die eigene Runde zu, gilt es eine eigene von Grund auf zu entwerfen. Zu diesem Zweck wird der Showrunner, wie der Posten der Spielleitung in Retrostar bezeichnet wird, mit einer Art Charakterbogen für die Serie ausgestattet. Diese sogenannte Series Bible ist zur Einsicht für die gesamte Gruppe gedacht, weshalb man um seine eigenen Notizen nicht herumkommt.

Aufgabe des Showrunners ist es also nun vom Pitch, einer schmissigen, spoilerfreien Synopsis, über das Gesamtkonzept bis hin zu den Dials, einer Regelmechanik, die wir uns noch ansehen werden, alles im Alleingang auszuarbeiten. Das Gesamtkonzept beinhaltet übrigens neben Überlegungen zum Werdegang des Settings und darin vorkommenden Antagonisten auch einen ersten Entwurf der Protagonisten. Somit liegt der erste Schritt der Charaktererstellung ebenfalls in der Hand der Spielleitung. Ein interessanter, und für manche Ideen sicherlich auch notwendiger, Ansatz, der aber doch gegen die Gewohnheiten einiger Spielrunden gehen dürfte. Die Dials schließlich drücken einen Teil der Serie in Zahlenwerten aus. Hierbei handelt es sich jedoch um Dinge außerhalb der Serienwelt. Thematic legt fest, wie häufig die Serie auf gesellschaftliche und soziale Themen eingeht. Natürlich streng im Geiste der 70er. Plot bestimmt die generelle Entwicklung der Serie. Gibt es einen Metaplot und Charakterentwicklung, oder wird jede Woche aufs Neue nur irgendeine außerirdische Bestie umgelegt? Recurring teilt uns mit, ob die Serie bestimmte Elemente häufig wiederholt.

Bekommen wir jede Folge eine Raumschlacht zu sehen, ist das definitiv ein wiederkehrendes Element. Um der Ära des Settings gerecht zu werden, gibt es den Wert Cheese. Alles, was so abgedreht, albern oder so tief dem Zeitgeist geschuldet ist, dass man schon eine Generation später wegen Fremdschämens im Boden versinken will, fällt in diesen Bereich. Die letzte Dial wird als SFX bezeichnet und stellt das Budget für Spezialeffekte dar. Dieser Wert dürfte einen während des Spielens am häufigsten begegnen. Denn in der Anwendung unterscheidet sich SFX von allen anderen Dials und hat den spürbarsten Regeleffekt.  

Die Regeln

Im Kern möchte Retrostar ein erzählerisches System sein. Daher steht vor dem eigentlichen Würfelwurf zunächst der sogenannte Intent einer Handlung. Man erläutert nicht eine einzelne, kleinteilige Aktion seines Charakters, sondern erklärt gleich einen größeren, szenischen Handlungsablauf. Statt also eine Aktion für den Sprint durch den Raumschiffhangar zu nehmen, eine weitere, um auf die bösen Androiden zu schießen, und eventuell dann noch eine, um das eigene Schiff zu besteigen, beschreibt man den gesamten Ablauf durchgehend. Dabei kommt es weniger auf die konkreten Aktionen an, als vielmehr auf die Idee, welches Resultat man am Ende haben möchte. Dieser große Handlungsspielraum ist allerdings auch absolut notwendig. Denn das Spiel sieht vor, dass jede Episode, sprich, jedes Abenteuer, in fünf Akte aufgeteilt ist.

Und pro Akt stehen allen Beteiligten, also Spielern wie Showrunner, zusammen nur zwölf Würfelwürfe zu. Auf diese Art soll das Gefühl einer 60 Minuten langen Fernsehfolge entstehen, in der Zeit ein rares Gut ist und eben nur eine bestimmte Anzahl an Szenen unterzubringen ist. Ist die Absicht eines Charakters erklärt, wird zu den Würfeln gegriffen. Retrostar kommt hier ausschließlich mit Sechsseitern aus. Aus dem Intent ergibt sich, welches der drei Attribute, namentlich Adventure, Thought und Drama, als Grundlage dient. Die Werte reichen von -1 bis 2, wobei 0 den Durchschnittswert darstellt. Der Showrunner erklärt, welche Hindernisse, die ebenfalls mit einem bestimmten Zahlenwert versehen sind, sich in der Szenerie befinden und überwunden werden müssen. Die sich daraus ergebende Zahl wird vom verwendeten Attribut abgezogen. Danach hat man die Möglichkeit, auf verschiedene Arten den eigenen Wert wieder anzuheben, seien es Charaktereigenschaften, Special Effects oder ein Spotlight Token. Letztere sind die Entsprechung zu Schicksalspunkten, Stuntwürfeln und Gummipunkten in Retrostar. Ist alles miteinander verrechnet, hat man den finalen Wert, der festlegt, wie der Würfelwurf aussieht. Der Standardwert 0 gibt einem zwei Würfel, deren einzelne Ergebnisse nach dem Wurf addiert werden. Jede Verschiebung von 0 in den positiven Zahlenraum spendiert uns einen Würfel mehr, und es dürfen die beiden höchsten Werte zusammengezählt werden.

Für jeden Punkt unter 0 erhält man zwar auch einen weiteren Würfel, jedoch müssen die beiden niedrigsten Ergebnisse addiert werden. Resultiert die Summe in einem Wert von 10 oder höher, kann man einen Erfolg für sich verbuchen. Alles von 2 bis 6 ist ein Fehlschlag. Erreicht man einen Wert von 7 bis 9, hat man die Wahl. Entweder misslingt die geplante Handlung, es gibt aber keine weiteren negativen Auswirkungen für den Charakter, oder die Aktion ist erfolgreich, dafür erleidet der Charakter jedoch Konsequenzen wie bei einem Fehlschlag. Diese Entscheidung will wohlüberlegt sein. Denn ein Fehlschlag in Retrostar bedeutet Kontrollverlust. Der Showrunner übernimmt das Ruder komplett und erzeugt ein möglichst serientypisches Resultat. Der handelnde Charakter wird von den bösen Androiden überwältigt und gefangen genommen. Oder er stürzt von der Landeplattform hinab in die Wolken und verschwindet so aus der Sicht und aus der Szene. Die Spielleitung nimmt das Schicksal des Charakters gänzlich aus der Hand des Spielers und lässt alle am Tisch im Ungewissen. Das soll Spannung am Tisch und das Gefühl, eine spannende Folge der eigenen Lieblingsserie zu sehen, erzeugen.

In der Praxis stellt es wohl vor allem eine rollenspielerische Herausforderung für alle Beteiligten dar. Auf Seiten des Showrunners ist viel Improvisationstalent und Gespür für Drama gefragt. Die Spieler und Spielerinnen brauchen großes Vertrauen in den Spielleiter und darin, dass alles, was geschieht, schlussendlich dazu dient, die Charaktere die Helden der Geschichte sein zu lassen. Die restlichen Regeln drehen sich vornehmlich um die oben erwähnten Dials. Je nach Konzept der Serie kann einer solchen Dial vom Showrunner einen Wert zwischen 0 und 6 zugewiesen bekommen. Vor jeder neuen Episode wird mit dem Wurf eines W6 pro Dial ermittelt, ob diese im kommenden Abenteuer eine Rolle spielt. Dieses Zufallselement, in einem System, das eigentlich eine sehr strikte Planung des Showrunners erwartet, mutet ein wenig seltsam an und schraubt den Anspruch an die Erfahrung des Spielleiters noch einmal nach oben. Eine Ausnahme bildet die SFX-Dial. Diese stellt einen Pool dar, aus dem sich alle Beteiligten bedienen dürfen, um Würfe schwieriger oder leichter zu machen. Natürlich sollte diese Funktion als cooler Spezialeffekt innerhalb der Szene verpackt werden.  

Charaktererschaffung

Der Charakterbau ist, abgesehen von der Schöpfung einer eigenen Serie, der kreativste Teil der Regeln. Zunächst besteht der Charakter aus seinem Background. Dies ist eine kurze, präzise Beschreibung der Rolle, die durch den Charakter in der Serie eingenommen wird. Diesen Teil übernimmt der Showrunner bereits bei der Erstellung seiner Serie. Als Nächstes folgt das Casting. Hier darf nun der Spieler erstmals tätig werden. Das Casting definiert den Schauspieler, der die im Background definierte Rolle spielt. Hierfür stehen allerdings nur 25 Worte zur Verfügung. Da keine ganzen Sätze ausformuliert werden müssen, sondern Stichpunkte wie Kinderstar, rauchige Stimme oder ehemaliger Footballspieler ausreichen, sollte man mit der begrenzten Anzahl an Worten eigentlich ganz gut hinkommen. All diese Eigenschaften dienen im Spiel dazu, unter bestimmten Umständen Bonuswürfel für einen Intent zu generieren.

Anschließend werden die Werte für die Attribute, hier Traits genannt, festgelegt. Man verteilt die Zahlen 1, 0 und -1 auf die drei Traits. Danach darf man einen der Werte noch um einen Punkt erhöhen. Um auch in die blanken Zahlen ein wenig Individualisierung einzubringen, darf man noch so genannte Descriptors definieren. Jeder Trait, dessen Wert nicht 0 ist, darf mit mindestens einem solchen Descriptor versehen werden. Dabei handelt es sich um eine besondere Eigenschaft, passend zum entsprechenden Trait. Legt man eine Probe ab, bei der ein solcher Descriptor zum Tragen kommen könnte, erhält man einen Bonus. Zuletzt verfügt auch noch jeder Charakter über Dials. Auch diese stellen eine mögliche Quelle für Bonuswürfel dar, sofern die Dial zu Beginn der Episode durch einen Würfelwurf aktiviert wurde. Bei der Charaktererschaffung muss man sich hierüber jedoch noch keine Gedanken machen. Die Regeln raten an, erst ab der dritten Episode, wenn man schon ein gutes Gefühl für den Charakter hat, die persönlichen Dials mit Werten zu versehen. Durch den erzählerischen Charakter des Spiels stellt sich die Frage nach der Mächtigkeit eines Charakters eigentlich gar nicht so sehr.

Da es in den Regeln jedoch ziemliche Auswirkungen hat, ob ein Trait nun einen Wert von 0 oder 2 hat, entsteht ein ziemliches Gefälle zwischen Charakteren, die eigentlich ein ähnliches Aufgabengebiet innerhalb einer Gruppe abdecken. Wie sehr sich dieser Unterschied im Spiel auswirkt, lässt sich allerdings erst in der Praxis bewerten. Der Charakterbogen ist sehr aufgeräumt gestaltet und bietet Platz für alle notwendigen Informationen. Tatsächlich ist er sogar so schlank, dass die zwei spielerrelevanten Tabellen, die es im Spiel gibt, auch noch auf den Bogen passen.  

Erscheinungsbild

Aufmachung und Layout bleiben dem Stil der 1970er absolut treu. Gedeckte Pastellfarben, Textkästen, die an alte SciFi-Computer erinnern, und sogar ein paar Fotos aus jener Zeit machen unmissverständlich klar, in welche Richtung es hier gehen soll. Die Bilder, durchgehend von Brent Sprecher gemacht, sind solide. Ein paar wenige Illustrationen hängen dem restlichen Niveau etwas hinterher, man merkt aber deutlich, dass man es mit einem Profi und nicht mit Fanart zu tun hat.

Der Index ist kompakt und für die 133 Seiten dieses Regelwerks absolut ausreichend, da auch innerhalb des Buches immer wieder Querverweise mit Angabe der Seiten gemacht werden. Am Ende des Buches wird man ordentlich mit Vorlagen für die Series Bible, einem Charakterbogen und einem Referenzbogen versorgt. Das PDF bleibt leider hinter seinen digitalen Möglichkeiten zurück. Trotz, oder gerade wegen, der Kürze des Regelwerks wäre ein digitaler Index eine tolle Sache gewesen. Nun gut, so trägt es dafür  auch zum Retrogefühl bei.

Fazit

Retrostar ist ein spannendes Experiment. Bestimmt vom Stil der 1970er Jahre erschafft und kreiert der Spielleiter seine Vision einer Science-Fiction-Serie. Das beginnt bei der grundsätzlichen Idee des Settings, geht über den gesamten Handlungsverlauf der einzelnen Episoden und endet erst nach der Definition der möglichen Protagonisten, also der Spielercharaktere. Auch im weiteren Verlauf bleibt der Spielleiter die zentrale Figur, denn jeder Misserfolg eines Charakters führt dazu, dass sein weiteres Schicksal zunächst durch die Spielleitung bestimmt wird. Somit sind sowohl langfristige Planung, als auch gehöriges Improvisationstalent gefragt. Die Protagonisten, und somit auch die Spielerinnen und Spieler dahinter, dienen einzig und allein der Geschichte.

Die grundsätzlichen Regelmechanismen sind übersichtlich, leuchten schnell ein und unterstützen an sich das erzählerische Grundkonzept von Retrostar. Gleichzeitig gibt es einige Regeln, die sich nicht auf das Geschehen innerhalb des Abenteuers beziehen, sondern abbilden wollen, dass es sich eben um eine Serie in den 70ern handelt. Und hier liegt der Schwachpunkt des Systems. Immer wieder wird an der vierten Mauer gekratzt, ohne diese jedoch wirklich zu durchbrechen. Die einzelnen Komponenten sind tolle Ideen, die auf den vorhanden 133 Seiten jedoch im Zusammenspiel nicht ihr volles Potential entfalten können. Vielleicht wäre ein erweiterter Director’s Cut eine gute Idee. Erfahrene Rollenspielgruppen, die einen erzählerischen Stil bevorzugen, für Experimente offen sind und SciFi mögen, können hier bedenkenlos zugreifen.

Auch wer generell einen Hang zu Serien wie Buck Rogers, Battlestar Galactica, die alte wohlgemerkt, oder Der Sechs-Millionen-Dollar-Mann hat, sollte einen Blick riskieren. Für andere Gruppen ist Retrostar eher nur bedingt zu empfehlen. Dieser Ersteindruck basiert auf der Lektüre des Regelwerks. Ein baldiger Spieltest ist eher unwahrscheinlich.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Retrostar Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

CAH:S3 -- Dark Brigade
by Isaiah H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/30/2017 01:36:13

Not only is this my favorite of the CaH Setting Books but is by and far the most well realized and fleshed out. It has very detailed characters that are actually fun to read about.

This isnt just a great sourcebook for CaH but just a great read and filled with fun ideas.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CAH:S3 -- Dark Brigade
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

CAH:S3 -- The Complete Guide to Warriors of the Cosmos
by Bryan B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/04/2017 20:11:26

Well here is a little review for Warriors of the Cosmos book. It creates a setting/series that is playable for Cartoon Action Hour 3rd edition. It simulates a cartoon series that lasted 6 seasons along with the failed movie and failed girl focused spin off series.

Also note I do have link to the company behind book and friend to people who produce it so I mite be a bit biased in this review.

First thing off I do think this is the most interesting series book to date. it really startles the line between rpg book and feeling like a book for popular cartoon series. It does capture the feel with the interviews with production staff, the bits of history and gossip and well the treating vehicles and bases as actual toys verses describing just the places to adventure in. The one aspect I would have changed in that case would have a few more episode summaries (adventure seeds) placed in the seasons they happen. Currently they are in GM Section of the book. This makes sense from rpg point of view, but breaks a bit on simulating being a TV series.

Though a better description of the book should be given. It starts with introduction and gives "backstory" on how the series was created. It then gives a broad view of the world and then does chapter for all 6 seasons plus characters for each season. Beyond that we get description of an un-produced movie, spin off and more modern reboot series aimed at teen and adults. It then has player section with new random character creation and GM section on handle series, advice on making series Gm own and episode (adventure) seeds plus one adventure.

This produces both one of the longest CAH series book, but also one that should be ready to play out of the book. Though admittedly there is a lot of meta-fiction in the book that not everyone will like or use. I personally enjoy this type of meta-fiction.

As I said what really stands out in this product is bringing series to life with both good and bad decisions and elements that make if feel more like real cartoon. Also I had fun with Cynthia throwing in characters based around stuff she likes including female Judge Dread and character based on movie Manos: Hands of Fate. This all mixed together creates an interesting book I highly recommend.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CAH:S3 -- The Complete Guide to Warriors of the Cosmos
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

CAH:S3 -- FLAG Force
by John F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/02/2017 07:16:59

  Great idea for an 80's era cartoon, turned into an even better supplement for Spectrums' wonderful rpg Cartoon Action Hour. Players create agents from all around the world, battling to drive off the alien 'Starmada' while using the ruins of the United Nations building as a base of operations. Tons of fun for the whole table!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CAH:S3 -- FLAG Force
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Tacky, Tawdry and Tasteless: the Reality Show RPG
by Alan H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/05/2017 17:39:51

I know that this was issued as an April Fool's Day joke - as indicated by the page at the end in which Spectrum start out by saying they are planning at least 8 source books . . . before stting that it's an April Fool.

The game itself is actually rather fun. It's a quick and simple game to play - if you're looking for a serious game with more in-depth characters and a wider skill-set then you need to look for a different system. Rules are minimal and essentially involves rolling a D6 and comparing the result to a stat that you are using. Characters are created in a manner of minutes - there are 5 stats and you roll 6D6 and ignore the lowest dice, make any 1s left a 4 and then apply the remaining values to your 5 stats - with 2 being the best score and 6 being the worst. You then get to assign up to 3 Positive Qualities and 1 Negative Quality to your character. These give bonueses or penalties to your dice roll. As the game progresses you will earn and spend Edit Points which can be used to allow re-rolls or to change something in a scene. There's a TV show format to the game with segements interrupted by Commercial Breaks - you roll on a table to see the result of the Ad Break - your show can gain or lose viewers, one or more characters can gain Edit Points due to their popularity or lack-of.

All in all a fun game. I've done a couple of shows with this format - Porn Stars Got Talent (a talent show for former porn stars who are trying to change thier career by doing singing or stand-up-comedy); Celebrity Riggers (an elimination competition in which Z-List Celebrities try their hand at working on an off-shore oil rig) and Teecherz (a fly on the wall day-to-day life study of a group of teachers in a seriously bad fictional school).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Tacky, Tawdry and Tasteless: the Reality Show RPG
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Stories from the Grave
by Dorian Y. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/01/2017 18:32:36

I think that this material is well presented and has a lot to offer. The author does a great job of capturing the atmosphere of a splatter comic and explaining the elements of a great story. The explaination of putting together a game using the three act structure will be valuable for both this and other game systems you may run.

There is something about this approach though. Any game that uses a three act structure cannot deviate too far from a pre-determined conclusion. It's not exactly on rails. The players have the ability to add to the narrative. However, it also isn't an open game where the story is allow to run in any direction.

The intention system used by this game is legit. You could use it without any trouble and I think most people will pick it up easily. The problem is that it offers nothing over all the systems you probably already know. It has limited skill based system that gets modified and everything is thrown against a ladder of success. You can use grave tokens to do things like add to the narrative. So the temptation for me is just to run a game using FATE accelerated which also does those exact same things only probably better and all of the players will already be familiar with the system.

The interesting thing, at least for me, is that I'm not sure how well all of this will truly work. People like to win. And this game like so many others encourages players to fight for their life and win the battle. If you are familiar with 'Tales from The Crypt' and similar EC comics you will note that nobody ever wins. Usually, there aren't even any good guys. I suppose 'Twilight Zone' and similar stories will play well on this system but I don't think that's the main target.

Honestly, it feels like the goal of the game should be to get your despicable character killed in the third act in some righteous twist. The player should have tools to narrate this demise and the skill with which they execute it should be measurable. However well they pull off the character death the player should receive rewards that carry over to the next game. That is what is missing from this system and it is what would make it complete. Unfortunately it completely flies in the face of the system. A system that rewards and supports keeping a character alive. It's the same reason that FATE sucks for horror games.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Stories from the Grave
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Tacky, Tawdry and Tasteless: the Reality Show RPG
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/18/2016 08:19:38

The game achieves the intended purpose. I would have liked a few more examples, but I guess you could watch some reality TV to get some ideas. It's definitely worth the price.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Tacky, Tawdry and Tasteless: the Reality Show RPG
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Retrostar Rulebook
by Jack S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/12/2016 22:51:56

A real fun book that captures the style of both the period and running an RPG, not just baised on the wolrd of a TV program, but running the program itself. I bought this game, really, just to read the book and maybe get some ideas from it. It impressed me enough that I am going to run a Retrostar series for my friends. The main weakness of the book would be that it could use a chapter that goes more in depth about how to write and beet chart the 5 atc television screen play.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Retrostar Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Not Even Freedom is Free
by Michael J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/11/2015 12:20:41

The adventure idea is ok, but the system is complex so play it in anther game.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Not Even Freedom is Free
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Christmas Comes But Once a Year
by Michael J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/11/2015 12:16:54

The system it not good, so you really have to play it using ICONS or other games.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Christmas Comes But Once a Year
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Capes, Cowls and Villains Foul -- Quickstart Preview
by Michael J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/03/2015 17:31:38

This quickstart expects us to understand rules and numbers it doesn't really explain. Yet gives the impression of overly complex mechanics one they will get explained.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Capes, Cowls and Villains Foul -- Quickstart Preview
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

CAH:S3 -- Galactic Heroes
by Michael J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/03/2015 17:23:50

Perfect set up of the worst series in cartoon history. As an example of what not to do it is perfect. As something to be rewritten into something logical and reasonable (OK, logical and reasonable for cartoons) it begs to be rewritten.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CAH:S3 -- Galactic Heroes
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 105 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates
Powered by DriveThruRPG