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Bounty Head Bebop
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/21/2019 12:43:14

“You know the first rule of combat? Shoot them before they shoot you.” - Faye Valentine, Cowboy Bebop.

Back in 1998 a new Anime appeared on the scene, something new called Cowboy Bebop. It dealt with the lives and misadventures of a group of bounty hunters in the solar system of the future that looked more like the wild west. There were guns, and terra-formed planets, a corrupt government, the mobs and of course lots of criminals. The crew of the Bebop spent their time doing jobs, keeping their ship together and avoiding starving. While this made for a great show in and of itself, the really cool thing about this were the characters. Larger than life, with secrets, agendas and a history of development that lead them to where they were at that point.

In other words a perfect setting for a Role Playing Game.

The game, Bounty Head Bebop, obviously takes some cues from the series. (AN ASIDE. I understand that this game was supposed to have been an officially licensed product, but I do not have anything to support that with. So instead of explaining all the time why they are the same, let’s just say they are cut from the same cloth and move on from there.)

Bounty Head Bebop (BHB), is a game where you can spend your time flying around a terra-formed solar system hunting down “bounty heads” for fun and profit. The game itself is a slick little RPG with a fun cinematic feel to it. It does what it says on the tin, and does it well.

BHB uses a system called the Inverted 20 system. Basically you have a Target Number (often set by the GM, with guidance), that is modified by ability, skill and or difficulties, your job is to roll that score or under (and different things happen if you hit the number or roll under). The die mechanic is really that simple. Anyone familiar with d20 will catch on fairly quickly despite the roll under mechanic. Now I will be honest, I am not a fan of roll under systems, but I think it works here. To me it seems that Anime based games work best as roll-under. Maybe it is all of those years of BESM or maybe it because it just provides me with a different feel.

Like other d20 games you attributes that despite the name changes look familiar, skills, various edges and flaws, all which work like GURPS. No need to reinvent the wheel, they work fine. Everything is point buy and you spend XP to raise them, like Unisystem.

Details BHB does something REALLY nice here. Puts in a Character Creation Summary so you can get an overview of everything you need to do. Figure out everything in order. Attributes look familiar if you have been playing any game at all. They are scored from 1 to 5 for starting characters, but can go up. Imitative and Movement are derived. As are Saves, Wounds and Vitality points. All pretty simple to figure out.

Skills are next and they are divided up into General, Combat and Specialty. General skills are your everyday skills and like d20 are tied to a specific attribute. Combat skills allow you to fight. Want to be better at aiming or hitting with your fists, then improve the skill. Specialty and Advanced skills are those that you can’t do unless you have a level/points in them. Advanced skills are like advanced sciences.

Edges and Flaws work like GURPS or any other point buy system, though there are no points. You start out with 3 Edges and get up to 6 with 3 more Flaws. Edges can be bought with XPs and Flaws bought off. The list is pretty typical, your Hard to Kill, various “Gun Fu” moves, various pilot and criminal related Edges too. The list looked good and nothing jumped out at me as not being there. There are also various new Psychic/Feng-Shui powers too (details in a bit). And some computer related ones, with the promise of new book dedicated to hacking and the net (for your own “Radical” Edward Wong Hau Pepelu Tivrusky the IV). Now you don’t need to take any Flaws at all if you don’t want, but I think that might be missing the point of this game really. These characters are yes over the top Anime characters, but they also have issues.

Feng-Shui gets it own chapter and it is the province of the Inuit Indians (yeah, that confuses me too, but I’ll go with it). None of the powers seem out of control, so no anime style Ki based special fx here, but a lot of good solid powers. Danger Sense, Locate Objects, manipulate objects, things like that. More power masters can influence minds or regenerate their bodies. There are seven areas of power (spheres) you choose one and you progress through it. It reminds me of the pschic powers from AFMBE’s “Enter the Zombie”. Given that, an ability to bend bullets might be cool in this game. Of course with power comes psychotic episodes. Do it too much and you WILL go crazy, just like they said.

Given this chapter I can see, and hope that the cyber book works the same way.

A money and equipment chapter follows. Money, though very important to the focus of the game, is game mechanic rather than collected. Similar to D20 Modern in a way. And of course lots of guns, spaceships and other things you need, like food and permits. While money is always going to be an issue, since that is the primary motivation of the characters, doing the system like this was a nice cinematic way of dealing with things.

A chapter on “doing things” follows after that. It is your basic rules chapter, but most things are handled with the same mechanic, so this chapter breezes by. I appreciate transparency in my games. “You can do this and this is how you do it.” BHB takes the basic d20 system and really streamlines it to it’s barest essentials (even more so than True20) yet nothing seems lost. Thus this chapter is very short.

Combat is more involved, since the bounty heads aren’t likely to go quietly. The combat chapter is again, easy to read and uses the same simple mechanics. Skills and your rank in them are what is important here. This sets it off from the d20 crowds and puts it back into GURPS/Unisystem territory. In a neat twist you can use the same “to hit” roll as a damage roll, thus speeding up your games. There is logic in this and I like the effect.

The Setting Chapter both pleased me and irritated me. The solar system is the setting with a nearly uninhabited Earth and terra-formed planets and moons. Briefly object hits the Moon, destroys it, sends Earth into chaos where meteors rain every day. But some of those rocks were used to jump gate tech to allow quick travel throughout the solar system and was a key element in terra-forming.

Now humanity is all over the system. There is a real wild west feel to the plaents. Mars is the center of human population now, Venus is like a giant mob controlled Vegas, the moons of Jupiter have food production and so on and all have their own hazards. There is a Solar System wide police force, but they are few, overworked, underpaid and spread too thin. This gives us lots of crime and the opportunity for bounty hunters (like you!) to capture bad guys and bring them in for fun and profit. Mostly for profit.

What irritated me was that this chapter was so short. Sure, I know it is so I can later buy the Mars book or the Io book, but it just touched the surface. Yeah I could go back to the anime (or other shows, Blake’s 7 comes to mind) for ideas. But I was enjoying reading when it was over.

The book has a very nice index, a character sheet that looks familiar to us all and a summary page on how to spend XPs. But the coolest thing is the included adventure in the back. Gets you and going on your first Bounty Head hunt in no time. The adventure itself is good, and even shows you what can be done with the system in terms of story. Sure this could have been a simple bounty hunt, but this one has moral layers and corruption and the hosts of a “Big Shots” like show (nice touch).

What Did I Like? Simple system, very easy to figure out. Plus it was also easy to figure out what to do with the game. Concepts came with every page (more or less). The book itself has a nice simple layout and it is easy to find everything. Plus it “reads” well too. The text is concise and gets right to the point. I also like the Luck and Surge points, which are basically like Drama Points or Hero Points.

What Didn’t I Like? Still not a fan of roll under mechanics. They seem wrong to me. Would have loved more setting information and some basic computer hacking rules.

Other Notes Art. The art is nice, but a lot of it is used again throughout the book. Pictures of some of the planets would be nice, what does Venus Vegas look like? How about the domes of Mars? That sort of thing.

What Can I do with This? Well there is basic premise, go out and hunt bad guys. But there are plenty of other ideas. The Stainless Steel Rat: Play the bad guys. Sure hunting them is fun, but wouldn’t it be more fun to be the bad guy or the mobsters avoiding the SSPB and the Bounty Hunters? Reservoir Dogs: You get pulled into a heist gone really, really wrong. The Usual Suspects: You bring in your small fry bounty head only to uncover that maybe, maybe the most notorious criminal mastermind might be involved or even one of your marks. Witch Hunter Bebop: Let’s combine Sunrise’s two best anime ever, Cowboy Bebop and Witch Hunter Robin and make a game where you need to hunt down marks using their Feng-Shui powers illegally. Firefly: Yeah it has a game and I really like Cortext, but I’ll be blunt here. There is nothing in Firefly that Cowboy Bebop didn’t do first and better and with a better soundtrack. You can do the same here. Plus the solar system of BHB makes more sense.

Who should get this? If you like Anime or space adventures with bullets rather than lasers then this is your game. If you want to do something like Traveler but don’t want the overhead of the system or the mega-plot then this is your game. You might be able to do “Star Wars” or “Star Trek” but we have better choices for those games. This would be perfect for “Buck Rodgers” or “Flash Gordon” though and of course “Cowboy Bebop”.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Bounty Head Bebop
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Chris Perrin's Mecha
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/25/2016 20:00:32

This is a finely written game that allows any anime giant robot (or armored suit) type of setting you would like to try. Using the combat circle takes a bit of getting used to but the abstract nature allows for everything from simple skirmish encounters to full on city invasions. The focus stays on the characters and the unique, structured role playing cycle allows every character to get a moment in the sun. Three settings, called "setting Reference Schematic" or SRS, are given with great intros and enough detail to take a group right into some fascinating action. I was luck enough to play in a setting at KantCon in KC and discovered just how flexible the system was. Not only did we have four battles (from a simple skirmish to the climatic final battle) but we went through three full role playing rounds where everyone had a chance to explore the town, hunt down hidden agenda's, and even attempt to start a bar fight (which was ever more fun because the the character actually failed to do so - being laughed out of the bar!) Note that all this was acomplished, including the GM giving a full description of the setting and the game, in just four hours. I would probably not recommend the system for a long session as, being d6 based, it can get godlike fairly quickly as characters will quickly - in my evaluation - top out their skills. However for short campaigns of a half dozen sessions (like a single season) the game should be fresh and fun for all. The author even gives a good outline of how to get your group to help create, and thus invest in, the setting and story. Really good information1



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Chris Perrin's Mecha
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Chris Perrin's Mecha
by Matt L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/27/2015 14:09:22

I introduced this game to my playgroup recently, and it went over very well. The rules, while relatively simple, capture the 'feel' of the genre, and are elastic enough to allow total creative freedom while remaining balanced. The combat system is straightforward, and can be taught to a new player quickly. While there are some typos in the text, it is only a minor blemish on an otherwise stellar game. At $10, it is a steal.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thank you for your kind words. I would love to hear about the play session you had.
Chris Perrin's Mecha
by Antonio E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/08/2013 03:09:44

First of all, I am not going to repeat what other reviewers said: if you like the Mecha genre, there is probably no better product out there which offers the same mix of roleplaying and strategy and "crunch". But I want to address some things regarding the 2nd edition, and a few issues I had with the 1st edition.

So what's new in 2e?

1) It's still the same game, which is a good thing. Sadly, the author doesn't specify what's really new. On a cursory reading, I couldn't find any difference in the rules; perhaps it's in some Mecha configuration or some other little detail? It would be useful if the author produced a small document which tracks the changes. I have already a print-out of the 1st edition with which I am familiar, and it would be nice if I could avoid to print it out again.

2) Despite the fact that an editor was hired for this new edition, the number of typos has not been reduced drastically. On a random sampling of pages throughout the book, I reckon less than half the typos has been corrected. And the number of typos in the 1st edition numbered at an average of approximately 2 per page. That's really, really annoying. PLUS, there is a boat load of page XX references. 31, to be precise (and what's worse, they are in the cheat sheet which is supposed to be helpful.) That's just sloppy editing. The layout on the other hand is better, and a few glitches in the graphical presentation have been fixed.

So, all in all this 2nd edition needs work, perhaps more than the 1st edition did (at least there weren't any page XX references.) I am only giving a rating of 3 because of the presentation and the annoying typos, and the lack of a "what's new" list.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Hey Antonio, thanks for taking the time to review Mecha. Strangely enough, the biggest changes with this version was supposed to be the cover and typo correction. It looks like we have a ways to go on the typos. Anyway, I hope you got an email, but if not, I uploaded a new version with the XX page numbers replaced with actual page numbers. I hope you like it better!
Eldritch Races - Runeborn
by Sean H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/16/2013 14:28:00

Eldritch Races: Runeborn presents (surprise!) a new race for Pathfinder, the Runeborn are accidental exiles from the moon and are bonded with lunar silver making them half-constructs thus able to survive in inhospitable habitats such as their home. They are an intriguing race well suited to play as adventurers or be encountered in unusual and unexpected locations. The Runeborn has an interesting set of abilities, mostly from their status as half-constructs but also due to them being tied to both the moon and the magic of words. The society of the Runeborn is sketched out as is their relation with other races and religions allowing them to be easily adapted into a setting. Supporting the race are variant racial abilities (and examples of how they can be expressed in as racial subtypes), favored class options, five new feats, one piece of new equipment (only of use to the Runeborn) and a new spell round out the product giving a good amount of material to work with. The author includes the Advance Race Guide’s scale of points to show how the racial mechanics fit together and where they are in relation to the abilities of others races while another sidebar talks about other useful character options from non-core Pathfinder books. Overall, the Runeborn are an unusual race but one with considerable possibilities for use in a campaign.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch Races - Runeborn
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MECHA - Quickstart
by william b. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/04/2011 10:44:44

look good so far, havent really had a chance to get into the systems though



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
MECHA - Quickstart
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Chris Perrin's Mecha
by Nathan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/12/2011 19:57:59

I love this game. It is my all-time favourite mecha RPG. It really captures the feel of anime mecha battles and does what other mecha games have failed to do, intergrating the character interactions with the combat system so they both have an effect on each other. This is certainly low on the "crunch" scale or mecha RPG's, but is all the better for it. It focuses your attention on the pilots, their relationships and their goals. I also really like the tactical "bullseye" map used to manouvre mechs. It is simple and straightforward to use, but offers enough tactical depth to make combat interesting. A really well made game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Chris Perrin's Mecha
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Chris Perrin's Mecha
by Tun K. P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/21/2010 10:11:33

Ever since I've started preferring lighter systems, Chris Perrin's Mecha RPG has become one of my favorites. Combat is still tactical enough that your choices matter, and there's just enough differentiation between different mecha to make any two characters (and their mecha) distinct in their combat styles. But it's definitely a much simpler system, and fairly influenced by indie design elements like scene framing. I've ported Heavy Gear to this system and it works great. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mecha - SRS Paper Minis - Steel Gunner
by Michael H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/29/2010 02:06:33

Although Steel Gunner paper minis are designed to be accessory for the Mecha RPG, they're generic enough to use for almost any anime-styled mecha game. The PDF includes 6 different mecha minis, along 10 character minis (including one in power armor). The product is black & white line art, although the characters are shaded in varying shades of grey. The art is quite good - the character art excellent with very good detail and shading. The mecha art is decent but somewhat washed out and flat looking since they're strictly B&W line drawings without any shading.

Overall, given the low price, I think these paper minis are a great value and well worth purchasing for anyone looking for some mecha minis on the cheap.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mecha - SRS Paper Minis - Steel Gunner
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Chris Perrin's Mecha
by Erathoniel W. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/16/2010 23:30:23

Really, there's one thing I have to ask you, the reader:

Why don't you have this?

At $12, this is quite possibly the only Mecha game you'll ever need. The rules are simple, but contain all that you need for a rough-and-ready mecha campaign.

I like the multiple-die success system, which I personally believe is the way to play. So get this! It's cheap, and it's good. Decent art, bland but forgivable typesetting, it's all good. It's a good game for the whole family, as well, due to its simplicity, but it's not by any means so simple as to be only part of a game.

I give it a five-star rating, just because it's got everything I look for in a mecha game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Chris Perrin's Mecha
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MECHA - Quickstart
by Antonio E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2010 04:28:34

I won't write a the detailed description since other people did it already. I will only add that this seems the perfect tool to reproduce mecha anime action in a fast and true-to-the-genre way. I am in the process of preparing a mecha sci-fi campaign based on the Universal Century timeline (Gundam), and I have been considering the options as to which game to use, the main contenders being Mekton Z and Jovian Chronicles. Well, if Mecha here will allow customisation of mecha and characters in a reasonably complete way, it will be my game of choice replacing those classics above. It's THAT good! Brilliant game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
MECHA - Quickstart
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MECHA - Quickstart
by Nathan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/27/2010 16:01:53

Mecha is the best mecha RPG I have seen, hands down. I have struggled for years looking for or trying to shoe-horn other games to capture the feel of mecha anime, but too often they are either RPG's that get bogged down in the mechanical details of mecha construction, or tactical simulations with roleplaying elements tacked on. Not so in this product. Here we have a game that is built from the ground up to handle both roleplaying and tactical combat with simple, straightforward rules. Play is divided into episodes and each episode is broken into a "personal scene" and a "combat" scene. In Personal scenes each character has a spotlight scene doing something you are interested in. I particularly like how "success" in a roleplay scene gives you a bonus in a future combat scene. In combat scenes you put down a "bullseye" map and play out the tactical encounter. Rules such as "overdrive" and "cut scenes" mean that the cool action and description don't end when you put the map down though - when you roll really well you get another spotlight scene to describe the awesome thing your character just did! Overall, I am impressed; The personal scenes are very roleplay driven - there is only ever one die roll made, at the end of the scene, and players who don't have a character in the scene get to be the "npc's"; Combat is tactical but not overly complex (it concentrates on the important "scenes" and doesn't get bogged down); And the sample mecha are pretty damn cool! I am really looking forward to the full game - check out this quickstart NOW!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
MECHA - Quickstart
by Andy H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2010 19:49:47

I've seen products which attempted to emulate the anime genre by taking some generic system and slapping the "anime" label on it. Yes, some systems do add in features which resemble anime elements...but there's still something missing. I was somewhat expecting more of the same from this product, but something in me was curious, and so I took a look. The cover alone was enough to grab my interest. That's one hardcore mecha.

In my mind, any system which attempts to emulate anime (when I say "anime", I'm using it as the standard American uses it, being the action-centered shounen variety of anime) should be quick and snappy, with plenty of room for cool, and the ever-essential "character berserk drive mode", where a character has a burst of intense action and epicness.

This system fulfills all of that. It's a dual-dimension dice pool mechanic. Stats give you dice to roll, skills give you a difficulty to roll against. The elegance of the system is stunning. There's also a resource called "Overdrive", which you get for rolling lots of successes at a time. Roll enough successes, and you actually get a "moment of awesome" to narrate, and some bonus oomph to boot. But that's not all...

The actual game structure is brilliant. It's divided up into episodes, just like any good anime. In the first part of each episode, characters roleplay character-interaction scenes. The characters do stuff, and in doing so gain resources which can be used in the second half of the episode, which is combat. So, you have character development first, and follow it with a conflict. This snap structure to episodes does a great job of emulating the feel of the anime genre. It's also a very short structure. The rules suggest that you could play through 6 to 8 episodes in a session, which means that over four sessions, you can play through a 26-episode plot arc.

As for Combat? Slick and streamlined. The game uses an abstract "Bullseye Battle Map" to mark battlefield position. I think that's very cool. It makes for tactical decisions, and lets you describe actions in a vague sort of manner, which befits a genre where giant robot suits are constantly maneuvering around one another. No bogging down in strict realism here! Total annihilation is also not required to win the conflict, another plus.

All in all, this looks to be a superb product. I can't wait to see what it looks like in its final form.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Bounty Head Bebop
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/15/2009 12:29:11

Without further ado, Chapter 1: The Basics launches into explaining that Bounty Head Bebop is all about fast-paced anime-style solar-system-hopping bounty hunters, and before you've got your breath back details the 'inverted D20' game mechanic used. This is designed to be fast and simple, yet able to deliver action both cinematic and gritty. Basically, you roll under a target number on a D20, with some harder tasks requiring that you also exceed a minimum target number as well; with an additional twist that you can use - when appropriate - the 'unit' number of the roll to calculate damage thus eliminating the need for a second die roll. And so - still on the first page! - to character creation, with six abilities that reflect the character's physical and mental prowess. Characters also have skills, edges and flaws, saves, vitality, and so on; and may have psychic powers or develop Feng Shui mastery as well. Despite the breakneck speed at which everything is addressed, it's explained clearly and is easy to follow. The chapter ends with experience, and how to use it... so even before your character starts, you have some idea of how you can develop him.

Chapter 2: Skills goes through the skills in detail. There are four types: general, combat, specialty and advanced. Anyone can have general skills, and most people can make an attempt at performing them even if their level is low. Specialty skills general require training of some kind before yo can use them, while advanced skills involve high levels of education. There follows comprehensive listings, explaining the skills available, what they let the character do and, from the game mechanics point of view, how to apply them. There's also a list of commonly-spoken languages, and where in the solar system you are likely to hear them.

And so, on to Chapter 3: Edges and Flaws. Many of these will be innate to the character, but some can be trained for (or out of) by spending experience points and perhaps a bit of role-playing later on. Combat edges can usually be acquired by training, but general ones are less likely to be got after initial character creation. Flaws are, as you'd imagine, potentially disadvantageous, but can lead to some good role-playing, and some can be overcome by a combination of role-playing and experience point expenditure.

Next, Chapter 4: Feng-Shui Powers explores the 'magic equivalent' of this system. Having taken the Feng-Shui Master edge, characters then have to learn (spend experience points on) the various powers in strict order, as well as acquire a lopan (traditional feng-shui dial). The powers are quite simple, but applied with cunning will prove useful to the character choosing to take this path. Chapter 5: Psychic Powers follows, these are more diverse powers of the mind which are divided into seven spheres - the character must choose one and all his psychic powers fall into that one. Again, powers must be gained in a strict order. Some quite dramatic and handy effects can be produced by the skilled practitioner... but there's a downside, the character risks losing his sanity as soon as he begins to develop his psychic powers - and has to roll EVERY time he uses one to avoid some nasty effect. The more powers he knows, the greater the chance of a problem.

That's character generation out of the way. Next comes Chapter 6: Money & Equipment, probably one of the first things this new-minted character's going to be interested in. However, the chapter begins by discussing money as plot device. In a cinematic game, you don't want to account for every last detail, so it can be assumed that the characters generally have sufficient for day-to-day living - but for those special purchases, even if you have the money, is it available? What you're after may be rare or illegal... so you have to find a supplier and strike a deal. Next comes some weapons lists. There's a fair range of items, although they are generic - this is not a list for the gun-bunny. There are also lists for clothing and assorted equipment, including medical costs and the scale of charges for hiring a specialist, along with vehicles including spacecraft.

Although the rule mechanics have been explained as appropriate in the above chapters, Chapter 7: Doing Things brings it all together and lays out all the detail. Primed with this information, Chapter 8: Combat looks at the one area where formal task resolution is always necessary. It's pretty straightforward, beginning with a single initiative roll for the whole combat and proceeding round by round thereafter, everyone acting in turn (although there are mechanisms for pushing ahead or falling back in the order if desired). For those who like added detail, there is plenty of scope for area effects, modifiers for just about any situation and so forth. Naturally, the next bit is all about injuries and healing. There is also a section on vehicle and starship combat, with again pretty much all you need to know laid out clearly. Indeed, an impressive amount of information is packed into this chapter, well organised and clear to use.

Up til now, what we have is a slick cinematic near-future game which could be used for, well, just about any near-future adventure. Chapter 9: Setting Notes is designed to set the rules into the context of the Bounty Head Bebop setting, laying out what is going on in and providing the background for our adventures. The year is 2073AD, and the whole solar system has been altered by a stray comet which shattered Earth's moon into little bits. While hiding from the inevitable rocks hitting Earth it was discovered that they had strange powers, including the ability to form a wormhole to anywhere else in the solar system, so exploration began and most of the habitable bits were visited and settled. It's a wild and lawless setting, with underworld organisations and corporations vying for control and the Solar System Policing Bureau (SSPB) fighting a losing battle against crime and corruption. There's a summary of what the inhabited places are like to visit, along with the hazards to be found there. And the characters? Well, the SSPB is bogged down in its own bureaucracy, corruption and jurisdictional squabbles, so someone has to catch criminals and bring them to justice - hence the need for bounty hunters.

Next, Appendices demonstrate the character generation process, provide more information on awarding and spending experience, present a character sheet and round up with a comprehensive index. All done? Not quite...

There is an introductory adventure called "Small Fry" to get you started in your bounty hunting ways, a quest for a fellow who stole some milk homogenizing equipment... or was it? The clue trail to enable the neophyte hunters to discover the truth and the thief is quite neatly laid out, both the GM and the characters should be able to cope. It's a nice example of this kind of detective adventure layout, with clear indications of options of places to look, what you might find and the possibilities for follow-up and developing that line of investigation.

Overall, this is a well-developed game with plenty of potential, whether you want to stick to bounty hunting or develop into a more general near-future game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Bounty Head Bebop
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Bounty Head Bebop
by Jesse B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/15/2008 19:09:47

I just got this last week. I haven't had a chance to play yet, but I like what I see so far on an initial read through.

I love the source material and I really look forward to getting a game up and running. While only 130 pages, the rules are comprehensive and cover most situations that characters will encounter with not only an excellent selection of skills and equipment, but also vehicle combat rules, which can often be overlooked in core rules. Also, as the game is based on the d20 system and is published under the OGL, it should be pretty easy to talk 3.0/3.5 players into a game (or at least I hope). However, even if the OGL background, the rules are not your normal d20 fare. Instead, they appear to be simplified for speed of play while maintaining tactical options and good character generation options.

While the majority of the book is composed of rules, there is a nice discussion of the setting - laying out some key points and leaving a lot open for GM's to build on. While the included setting is pretty neat and great for playing games based on the source material, I am thinking the rules would be pretty good for a Jovian Chronicles game.

Overall, I think this product is a good value and my only real complaint is that I want more material!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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