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Fuck For Satan
by Ryan K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/10/2019 16:08:11

This is a great module but the main dungeon is purposefully unusable and this doesn't work on it's own. It's great to use as a way to spice up an existing village in a campaign. My suggestion is to have a less grissly end befall the children as that is a huge bummer and could be used to get a big laugh instead like the children are found shooting heroine or something.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fuck For Satan
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The Punchline
by Stefan B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/22/2019 23:08:25

Me: "You're just going to kill these guys without challenging them to personal combat?"

Player: "They don't deserve it. Clowns aren't knights."



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Punchline
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Death Frost Doom
by Dan F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/21/2019 17:27:31

A player's role in the module as written is basically an audience member, passively listening to creepy and gross descriptions until the GM tells them they lost.

The only reason I gave this 2 stars is because some of the atmosphere and ideas are cool enough that a GM with better design chops can pull them out and use them elsehwere, or fix this broken module.

Great opening atmosphere is tarnished by some weirdly silly and completely unnecessarily gross stuff. Needs to decide whether it's atmospheric gothic horror where the terror is in what you don't see, gross-out body horror trading on shock value, or whimsical 4th-wall-breaking silliness where you can play real world songs on an organ for in-game effects. The good ideas are incredibly good, the bad ideas are really bad. Also the adventure itself is very weak, with an unsatisfying "meant-to-lose" ending that you need to hack significantly if you aren't running it as a one-shot with players that don't mind "gotcha" moments and dying horribly. Crucially, there are basically no meaningful decisions for the players to make. It's basically a tour of a death cult's house before everything dies. The only things the players can do is make things worse.

If you're looking for imagination fuel for an ongoing campaign, this has some awesome ideas. If you're looking for a fatalistic one-shot that trades on its cult reputation, you could maybe run this as is just to say you did it. You'll get some cool moments, but even a few small changes would fix its significant flaws and preserve the good stuff. I had to severely rewrite most of the module when running it and it turned out great, but any mediocre adventure can turn out great when you heavily rewrite it.

As is, the module has cool scenery but is terrible as a game. The way to win is easy, "don't play". The way to survive is also easy "just leave". The way to survive if you don't do either is just "don't touch anything, don't interact with anything, just let the GM read the description then go to the next room". You miss out on a little treasure this way but as the module's own NPC says, the treasure isn't worth it compared to the risks and curses. It still amazes me how many module designers fall into these amateur traps of creating environments that don't want to be explored and punish the players for trying to... Play.

All that said, you WILL be supporting Zak S. if you buy this, and that guy is a monster. There are a lot, lot, lot of other great adventures out there written by people who aren't monsters. Buy those instead. I wrote this review to honestly praise this cool-but-overrated module's good sides so I could point out it's not so special you need to suspend your conscience in order to buy it. You don't, not at all. There are no shortage of great creators with spooky ideas out there. Support them instead.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Death Frost Doom
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Death Frost Doom
by Keir S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/31/2019 05:59:23

DFD is a module full of interesting scraps, combined into a module I can't honestly recommend to anyone. The best way to run this module is for your characters to see the mountain, think for a minute, then decide 'nah' and leave.

Is "dungeon that's not worth visiting at any level" an interesting concept for a module? Definitely, but it's one of those things that reads better than it would ever play. As-is, DFD is a great module to pillage for your own work. It's full of cool traps, chapter names like "Hell Vomits Its Filth", curses, monsters, and some amazing boss monsters. It's just a shame that the whole is worse than the sum of its parts.

...also for what it's worth, at least one of the authors on this is a thoroughly unpleasant person who doesn't deserve a cent of your money. That doesn't impact the writing, but I think it's worth knowing.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Better Than Any Man
by Itai A. R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/12/2019 02:27:37

One of the best products ever, I can't believe they're just giving it away FOR FREE



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Better Than Any Man
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No Rest for the Wicked
by Mel V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/10/2019 23:28:28

very interesting scenario if ar tve wring olce at the wronf time. easily adaptable



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
No Rest for the Wicked
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Blood in the Chocolate
by Meagan W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/26/2019 10:07:40

I had played in this adventure online. I thought it would be fun to run myself. After reading the entire adventure, I was suprised to see so much unconsentual sex. The DM who I played this game with left out that aspect, and I will be leaving that aspect out. It seems like it was just thrown in for the horror factor, and that's not ok. Which is too bad because it's otherwise very interesting, scary, and I loved the adaption of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Blood in the Chocolate
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LotFP Rules & Magic Free Version
by Caleb R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/12/2019 00:23:36

LotFP is one of the slickest OSR games out there, and the fact that this ruleset is available for free is awesome. I own the physical copy as well, and I would encourage anyone who enjoys the rules to do so - the art is phenomenal and the quality of the book is astounding (that binding is hardcore!).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
LotFP Rules & Magic Free Version
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Fuck For Satan
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/09/2019 05:18:09

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module clocks in at 34 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, leaving us with 31 pages of content, laid out in 6’’ by 9’’ (A5). I own the Pdf-version of this supplement, and one of my generous supporters has sent me the softcover print copy of this adventure for my edification as well (#114 of 666); while the gentleman in question did not tell me to review the book at my earliest convenience, I’ve had it for a while, and so figured, it’d be time to cover this.

This module contains a drawing of a penis-shaped creature. If that offends you, steer clear.

Anyways, the first thing you need to know, is that this module is a farce, or, depending on your tastes and humor, a satire/response. This is not a form of judgment, it is an observation of what this offers, as it is nigh impossible to take a look at this review in a vacuum; this is very much a result of the internet. What do I mean by this? Well, as you may have gleaned from my reviews of the early Lamentations of the Flame Princess material, I do like the radically dark nature of many of these modules; I enjoy the bleak horror/dark fantasy angle for the most part. Here’s the thing: Even before the shock-for-shock’s-sake angle became so pronounced among the modules, there were plenty of folks that reviewed LotFP material, and quite a few of them were offended in their sensibilities.

That is every person’s prerogative, of course. Where I start taking umbrage, though, is how these reviews conveyed their displeasure and dislike. I usually try to keep away from other reviews to avoid coloring my own opinions…however, here, it was nigh impossible to do so. You see, one can state that one doesn’t like the BDSM-like humiliation games one of the NPCs in “Better than any man” proposes. Totally valid! But they were not mandatory to solve the module. They were not a crucial component of the adventure. One can say that “The Monolith Beyond Space and Time” is nigh unbeatable for your average dungeon-crawling group, and this would also be correct in a way…though the latter is clearly by design, and by genre. (See my review of that one and the assumptions of dungeoncrawling fantasy vs. investigative and methodical horror gaming.) I don’t want to tell anyone their opinions aren’t correct. However, I did read a bit of the outrage reception, of how the modules were condemned for being too deadly, arbitrary, etc. – and I couldn’t help but feel that many of them, either deliberately or due to their perception being colored by a kneejerk outrage response, failed to see the point of these adventures. There were valid points of criticism, sure – but some also were simply unfair.

I am not sure if this module is a form of resignation or a deliberate trolling; if this is the response of a wounded ego or a troll, or a combination thereof. But much like a certain book about crystal-headed clone children, this module took all those criticisms and molded them into a module. It quite deliberately creates the bad adventure that the often brilliant earlier LotFP-modules the author penned were made out to be. This means a couple of things: We begin with a multi-page spanning rambling diatribe of a thoroughly unpleasant, old-man; including a bonus-rant for games that feature demi-humans. We have a dungeon that indeed is there to be a pretty random and frustrating meat-grinder par excellence, and this “You want to see bad? You think my modules did this and that? Well, there you go!” response oozes from every page, every concept. In a way, this could be seen as a deliberately disjointed rebuttal in module form.

But…how does it work? What exactly does it contain? Well, in order to discuss that, we have to go into SPOILER territory. Potential players should jump ahead to the conclusion. … .. . All right, so, this nominally takes place in the Swiss town of Schwarzton. This may in itself be a pun. The German composite “Schwarz + Ton” would mean “shade of black.” If the common English town suffix “-ton” is instead referred to, it is a deliberate step back from the careful research that went into “Better than any man”, for example – “-ton” is not added as a town-suffix in German. There is a general, isometric overland map of the vicinity sans scale provided. I already mentioned the rambling, sexist, racist old geezer that acts as the central hook for the module. You don’t have to be a rocket-scientist to notice that this is a deliberate construction of the things LotFP was accused of.

There are kids missing, and a Satanist cult might be responsible. The PCs are pointed towards a complex, and then, suffering commences. The complex, you see, is a deliberate, ridiculous negadungeon (a deadly dungeon that will see the PCs worse off for having mastered it, if at all still alive) of the hardest kind. It’s not Grimtooth-level of ridiculous and gonzo; it can be beaten if you are careful, lucky and really understand how its aesthetics of in-game logic work, but oh boy. Oh boy.

But before we get to the dungeon, let’s talk briefly about the meta-aspects that we can see in LotFP-modules. (E.g. the chariot in “The God That Crawls”) – I don’t particularly like them, but they’re easy enough to ignore, and some common sense and caution can make them work. Perhaps you’re one of the persons that liked them. That’s totally valid. The complaints fielded against them depicted them as random and breaking immersion, and thus, the complex is front-loaded with one instance where the PCs can find a handout/book and beseech Twinkly the Star (as from that kid’s song), who doesn’t like the referee making the life of poor PCs a living hell. As such, there are 6 different effects like open rolls, 3 truthful responses, etc. – and these genuinely may be required to have a realistic chance of getting out of this module alive. Referees could contact an e-mail address and get a retaliatory benefit, custom-tailored for the first 250, but since I got the print version of the module as a donation, I did not claim that aspect of it. Still, it generates a rapport, which is per se an interesting aspect, even though I personally really don’t like it. That being said, this module basically requires Twinkly for the PCs to have a chance in the dungeon.

The second rebuttal of the “So random” claims would be the by now infamous solution of the module – the complex, the cult? Red herrings. The culprit is a relatively smart bear. Kill the bear, folks are safe. It’s a random encounter. Whether you consider that to be stupid or genius depends on your personal aesthetics and that of your gaming group.

Anyhow, the dungeon. It’s basically a super-twisted kind of containment facility, engineered by the Duvan-Ku (responsible for Death Frost Doom and tied to Death Love Doom, so if your players know these modules, they’ll at least be warned…). In a vermin-invested pit, there is a secret passage that leads to a room with levers. 3 of them, which can be in 3 positions each. These levers influence doors, deadbolt and open them, etc., and the table of their effects is almost a whole page long. It is pretty random, and while theoretically the PCs can learn by trial and error how you have to use these levers, it’s basically just a huge amount of methodical trial and error. It is deliberately not fun. It, ironically, with Twinkly and magic, may well be solved, making it more functional than quite a few modules I’ve read.

The general notion of being a farce extends to the entities contained within: We have, for example, the Half-Realized Poorly-Conceived Terror, which was, unless I’m sorely mistaken, one of the scathing condemnations of earlier LotFP-modules. It’s basically text that can come alive as some form of half-finished art. The creature’s attacks, though, are interesting, capable of leaving tattoos, transform items (or facial features) into lines, and could be considered to be genuinely creative and interesting. The same applies to the other creatures herein, most of which do also get their neat one-page b/w-artworks. There is, for example, a massive maggot-thing, the luck-sucker, which can fart a die-chain debuff (reduce die-size); It can theoretically be slain, but yeah – it’s super-deadly, and at 8 HD, a veritable TPK machine. Like the whole complex.

You see, the main treasure may be valuable, but it also is a super-deadly trap that will annihilate even mid-level parties. There is a way to get it, but it is predicated on not having plundered the complex or the dead bodies inside – and where showing respect for the dead made sense in previous modules, here, it’s just what the critics claimed it’d be. Random.

There is another first here, and one I really dislike: Namely random PC humiliation. There is a creature in the complex (the sole critter sans artwork) that is basically indestructible – a disembodied consciousness that makes the PCs piss and shit themselves, and then animates the feces to attack. And no, PCs can’t be “emptied”; this is not telegraphed in any way. Unlike the “humiliation for information”-angle in “Better than any man”, this is just random humiliation for humiliation’s sake – there is no player agenda or the like. There also is a sadistic trap that can see the PCs caught on an endless stair, though that one is at least creative in its devious implementation.

So yeah, this dungeon is a random, ridiculously lethal meatgrinder. It is a negadungeon that really wrecks PCs to bits, and it is not fair. Even dungeon-crawling veterans may well be TPK’d and call BS on quite a few aspects of this dungeon. Exploration is discouraged actively. (Come to think of it – the horror-end/sub-level at the end of “Better than any man”? You know the one where the character’s DEITY tells them to go back? Isn’t the like pretty much what some folks erroneously claimed that one would be?)

The whole dungeon atop the haunted hill feels like a caricature of a combination of “Death Frost Doom” and “Better than any man” to me.

Anyhow, the cult. If the dungeon is a scathing troll of the claims re dungeon-design and structure, the cult is all about the gritty stuff that more prude people may be offended by. The cult is basically a sex-cult that worships the penis-walker. I never though I’d write those words in sequence. The penis-walker is a ginormous, walking penis-shaped alien, with retractable filaments coming from the head. The entity is actually misunderstood; it’s a potent telepath/empathy of sorts, and it releases emotions as clouds – which are thoroughly misinterpreted by the primitive human brain. The poor, crash-landed dick-alien just wants home to its mate (who is, as it can glean, coupling with another member of its species back home), and the humans and their orgies? They miss the point. Not that the PCs will ever know. It takes Intelligence 30 to understand the penis-walker and realize that the whole satanic cult thing is actually a horrible misunderstanding. So, it’ll be more likely that the PCs slay the 0 HD creature. How the cult takes this? No idea. Nor do we get stats for the pseudo-satanic sex cultists. But, as noted before, this is another red herring. One that the PCs probably only notice if they observe the village, as opposed to running into the death trap dungeon…

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to a 2-column b/w-standard, and the module sports quite a few nice b/w-artworks. The handout letter is nice, and so is the cartography. The map of the dungeon, alas, does not come with a player-friendly, key-less version. The print copy is stitch-bound, and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

James Edward Raggi IV’s “Fuck for Satan” is basically post-modernism at its most hipster-like, in a negative sense, coming finally to RPGs. It takes the whole aspect of meta-playfulness with the reader/referee/player, and wraps it in a trollish “So you think that’s what I wrote? Well, all right, I’ll give you the hack job my modules ostensibly are!” One can’t help but feel a certain degree of admiration regarding the 0-fucks given attitude here.

Or, well, it could come off as someone deeply wounded by the often unfair criticisms fielded against work that did ooze passion, that was often smart and intricately detailed.

Either way, the adventure is not meant to be enjoyed on any traditional level, save that of detached irony and appreciation of how it lampoons module-structure and narrative tropes. It is, then, a testament to how bad plenty of adventures are, that I can genuinely point towards a whole slew of them and state that this is still better.

Indeed, there are plenty of good ideas in this book – it is not uncreative or per se slapped together, and if you need ideas to scavenge, there are quite a few of them to be found here. The module is also less “Lol, random everyone dies 1111onelevelen!” than the crystal-headed

children adventure, and more skill-based. There is a way to solve this, and one that does make sense. Is this fun? No.

It’s not designed to be fun. It can be an amusing experience, but the target-demographic of this module is very, very narrow. Most groups and referees will probably consider this to be a curiosity; as for actual play: There are certainly super-jaded roleplaying games veteran cynics out there that are bored by most commercial modules, because they’re too easy. If you want to test your mettle as a party against a module that is deliberately designed to screw you over, then this will deliver. This is a module that is very much worth trying to win, chuckle about how your PCs horrifically died, and then move on – if that is what you’re looking for. I’d firmly advise against using this in an ongoing campaign, unless your players are the best, most lucky, brilliant and jaded RPG-players ever. As a one-shot? Yeah, I can see it being “fun” for a very select group of people.

As a final aside: I really wish the author would go back to writing modules that are not like, well, this one. How to rate this? Oh boy. If one were to rate this as a satire, it’d be one in the tradition of Juvenal. There is no redemption here, just scathing bile. It’s the only true farce of a roleplaying game module I know of, and it achieves its obvious goals.

Reading it on a meta-level, as a cynical deconstruction of criticisms, of narrative structures, this has some value. But as a whole, I wouldn’t consider it to be compelling in the sense that even folks that adored e.g. “Death Love Doom” will necessarily subscribe to. For most groups, this will be a curiosity at best, and probably one they will never actually play. That being said, for the exceedingly narrow target demographic that this may cater to, there might be serious fun to be drawn from it. As such, my final verdict will clock in at 2.5 stars, and while most folks should probably round down (I know I’d consider this, as a person, at best a 2-star offering…), there’s a chance that you and your group might just fit this very niche audience; as such, my official verdict will round up, mostly due to in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Fuck For Satan
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LotFP Referee Book (old Grindhouse Edition)
by Justin H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/30/2019 12:05:45

I have come back to roleplaying after 30 years away and was looking for an appealling system (mechanically and stylistically) with which to run a campaign. I was intending to skim this referee book (as I had done with the free Rules and Magic book) in order to find out whether this was the system for me but I found it very compelling and ended up reading it thoroughly.

The author has strong opinons on what makes a good adventure and a good campaign. I found this reassuring. It felt like a strong base to work from. Late in the book, the author acknowledges that differences in style will mean that the advice here is not for everyone, but up until that point the information had a "one true way" flavour that I liked,

My only criticism is that I would have liked to see contrasting right and wrong examples to illustrate the author's assertions. The sample adventure (which looks like a lot of fun!) was exactly what I thought I was being warned against because it seemed to have a lot of NPC interaction. I obviously misunderstood this point and wondered what else I misunderstood. This would not stop me from using the LotFP system and I intend to try it out with the sample adventure.

The book is written with he/him as default pronouns.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
LotFP Referee Book (old Grindhouse Edition)
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She Bleeds
by Zarion B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/29/2019 05:44:25

This might sound harsh but to me this was a complete waste of money. It's a very detailed and well written description of something I'll never use in a game and I don't see it as much us for inspirational material either.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
She Bleeds
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Lamentations of the Gingerbread Princess
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/07/2019 06:57:37

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This adventure clocks in at 20 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 17 pages of content, which are laid out in 6’’ by 9’’ (A5), which means you could fit up to 4 pages on a sheet of paper, so let’s take a look!

This is an adventure intended for characters level 1 – 4, and it is one that can have some high-impact consequences. It should be known that, at level 1 and 2, the likelihood of PC death is pretty high. Compared to many Lamentations-modules, the adventure is not as lethal, though. The OSR-rules-set employed is obviously LotFP (Lamentations of the Flame Princess). The module does not feature read-aloud text.

While it looks cutesy, this is a pretty dark adventure (big surprise!), so no, this does not belong in the hands of kids.

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump ahead to the conclusion. … .. . All right, only referees around? Great! So, King Connolly VI (or another minor king/lord/whatever have you…) is a bit of a racist prick. He started a pogrom against the local halfling populace…and only thereafter noticed that they made up for most of his income, being the manufacturers of luxury goods, apple brandy…and now the ruler wants the PCs to find the halflings that have escaped through the dark forest.

If you know Zzarchov Kowolski’s modules, you’ll notice a leitmotif here, and indeed, the first section of the adventure will have the PCs harry through the sheer endless forests. One encounter per 12 hours, different dice are used for day and night – and the exploration has an interesting angle: You see, the forest has a Dark Heart and actually hunts the PCs, at least in a way – depending on party composition, the dark heart will become more agitated…and it will be able to sooner or later form a dark avatar. From fearie knights to other, strange inhabitants, this first section is rather cool, but it should be noted that the stats are rudimentary: The statblocks note HD, armor in analogues (“armor as plate”), damage, and similar basics, but doesn’t provide the usual statblock segment we see in LotfP scenarios. It may not be issue for you, but it represents an unnecessary comfort-detriment for the referee. As a nitpick: The font used for the random encounters section is different. On the plus-side, we do get a rather interesting table of changes that are wrought upon PCs, should they choose to imbibe some potentially mutating mushrooms.

The module takes a complete 180° towards the weird promised by title and cover once the PCs find a hedge – moving through it will deposit them in basically a demiplane, where mild and honey literally flow. A candy-based place, where all the halflings have gone and no inhabit a gingerbread village in the shadow of an ivory tower. Obese and unhealthy, they smile neurotically, and indeed, from the pink poodles to the happy cupids flirting through the air to the teddy-bear patrol…this place is actually a nightmare.

The PCs will get to see as a halfling is rounded up, impaled, and then his guts are used for the happy, mandatory maypole dance – unless the PCs want to take up arms against the cutesy bringers of death. The fully mapped gingerbread village doesn’t offer much beyond this scene, though – no NPC personalities or the like.

Instead, the pdf pretty much clearly shows what the PCs are supposed to do – enter the ivory tower and confront the lord of the place – Mistysparkles. A pastel-blue unicorn with pink Pegasus wings. Who happens to be a true sadist. Alas, this fellow is far beyond the capabilities of the PCs to defeat, so smart players are required here. How did this place come to be? Well, you see, there is a portal towards an interstellar void, in which an idol stands. Devoted to a trickster god, it allows for wishes, but adds something to them – here, the result was “…or else!”, added to the wish for universal happiness. Mind you, clever players can actually deduce how this statue works! It should also be noted, that the module can end in a variety of ways. The girl that uttered the wish is actually kept drugged and docile. How to deal with here depends on your proclivities, but the wish must end in some way...

The module also features 5 different magic-user spells that are pretty interesting: Two of the deal with the gingerbread curse, which can make your hit point loss really hurt…or revert becoming cookie-like. As a cool aside: While partially gingerbread-ified, you will always outrun pursuers! That made me laugh. Nightmare fuel lets you animate toys with unholy life (hint: risky!), and there is an interesting spell called fireworks. It has you roll d6s for damage, but only 1s and 6s are applied…all others are rolled again next round, until they come up as 1s or 6s, making this hilariously chaotic. Rainbow bolt is another pretty chaotic spell, but it’s a direct damage spell, which feels a bit odd for LotFP. (There is also a wand for these included.)

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are good, but not as tight as usual for LotFP. Layout adheres to a 1-column b/w-standard, and the interior artwork…is b/w and okay. Very comic-like. This also holds true for the maps provided, which lack scale etc. They are not particularly useful and represent a weakness of the scenario. On the plus-side, the pdf comes with excessive bookmarks, making navigation easy. I only own the pdf version, so that’s the only one I can comment on. Zzarchov Kowolski’s “Lamentations of the Gingerbread Princess” is an interesting, hyperglycemic nightmare – at least in the second part. The first part is wood-crawling excellence, as expected by the author that brought us the fantastic “Gnomes of Levnec” and “A Thousand Dead Babies,” two dark-fantasy wood-crawls he released under his own label. That being said, apart from the sheer oddity of the second part of the module, there isn’t much going on within this weirdness – it ultimately just works as dressing for the encounters: There is not much going on in the second part of the adventure. The design as a free-form “This is what’s here, insert PCs” is great and all, but no matter how you use the second half, there isn’t much to work with, at least not without expanding the material on your own. All in all, I couldn’t help but feel that this one is weaker than the author’s other , aforementioned “Dark Wood”-focused adventures with weirdness sprinkled in. My final verdict will hence clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up due to in dubio pro reo – if you’re looking for a wacky, but dark baseline or a pretty quick to run/prepare scenario, this’ll deliver.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Lamentations of the Gingerbread Princess
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LotFP Rules & Magic Full Version
by david w. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/02/2019 19:31:00

I heard a lot of good things.. but I'm sorry, I find this ruleset unbelievably stupid. The HUMAN fighter is the only class that improves in combat ability. That includes Dwarves and Elves. After that I closed the book.

there are some interesting rules changes, and the art is really good... but I'm not going to be able to get past the silly fighter rules.

Also, the PDF opens up two pages at a time, making viewing it on a tablet, or actually printing it out impossible.



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[1 of 5 Stars!]
LotFP Rules & Magic Full Version
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She Bleeds
by Alexander D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/31/2018 18:43:00

This is a wonderfully creative RPG supplement, and a thoroughly enjoyable read to someone with the right sensibility for it. I don't know if this will ever see use in any of my gaming, just because it might not be to the taste of my group members, but who knows? Reading through this certainly nudged my attitudes towards some subject matter more positively just a little bit, and I had thought I was already a pretty open minded guy. It's inspired me to want to know a lot more about traditional witchcraft, the parts covered up by history as written by the winners. I'd go so far as to call it maybe the most valuable read I've ever had in an RPG supplement I can think of, even if its contents don't directly end up in my game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
She Bleeds
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Better Than Any Man
by Jorge J. V [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/10/2018 21:07:26

Is there such thing as perfection? If this module/sandbox/mini-setting is not the perfect product for your roleplaying games (OSR or otherwise), then it's the closest to be it.

There is a dark plot here, one that will happen whether the adventurers (PCs) take part in or not; oh, that doesn't mean the result will be the same, by god, no! It means that there is a story that happens if the players don't get involved, but getting involved will change the story, at least to a degree.

But they don't have to get involved if they don't want to, there are lots of stuff to be done in the area: exploring witched, fighting thieves, helping peasants (or abusing them), dethroning a "theocracy", profiting of other's misery, and more. What's not to love here?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Better Than Any Man
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