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Languard Locations: Beyond the Walls
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/03/2018 04:24:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Languard Locations-series clocks in at 16 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 10 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Well, first things first: This pdf does contain a list of author biographies in the back that spans 1.5 pages – and this is a damn good thing as far as I’m concerned. Freelancers have it tough, and such sections help generate name recognition, so kudos for that! And yes, locations are noted by designers. A handy list of the locations with brief descriptions is also provided on the final 0.5 page before the author bios – and it makes sense that it’s here.

Anyhow, we do begin this pdf is a slightly different manner: On the first page, we discuss the surrounding lands of the city of Languard – the plains, hills and sea are all described in details here, allowing you to get a feel for the vicinity. The excellent map of Tommi Salama is also provided, with the city proper grayed out to highlight the locations that this pdf covers – you know, the ones outside the walls. A total of 12 such locations are presented.

As before in the series, each location does come with notable folks presented in a fluff-only manner. Only race and an approximate level suggestion as well as gender and alignment are stated. The PFRPG version, courtesy of the variations of the system, is the most versatile in these suggestions. Beyond that, each of the locales does come with one or more specific adventuring hooks, designed to kick off a diverse array of possibilities.

And this is where I need to interject something: As much as I enjoy Raging Swan Press’ gritty and down to earth style, I freely admit to being worried about this pdf. Why? Because the style is contingent on a sense of realism, and which places to put in front of the city, beyond the walls, can have pretty tangible effects and contradict what we know of medieval structures. So, does this break the conceit established by the series?

Well, the first location certainly makes sense: Tor’s Tannery does belong outside the walls. Historically, being a tanner was considered to be an unclean profession in Judeo-Christian influenced culture, and the scents emitted from tanning…well, let’s just say that it makes sense that it’s outside the walls. Tanneries aren’t depicted often enough, and this one actually has an interesting angle as well…not all is as it must seem. And before you ask: No, for once, the Tors are not the cliché standard serial killers/evil cultists. To the north of Languard’s walls, situated at the cliffs, a prophet of the churning waves makes proclamations of repentance and doom, hiding his name beyond the moniker of being the Mouthpiece of the Waves – and his message is gaining traction.

Gallen’s Lost Manor, a many-winged monstrosity of a mansion, makes for a perfect example of the sense of decrepitude that suffuses Raging Swan Press supplements so often; it is inhabited by the last member of the Gallen family, though, oddly, he does have a lot of visitors – who curiously can’t ever remember much about their visits. Now if you can’t make something creepy out of that one, I don’t know. Pungent Grove, maintained by an unhinged halfling druid, is a place that thrives on the refuse of Languard – though, once more, there is more to this than a story of an addled mind with a massive cockroach pet…

The Mother’s Garden is a megalithic open air farmer’s temple that focuses ritualistic power via Stonehenge like rings, a formation of ancient trees and cottages tended by the Daughters – a title that made me flash back to the classic 70s version of Wicker Man. But that may just be me. The Twisted Wreath is amazing: An ancient oak, once a hanging tree, now split by a bolt from the skies, bent by the weight of curses and sorrow, watched my Mother Illona, who crafts poppets and hangs them on the tree – cursing those that the poppets represent. This is amazing.

Heckler’s Hall is unique – part mobile circus, part jester’s academy and part rent-a-riot, this locale is led by the gnome Satu Tylik, and most assuredly makes for an interesting foil…or tool regarding the politicking going on in the city. There would also be a capable freight operation that is bound to have some gainful work for adventurers, and an out of city boarding house also makes sense: After all, the gates won’t be open all the time! Weary travelers can find the vandalized shrine of a barbaric god, tended by a lone caretaker, and just south of Languard, a stone shack is pierced by a mighty olive tree, where a rail-thin and pockmarked misanthrope sells herbs. The aptly-named Outside Inn is a traveler’s place that can be a great source of information when visiting Languard for the first time.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports solid b/w-artworks. The cartography is great, and the city backdrop supplement does have a player-friendly version. The pdf is fully bookmarked and comes in two versions – one optimized for screen-use and one that has been optimized for the printer.

This pdf is the work of a surprising amount of authors: Christopher Bunge, Sam Cameron-McKee, Kim Frandsen, Christopher Hunt, Aaron King, Ben Martin, Rebecca McLaren, Hilary Moon Murphy, Adam Ness, Treyson Sanders, Kris Vezner, John Whyte. It is surprising, then, to note how unified the content feels. The locations outside of the walls are intriguing and captivating, blending the rural and the more metropolitan. Personally, I think that the entries that directly reference in some way Languard’s dynamics are the strongest. Where a sense of realism is enforced by businesses or dubious characters, where refuse makes for a disgusting grove, where enigmatic mansions may present a shadowy puppeteer behind the scenes, this is where the pdf excels. It is surprising, considering how many of these authors are names I don’t regularly encounter among my reviews, how refined and intriguing these entries are. So, all awesome? Well…almost. A couple of locations are off the map, and some traveling distance from the city gates would have been nice, but, as a whole, this is indeed a very good supplement. As such, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: Beyond the Walls
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for the review, End. I'm delighted you are enjoying our look at Languard!
Languard Locations: Beyond the Walls (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/03/2018 04:23:40

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Languard Locations-series clocks in at 16 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 10 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Well, first things first: This pdf does contain a list of author biographies in the back that spans 1.5 pages – and this is a damn good thing as far as I’m concerned. Freelancers have it tough, and such sections help generate name recognition, so kudos for that! And yes, locations are noted by designers. A handy list of the locations with brief descriptions is also provided on the final 0.5 page before the author bios – and it makes sense that it’s here.

Anyhow, we do begin this pdf is a slightly different manner: On the first page, we discuss the surrounding lands of the city of Languard – the plains, hills and sea are all described in details here, allowing you to get a feel for the vicinity. The excellent map of Tommi Salama is also provided, with the city proper grayed out to highlight the locations that this pdf covers – you know, the ones outside the walls. A total of 12 such locations are presented.

As before in the series, each location does come with notable folks presented in a fluff-only manner. Only race and an approximate level suggestion as well as gender and alignment are stated. In the 5e iteration of the file, these pieces of information point towards the proper NPC default stats. Beyond that, each of the locales does come with one or more specific adventuring hooks, designed to kick off a diverse array of possibilities.

And this is where I need to interject something: As much as I enjoy Raging Swan Press’ gritty and down to earth style, I freely admit to being worried about this pdf. Why? Because the style is contingent on a sense of realism, and which places to put in front of the city, beyond the walls, can have pretty tangible effects and contradict what we know of medieval structures. So, does this break the conceit established by the series?

Well, the first location certainly makes sense: Tor’s Tannery does belong outside the walls. Historically, being a tanner was considered to be an unclean profession in Judeo-Christian influenced culture, and the scents emitted from tanning…well, let’s just say that it makes sense that it’s outside the walls. Tanneries aren’t depicted often enough, and this one actually has an interesting angle as well…not all is as it must seem. And before you ask: No, for once, the Tors are not the cliché standard serial killers/evil cultists. To the north of Languard’s walls, situated at the cliffs, a prophet of the churning waves makes proclamations of repentance and doom, hiding his name beyond the moniker of being the Mouthpiece of the Waves – and his message is gaining traction.

Gallen’s Lost Manor, a many-winged monstrosity of a mansion, makes for a perfect example of the sense of decrepitude that suffuses Raging Swan Press supplements so often; it is inhabited by the last member of the Gallen family, though, oddly, he does have a lot of visitors – who curiously can’t ever remember much about their visits. Now if you can’t make something creepy out of that one, I don’t know. Pungent Grove, maintained by an unhinged halfling druid, is a place that thrives on the refuse of Languard – though, once more, there is more to this than a story of an addled mind with a massive cockroach pet…

The Mother’s Garden is a megalithic open air farmer’s temple that focuses ritualistic power via Stonehenge like rings, a formation of ancient trees and cottages tended by the Daughters – a title that made me flash back to the classic 70s version of Wicker Man. But that may just be me. The Twisted Wreath is amazing: An ancient oak, once a hanging tree, now split by a bolt from the skies, bent by the weight of curses and sorrow, watched my Mother Illona, who crafts poppets and hangs them on the tree – cursing those that the poppets represent. This is amazing.

Heckler’s Hall is unique – part mobile circus, part jester’s academy and part rent-a-riot, this locale is led by the gnome Satu Tylik, and most assuredly makes for an interesting foil…or tool regarding the politicking going on in the city. There would also be a capable freight operation that is bound to have some gainful work for adventurers, and an out of city boarding house also makes sense: After all, the gates won’t be open all the time! Weary travelers can find the vandalized shrine of a barbaric god, tended by a lone caretaker, and just south of Languard, a stone shack is pierced by a mighty olive tree, where a rail-thin and pockmarked misanthrope sells herbs. The aptly-named Outside Inn is a traveler’s place that can be a great source of information when visiting Languard for the first time.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports solid b/w-artworks. The cartography is great, and the city backdrop supplement does have a player-friendly version. The pdf is fully bookmarked and comes in two versions – one optimized for screen-use and one that has been optimized for the printer.

This pdf is the work of a surprising amount of authors: Christopher Bunge, Sam Cameron-McKee, Kim Frandsen, Christopher Hunt, Aaron King, Ben Martin, Rebecca McLaren, Hilary Moon Murphy, Adam Ness, Treyson Sanders, Kris Vezner, John Whyte. It is surprising, then, to note how unified the content feels. The locations outside of the walls are intriguing and captivating, blending the rural and the more metropolitan. Personally, I think that the entries that directly reference in some way Languard’s dynamics are the strongest. Where a sense of realism is enforced by businesses or dubious characters, where refuse makes for a disgusting grove, where enigmatic mansions may present a shadowy puppeteer behind the scenes, this is where the pdf excels. It is surprising, considering how many of these authors are names I don’t regularly encounter among my reviews, how refined and intriguing these entries are. So, all awesome? Well…almost. A couple of locations are off the map, and some traveling distance from the city gates would have been nice, but, as a whole, this is indeed a very good supplement. As such, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: Beyond the Walls (5e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for the review, End. I'm delighted you are enjoying our look at Languard!
Languard Locations: Beyond the Walls (SNE)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/03/2018 04:22:15

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Languard Locations-series clocks in at 16 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 10 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Well, first things first: This pdf does contain a list of author biographies in the back that spans 1.5 pages – and this is a damn good thing as far as I’m concerned. Freelancers have it tough, and such sections help generate name recognition, so kudos for that! And yes, locations are noted by designers. A handy list of the locations with brief descriptions is also provided on the final 0.5 page before the author bios – and it makes sense that it’s here.

Anyhow, we do begin this pdf is a slightly different manner: On the first page, we discuss the surrounding lands of the city of Languard – the plains, hills and sea are all described in details here, allowing you to get a feel for the vicinity. The excellent map of Tommi Salama is also provided, with the city proper grayed out to highlight the locations that this pdf covers – you know, the ones outside the walls. A total of 12 such locations are presented.

As before in the series, each location does come with notable folks presented in a fluff-only manner. Only race and an approximate level suggestion as well as gender and alignment are stated. In the system neutral version, proper old-school class names are noted. Beyond that, each of the locales does come with one or more specific adventuring hooks, designed to kick off a diverse array of possibilities.

And this is where I need to interject something: As much as I enjoy Raging Swan Press’ gritty and down to earth style, I freely admit to being worried about this pdf. Why? Because the style is contingent on a sense of realism, and which places to put in front of the city, beyond the walls, can have pretty tangible effects and contradict what we know of medieval structures. So, does this break the conceit established by the series?

Well, the first location certainly makes sense: Tor’s Tannery does belong outside the walls. Historically, being a tanner was considered to be an unclean profession in Judeo-Christian influenced culture, and the scents emitted from tanning…well, let’s just say that it makes sense that it’s outside the walls. Tanneries aren’t depicted often enough, and this one actually has an interesting angle as well…not all is as it must seem. And before you ask: No, for once, the Tors are not the cliché standard serial killers/evil cultists. To the north of Languard’s walls, situated at the cliffs, a prophet of the churning waves makes proclamations of repentance and doom, hiding his name beyond the moniker of being the Mouthpiece of the Waves – and his message is gaining traction.

Gallen’s Lost Manor, a many-winged monstrosity of a mansion, makes for a perfect example of the sense of decrepitude that suffuses Raging Swan Press supplements so often; it is inhabited by the last member of the Gallen family, though, oddly, he does have a lot of visitors – who curiously can’t ever remember much about their visits. Now if you can’t make something creepy out of that one, I don’t know. Pungent Grove, maintained by an unhinged halfling druid, is a place that thrives on the refuse of Languard – though, once more, there is more to this than a story of an addled mind with a massive cockroach pet…

The Mother’s Garden is a megalithic open air farmer’s temple that focuses ritualistic power via Stonehenge like rings, a formation of ancient trees and cottages tended by the Daughters – a title that made me flash back to the classic 70s version of Wicker Man. But that may just be me. The Twisted Wreath is amazing: An ancient oak, once a hanging tree, now split by a bolt from the skies, bent by the weight of curses and sorrow, watched my Mother Illona, who crafts poppets and hangs them on the tree – cursing those that the poppets represent. This is amazing.

Heckler’s Hall is unique – part mobile circus, part jester’s academy and part rent-a-riot, this locale is led by the gnome Satu Tylik, and most assuredly makes for an interesting foil…or tool regarding the politicking going on in the city. There would also be a capable freight operation that is bound to have some gainful work for adventurers, and an out of city boarding house also makes sense: After all, the gates won’t be open all the time! Weary travelers can find the vandalized shrine of a barbaric god, tended by a lone caretaker, and just south of Languard, a stone shack is pierced by a mighty olive tree, where a rail-thin and pockmarked misanthrope sells herbs. The aptly-named Outside Inn is a traveler’s place that can be a great source of information when visiting Languard for the first time.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports solid b/w-artworks. The cartography is great, and the city backdrop supplement does have a player-friendly version. The pdf is fully bookmarked and comes in two versions – one optimized for screen-use and one that has been optimized for the printer.

This pdf is the work of a surprising amount of authors: Christopher Bunge, Sam Cameron-McKee, Kim Frandsen, Christopher Hunt, Aaron King, Ben Martin, Rebecca McLaren, Hilary Moon Murphy, Adam Ness, Treyson Sanders, Kris Vezner, John Whyte. It is surprising, then, to note how unified the content feels. The locations outside of the walls are intriguing and captivating, blending the rural and the more metropolitan. Personally, I think that the entries that directly reference in some way Languard’s dynamics are the strongest. Where a sense of realism is enforced by businesses or dubious characters, where refuse makes for a disgusting grove, where enigmatic mansions may present a shadowy puppeteer behind the scenes, this is where the pdf excels. It is surprising, considering how many of these authors are names I don’t regularly encounter among my reviews, how refined and intriguing these entries are. So, all awesome? Well…almost. A couple of locations are off the map, and some traveling distance from the city gates would have been nice, but, as a whole, this is indeed a very good supplement. As such, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: Beyond the Walls (SNE)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for the review, End. I'm delighted you are enjoying our look at Languard!
GM's Miscellany: The Thingonomicon (System Neutral)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/30/2018 09:34:11

You know all those little "environmental" things that dungeons are littered with that may not always be foremost in the minds of adventurers or dungeon masters? Things like "a cool mist that hugs the floor" or "this goblin has infected pustules covering his face." Little things that add something to a game session, or send a gamer's mind off in the direction of a new adventure? This book has those.

Yes, it's a compilation of previous work, but that work was awesome, so it's nice to have a collection. It's especially nice that a hard-cover option is available, because this is the sort of book that gets opened to various pages, and isn't read from cover-to-cover.

Things you'd see in the various environments, little random treasures you'd find, different traps, random (interesting) NPCs to encounter . . . this is a list that allows a GM to add little bits and pieces to his game.

Raging Swan excels at this type of product, and it's system-neutral, so it's not specific to a particular game. Geared towards the fantasy-genre, there's still plenty of information that could be used in a 20's Lovecraftian game, a modern game, or if stretched, a sci-fi setting. Example, "20 things to find in an abaondoned camp site" has lots of things that could be used for an abandoned moonshiner's shack. Naturally, the Necromancer's Sanctum is pretty obvious. The entries for a war-ravaged land can be modified to show the aftermath of a planetary invasion by Colonial Marines.

Again, this has lots of ideas, and add those little details that may be considered throw-away lines. Of course, players will grab onto these throw-away lines and head down the rabbit hole ("Why does this goblin have lesions on his face? What's the purpose of that lock of blonde hair we found in the chieftains' pocket? Why were there lumps of coal in this skeleton's eyes?"), but that's half the fun, isn't it?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
GM's Miscellany: The Thingonomicon (System Neutral)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Creator Reply:
Thank you for this review. I'm delighted you enjoyed the book!
Languard Locations: High City
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/29/2018 05:49:35

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Languard Locations series, which details the different districts of the city of Languard in more detail, clocks in at 14 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 8 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

We have taken a look at where the unfortunate dwell, so let’s move to the other side of the Svart that almost bisects the town, let us take a look at where Languard’s elite dwells – and as such, we begin with an overview of the noble families of Languard, supplement by a half-page b/w-artwork. This section is followed by an excerpt from Tommi Salama’s excellent map of the city, which notes the respective points of interest of this section of Languard.

The pdf contains no less than 10 locations, depicted in detail, following the formula established by the series. Beyond the description of the respective locations, NPCs encountered are noted (with race and class suggestions in brackets) in a fluff-centric manner, and the locations all come with their own adventure hooks, should PCs wandering into them not suffice for you to jumpstart your adventuring impulses. It should be noted that all these locations are new.

All right, but what sights are there to be seen in the High City of Languard? Well, there would an immaculately pristine jeweler’s shop for the upper class – though, if you do dig a bit deeper, there will be plenty of adventuring possible here. As the center of commerce in the Duchy of Ashlar, it shouldn’t come as a surprise, that there indeed is a proper bank to be found here – which, if you’ve e.g. played the classic entries of the once-great Thief: The Dark Project franchise, should immediately get your creative juices flowing. Yes, it has underground vaults. Of course, it would be unseeming to bring animals to certain locations, and a proper member of the well-to-do will want a steed representative of the proper status. Well, a prized horse from Miya’s stables would be the Languardian equivalent of a proper sports car – and yes, stabling costs are noted and account for more exotic companions.

Utterly hilarious would be a fine bakery for the distinguished, which would be a prime target for assassination attempts, were it not for the fact that those that know how to ask can actually gain the attention of special employees. Excess breeds demand and decadence, and as far as culinary delights are concerned, you probably can’t do better than the Dragonheart tavern in Languard. Here, bulette flank, cockatrice eggs and the like may be ordered – which, obviously, results in a rather major demand for adventurers willing to risk life and limb to acquire these exotic oddities for the distinguished gourmands among the city’s populace.

A local favorite, part baker, part alchemist and weird, with alembics and cauldrons, Old Mother Grumm’s sells everything from fruitcake to elixirs of love, all made by the matronly and kind-hearted old lady-wizard the shop’s named for. This place btw. also notes proper magic items for sale. And yes, if you are looking for a fine yarn and have the coin to spare, then you’ll find a place that caters to these demands in the High City as well: Needle’s Poise provides just that – supplemented by a proper b/w-artwork, btw. Easily one of the most outré places in the whole city, the “Emerald Medusa” is a multi-decked sailing ship turned festhall/eatery. The intricately-carved medusa emits beams of colored light from its lenses, and it is here that decadent nobles come to politick, weave intrigues or impress adventurers. And yes, there is a means to actually make the obvious disco-angle narratively-relevant. Kudos!! Pharran’s Shroud, then, would obviously cater to another sort of vice: Run by a silk-shrouded lady of unknown origins, this place would be Languard’s high-class brothel – and in an interesting twist, said shrouded mistress is actually not an entity with a petrifying or similarly devastating gaze attack, but something more rewarding to unearth…

The Ruby Plate would be another culinary establishment, but one that focuses on showmanship, a place where experimental foods may be ordered. What about an assassin berry vine, for example? I know I’d try that…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no serious glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports quite a lot of rather nice b/w-artworks. The excerpt from the map is neat, and since the city supplement itself featured the key-less player-friendly version, none is required here. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, and the pdf comes in two different versions, one optimized for screen use, and one for the printer.

Languard’s High City, to me, felt, in an interesting twist, distinctly American in its focus on consumption. “Are you still hungry?”, the question for ambition, for success, uses an obvious simile with consumption, and indeed, consumption, if anything, is the leitmotif of this district, which should make for a rather sharp contrast in comparison to the poorer regions of the city. The map, with its broader streets and less cramped environments, also emphasizes this – but perhaps that’s just me. I’m still flabbergasted and blown away by the vastness of the US – both in landscape, and in the sheer availability of pretty much anything the heart could desire. But this could just be my own interpretation of the pdf penned by Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez, Steve Hood, Amber Underwood and Mike Welham.

And, to make that clear, I do think that this fits in PERFECTLY within the context of Languard. The High City is unique and has its own flair, one that manages to be both part of Languard and distinct from its other components. The city, as a whole, is enriched by the thematically-stringent focus on the Leitmotif – and in a world where magics exist, the presence of a place like the Emerald Medusa, easily my favorite place alongside Grumm’s, makes sense on so many levels, and also allows you to inject a bit of the weird into the grime and grit of the poorer regions. It generates a contrast that highlights the global motifs of Languard even better. It works because it is this weird place in an otherwise rather grounded area, and because it is rather realistic in how it presents its weirdness. I love it. In short, the High City of Languard is a great place to dive into some serious intrigue, to rub shoulders with the rich and powerful, and to shake your head at the decadence of the aristocracy. A great and unique region, this retains the exceedingly high standard of the series. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: High City
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Creator Reply:
I'm delighted you are enjoying Languard so much, Thilo. Thank you for the review!
Languard Locations: High City (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/29/2018 05:48:42

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Languard Locations series, which details the different districts of the city of Languard in more detail, clocks in at 14 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 8 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

We have taken a look at where the unfortunate dwell, so let’s move to the other side of the Svart that almost bisects the town, let us take a look at where Languard’s elite dwells – and as such, we begin with an overview of the noble families of Languard, supplement by a half-page b/w-artwork. This section is followed by an excerpt from Tommi Salama’s excellent map of the city, which notes the respective points of interest of this section of Languard.

The pdf contains no less than 10 locations, depicted in detail, following the formula established by the series. Beyond the description of the respective locations, NPCs encountered are noted (in 5e, these mostly point towards the default NPC statblocks) in a fluff-centric manner, and the locations all come with their own adventure hooks, should PCs wandering into them not suffice for you to jumpstart your adventuring impulses.

All right, but what sights are there to be seen in the High City of Languard? Well, there would an immaculately pristine jeweler’s shop for the upper class – though, if you do dig a bit deeper, there will be plenty of adventuring possible here. As the center of commerce in the Duchy of Ashlar, it shouldn’t come as a surprise, that there indeed is a proper bank to be found here – which, if you’ve e.g. played the classic entries of the once-great Thief: The Dark Project franchise, should immediately get your creative juices flowing. Yes, it has underground vaults. Of course, it would be unseeming to bring animals to certain locations, and a proper member of the well-to-do will want a steed representative of the proper status. Well, a prized horse from Miya’s stables would be the Languardian equivalent of a proper sports car – and yes, stabling costs are noted and account for more exotic companions.

Utterly hilarious would be a fine bakery for the distinguished, which would be a prime target for assassination attempts, were it not for the fact that those that know how to ask can actually gain the attention of special employees. Excess breeds demand and decadence, and as far as culinary delights are concerned, you probably can’t do better than the Dragonheart tavern in Languard. Here, bulette flank, cockatrice eggs and the like may be ordered – which, obviously, results in a rather major demand for adventurers willing to risk life and limb to acquire these exotic oddities for the distinguished gourmands among the city’s populace.

A local favorite, part baker, part alchemist and weird, with alembics and cauldrons, Old Mother Grumm’s sells everything from fruitcake to elixirs of love, all made by the matronly and kind-hearted old lady-wizard the shop’s named for. This place btw. also notes proper magic items for sale, which have been properly adjusted for 5e, though, alas, the flavor text here hasn’t properly adjusted the names of the potions it refers to.

And yes, if you are looking for a fine yarn and have the coin to spare, then you’ll find a place that caters to these demands in the High City as well: Needle’s Poise provides just that – supplemented by a proper b/w-artwork, btw. Easily one of the most outré places in the whole city, the “Emerald Medusa” is a multi-decked sailing ship turned festhall/eatery. The intricately-carved medusa emits beams of colored light from its lenses, and it is here that decadent nobles come to politick, weave intrigues or impress adventurers. And yes, there is a means to actually make the obvious disco-angle narratively-relevant. Kudos!! Pharran’s Shroud, then, would obviously cater to another sort of vice: Run by a silk-shrouded lady of unknown origins, this place would be Languard’s high-class brothel – and in an interesting twist, said shrouded mistress is actually not an entity with a petrifying or similarly devastating gaze attack, but something more rewarding to unearth…

The Ruby Plate would be another culinary establishment, but one that focuses on showmanship, a place where experimental foods may be ordered. What about an assassin berry vine, for example? I know I’d try that…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no serious glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports quite a lot of rather nice b/w-artworks. The excerpt from the map is neat, and since the city supplement itself featured the key-less player-friendly version, none is required here. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, and the pdf comes in two different versions, one optimized for screen use, and one for the printer.

Languard’s High City, to me, felt, in an interesting twist, distinctly American in its focus on consumption. “Are you still hungry?”, the question for ambition, for success, uses an obvious simile with consumption, and indeed, consumption, if anything, is the leitmotif of this district, which should make for a rather sharp contrast in comparison to the poorer regions of the city. The map, with its broader streets and less cramped environments, also emphasizes this – but perhaps that’s just me. I’m still flabbergasted and blown away by the vastness of the US – both in landscape, and in the sheer availability of pretty much anything the heart could desire. But this could just be my own interpretation of the pdf penned by Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez, Steve Hood, Amber Underwood and Mike Welham.

And, to make that clear, I do think that this fits in PERFECTLY within the context of Languard. The High City is unique and has its own flair, one that manages to be both part of Languard and distinct from its other components. The city, as a whole, is enriched by the thematically-stringent focus on the Leitmotif – and in a world where magics exist, the presence of a place like the Emerald Medusa, easily my favorite place alongside Grumm’s, makes sense on so many levels, and also allows you to inject a bit of the weird into the grime and grit of the poorer regions. It generates a contrast that highlights the global motifs of Languard even better. It works because it is this weird place in an otherwise rather grounded area, and because it is rather realistic in how it presents its weirdness. I love it. In short, the High City of Languard is a great place to dive into some serious intrigue, to rub shoulders with the rich and powerful, and to shake your head at the decadence of the aristocracy. A great and unique region, this retains the exceedingly high standard of the series. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars, only omitting my seal of approval for the 5e-version due to the missed references in the flavor-text mentioned above.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: High City (5e)
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Creator Reply:
I'm delighted you are enjoying Languard so much, Thilo. Thank you for the review! I'll look to fix that missed references with the next release
Languard Locations: High City (SNE)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/29/2018 05:46:41

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Languard Locations series, which details the different districts of the city of Languard in more detail, clocks in at 14 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 8 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

We have taken a look at where the unfortunate dwell, so let’s move to the other side of the Svart that almost bisects the town, let us take a look at where Languard’s elite dwells – and as such, we begin with an overview of the noble families of Languard, supplement by a half-page b/w-artwork. This section is followed by an excerpt from Tommi Salama’s excellent map of the city, which notes the respective points of interest of this section of Languard.

The pdf contains no less than 10 locations, depicted in detail, following the formula established by the series. Beyond the description of the respective locations, NPCs encountered are noted (with race and/or class suggestions, properly adjusted to represent old-school classes) in a fluff-centric manner, and the locations all come with their own adventure hooks, should PCs wandering into them not suffice for you to jumpstart your adventuring impulses. It should be noted that all these locations are new.

All right, but what sights are there to be seen in the High City of Languard? Well, there would an immaculately pristine jeweler’s shop for the upper class – though, if you do dig a bit deeper, there will be plenty of adventuring possible here. As the center of commerce in the Duchy of Ashlar, it shouldn’t come as a surprise, that there indeed is a proper bank to be found here – which, if you’ve e.g. played the classic entries of the once-great Thief: The Dark Project franchise, should immediately get your creative juices flowing. Yes, it has underground vaults. Of course, it would be unseeming to bring animals to certain locations, and a proper member of the well-to-do will want a steed representative of the proper status. Well, a prized horse from Miya’s stables would be the Languardian equivalent of a proper sports car – and yes, stabling costs are noted and account for more exotic companions.

Utterly hilarious would be a fine bakery for the distinguished, which would be a prime target for assassination attempts, were it not for the fact that those that know how to ask can actually gain the attention of special employees. Excess breeds demand and decadence, and as far as culinary delights are concerned, you probably can’t do better than the Dragonheart tavern in Languard. Here, bulette flank, cockatrice eggs and the like may be ordered – which, obviously, results in a rather major demand for adventurers willing to risk life and limb to acquire these exotic oddities for the distinguished gourmands among the city’s populace.

A local favorite, part baker, part alchemist and weird, with alembics and cauldrons, Old Mother Grumm’s sells everything from fruitcake to philtres of love, all made by the matronly and kind-hearted old lady-wizard the shop’s named for. As you can glean from the above, the items have been properly renamed to refer to classic, old-school items – but, alas, this renaming has not been consistently applied: There are references to the PFRPG items remaining in the flavor-text.

This place btw. also notes proper magic items for sale. And yes, if you are looking for a fine yarn and have the coin to spare, then you’ll find a place that caters to these demands in the High City as well: Needle’s Poise provides just that – supplemented by a proper b/w-artwork, btw. Easily one of the most outré places in the whole city, the “Emerald Medusa” is a multi-decked sailing ship turned festhall/eatery. The intricately-carved medusa emits beams of colored light from its lenses, and it is here that decadent nobles come to politick, weave intrigues or impress adventurers. And yes, there is a means to actually make the obvious disco-angle narratively-relevant. Kudos!! Pharran’s Shroud, then, would obviously cater to another sort of vice: Run by a silk-shrouded lady of unknown origins, this place would be Languard’s high-class brothel – and in an interesting twist, said shrouded mistress is actually not an entity with a petrifying or similarly devastating gaze attack, but something more rewarding to unearth…

The Ruby Plate would be another culinary establishment, but one that focuses on showmanship, a place where experimental foods may be ordered. What about an assassin berry vine, for example? I know I’d try that…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no serious glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports quite a lot of rather nice b/w-artworks. The excerpt from the map is neat, and since the city supplement itself featured the key-less player-friendly version, none is required here. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, and the pdf comes in two different versions, one optimized for screen use, and one for the printer.

Languard’s High City, to me, felt, in an interesting twist, distinctly American in its focus on consumption. “Are you still hungry?”, the question for ambition, for success, uses an obvious simile with consumption, and indeed, consumption, if anything, is the leitmotif of this district, which should make for a rather sharp contrast in comparison to the poorer regions of the city. The map, with its broader streets and less cramped environments, also emphasizes this – but perhaps that’s just me. I’m still flabbergasted and blown away by the vastness of the US – both in landscape, and in the sheer availability of pretty much anything the heart could desire. But this could just be my own interpretation of the pdf penned by Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez, Steve Hood, Amber Underwood and Mike Welham.

And, to make that clear, I do think that this fits in PERFECTLY within the context of Languard. The High City is unique and has its own flair, one that manages to be both part of Languard and distinct from its other components. The city, as a whole, is enriched by the thematically-stringent focus on the Leitmotif – and in a world where magics exist, the presence of a place like the Emerald Medusa, easily my favorite place alongside Grumm’s, makes sense on so many levels, and also allows you to inject a bit of the weird into the grime and grit of the poorer regions. It generates a contrast that highlights the global motifs of Languard even better. It works because it is this weird place in an otherwise rather grounded area, and because it is rather realistic in how it presents its weirdness. I love it. In short, the High City of Languard is a great place to dive into some serious intrigue, to rub shoulders with the rich and powerful, and to shake your head at the decadence of the aristocracy. A great and unique region, this retains the exceedingly high standard of the series. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars, omitting my seal of approval only due to the aforementioned remnant references.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: High City (SNE)
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Creator Reply:
I'm delighted you are enjoying Languard so much, Thilo. Thank you for the review! I'll fix those miss-references on the next "printing"
Languard Locations: The Shambles
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/28/2018 08:54:01

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The second installment of the more in-depth look at specific neighborhoods and regions of the city of Languard clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Claustrophobically huddled within the southern part of the city, the region known as “The Shambles” lies close to the Svart, between Cheap Street and Low Gate, an area of narrow, twisting alleyways, tottering buildings and desperation. Here, the city’s poor huddle together in unsanitary, shoddily cobbled-together wooden constructions, with upper levels jutting over alleys, dimming what little sun makes its way down below. 3, sometimes 4 stories high, these structures rise, creating a general atmosphere of a labyrinth, a maze, a hive.

A total of 8 different, new locations are depicted in lavish detail within – as before, each of these places notes the respective people in the locale, depicted in brief, fluff-centric write-ups (usually 2 per locale), and additionally, each of these receives 2 or more adventure hooks to jumpstart adventuring. If there is gold to be spent at one location, it’ll state as much, noting e.g. the buy-in for arm wrestling and prices for drink, and one location even has some minor magic to be purchased.

That would be Kardagg’s discount emporium, where failed adventurers come to sell off their remaining gear. You know, this is really appealing to me. Adventurers are bound to fail often – all those dead guys and gals in dungeons throughout the world speak of this; ditto for “retired” barkeep adventurers. But what about the survivors who realize that gold and glory may not be as glorious, perhaps not worth the trauma adventuring can invariably bring? It’s a small thing, but I very much enjoyed this place.

Veera is similarly pragmatic: Her shop is called “Corpsewear” and certainly makes no excuses or pretenses where her clothes come from. And indeed, I do enjoy this as well – there is a lot of roleplaying potential here, from old legacies to items associated with haunts and the living dead. If you’re more in the mood for aforementioned arm wrestling, then you may want to take a look at “The Broken Elbow”, a rough and tumble tavern known for cheap beer and cheaper women. Not everyone is gracious in defeat, though – and someone may know about Gloamhold…but will only part with information if beaten in arm-wrestling. A small mini-game for arm wrestling would have been nice to see here.

At the intersection of Cheap Street and Cross Street, the crier’s corner sees heavy traffic, with doomsayer Kuura spreading proclamations of doom. A once reputable sage has been affected with a strange ailment that manifests as faint trembles and even mild hallucinations, but what is plaguing the poor fellow? Oh, and if you’re nice to the poor here, they may well warn you of Mongrel Alley – the darkened street, barely touched by the rays of the sun, is home to wild creatures…and, as they say, an unnerving vagrant wrapped in dirty rags. A scrupulous pawnbroker may make for a valuable asset for certain PCs, a foil to others, while “The Stone Cauldron” is never truly emptied of cider, its dubious brew bubbling constantly.

Crows and ravens perch atop a crumbling stone building, with branches of nearby trees hanging overhead; this is the Rookery, where a druid with a penchant and preference for corvids offers a unique service. Finally, there is the well of dreams, where some wishes may well be granted – though in a potentially grisly manner.

It should be noted that we do get a detailed, enlarged map of the region of the city that is “The Shambles”, but no key-less iteration of this enlarged section. That being said, since the city backdrop already offered that, it’s easy enough for players to fill that one out.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re top-notch, I noticed no serious hiccups. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant two-column b/w-standard and the pdf has solid, small b/w-artworks and an excerpt of the great map. The pdf comes fully bookmarked, and in two versions – one for screen use, and one intended to be printed out. Kudos!

It is puzzling to see how many people worked on this: the Shambles are penned by Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez, Steve Hood, Amber Underwood and Mike Welham – and it is testament to the prowess and skill of al of these authors that this supplement feels, this multitude none withstanding, like a concise and unified whole. Despite of the nature of the Shambles and the intentionally evoked, cobbled together, ramshackle sense the district creates, the entirety still gels together as an organic neighborhood – not only within its own framework, but also within the context of Languard as a whole. In short, this is one amazing little supplement, and well worth a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: The Shambles
Click to show product description

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Languard Locations: The Shambles (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/28/2018 08:51:14

An Endzietgeist.com review

The second installment of the more in-depth look at specific neighborhoods and regions of the city of Languard clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Claustrophobically huddled within the southern part of the city, the region known as “The Shambles” lies close to the Svart, between Cheap Street and Low Gate, an area of narrow, twisting alleyways, tottering buildings and desperation. Here, the city’s poor huddle together in unsanitary, shoddily cobbled-together wooden constructions, with upper levels jutting over alleys, dimming what little sun makes its way down below. 3, sometimes 4 stories high, these structures rise, creating a general atmosphere of a labyrinth, a maze, a hive.

A total of 8 different, new locations are depicted in lavish detail within – as before, each of these places notes the respective people in the locale, depicted in brief, fluff-centric write-ups (usually 2 per locale), and additionally, each of these receives 2 or more adventure hooks to jumpstart adventuring. If there is gold to be spent at one location, it’ll state as much, noting e.g. the buy-in for arm wrestling and prices for drink, and one location even has some minor magic to be purchased. The references towards NPCs and the aforementioned magic items for sale have been properly adjusted to represent 5e’s dynamics.

That would be Kardagg’s discount emporium, where failed adventurers come to sell off their remaining gear. You know, this is really appealing to me. Adventurers are bound to fail often – all those dead guys and gals in dungeons throughout the world speak of this; ditto for “retired” barkeep adventurers. But what about the survivors who realize that gold and glory may not be as glorious, perhaps not worth the trauma adventuring can invariably bring? It’s a small thing, but I very much enjoyed this place.

Veera is similarly pragmatic: Her shop is called “Corpsewear” and certainly makes no excuses or pretenses where her clothes come from. And indeed, I do enjoy this as well – there is a lot of roleplaying potential here, from old legacies to items associated with haunts and the living dead. If you’re more in the mood for aforementioned arm wrestling, then you may want to take a look at “The Broken Elbow”, a rough and tumble tavern known for cheap beer and cheaper women. Not everyone is gracious in defeat, though – and someone may know about Gloamhold…but will only part with information if beaten in arm-wrestling. A small mini-game for arm wrestling would have been nice to see here.

At the intersection of Cheap Street and Cross Street, the crier’s corner sees heavy traffic, with doomsayer Kuura spreading proclamations of doom. A once reputable sage has been affected with a strange ailment that manifests as faint trembles and even mild hallucinations, but what is plaguing the poor fellow? Oh, and if you’re nice to the poor here, they may well warn you of Mongrel Alley – the darkened street, barely touched by the rays of the sun, is home to wild creatures…and, as they say, an unnerving vagrant wrapped in dirty rags. A scrupulous pawnbroker may make for a valuable asset for certain PCs, a foil to others, while “The Stone Cauldron” is never truly emptied of cider, its dubious brew bubbling constantly.

Crows and ravens perch atop a crumbling stone building, with branches of nearby trees hanging overhead; this is the Rookery, where a druid with a penchant and preference for corvids offers a unique service. Finally, there is the well of dreams, where some wishes may well be granted – though in a potentially grisly manner.

It should be noted that we do get a detailed, enlarged map of the region of the city that is “The Shambles”, but no key-less iteration of this enlarged section. That being said, since the city backdrop already offered that, it’s easy enough for players to fill that one out.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re top-notch, I noticed no serious hiccups. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant two-column b/w-standard and the pdf has solid, small b/w-artworks and an excerpt of the great map. The pdf comes fully bookmarked, and in two versions – one for screen use, and one intended to be printed out. Kudos!

It is puzzling to see how many people worked on this: the Shambles are penned by Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez, Steve Hood, Amber Underwood and Mike Welham – and it is testament to the prowess and skill of al of these authors that this supplement feels, this multitude none withstanding, like a concise and unified whole. Despite of the nature of the Shambles and the intentionally evoked, cobbled together, ramshackle sense the district creates, the entirety still gels together as an organic neighborhood – not only within its own framework, but also within the context of Languard as a whole. In short, this is one amazing little supplement that works just as well in 5e, and well worth a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: The Shambles (5e)
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Languard Locations: The Shambles (SNE)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/28/2018 08:48:49

An Endzietgeist.com review

The second installment of the more in-depth look at specific neighborhoods and regions of the city of Languard clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Claustrophobically huddled within the southern part of the city, the region known as “The Shambles” lies close to the Svart, between Cheap Street and Low Gate, an area of narrow, twisting alleyways, tottering buildings and desperation. Here, the city’s poor huddle together in unsanitary, shoddily cobbled-together wooden constructions, with upper levels jutting over alleys, dimming what little sun makes its way down below. 3, sometimes 4 stories high, these structures rise, creating a general atmosphere of a labyrinth, a maze, a hive.

A total of 8 different, new locations are depicted in lavish detail within – as before, each of these places notes the respective people in the locale, depicted in brief, fluff-centric write-ups (usually 2 per locale), and additionally, each of these receives 2 or more adventure hooks to jumpstart adventuring. If there is gold to be spent at one location, it’ll state as much, noting e.g. the buy-in for arm wrestling and prices for drink, and one location even has some minor magic to be purchased – these items, just as the references of NPCs, have been correctly adjusted to old school standards. Magic users and thieves abound.

That would be Kardagg’s discount emporium, where failed adventurers come to sell off their remaining gear. You know, this is really appealing to me. Adventurers are bound to fail often – all those dead guys and gals in dungeons throughout the world speak of this; ditto for “retired” barkeep adventurers. But what about the survivors who realize that gold and glory may not be as glorious, perhaps not worth the trauma adventuring can invariably bring? It’s a small thing, but I very much enjoyed this place.

Veera is similarly pragmatic: Her shop is called “Corpsewear” and certainly makes no excuses or pretenses where her clothes come from. And indeed, I do enjoy this as well – there is a lot of roleplaying potential here, from old legacies to items associated with haunts and the living dead. If you’re more in the mood for aforementioned arm wrestling, then you may want to take a look at “The Broken Elbow”, a rough and tumble tavern known for cheap beer and cheaper women. Not everyone is gracious in defeat, though – and someone may know about Gloamhold…but will only part with information if beaten in arm-wrestling. A small mini-game for arm wrestling would have been nice to see here.

At the intersection of Cheap Street and Cross Street, the crier’s corner sees heavy traffic, with doomsayer Kuura spreading proclamations of doom. A once reputable sage has been affected with a strange ailment that manifests as faint trembles and even mild hallucinations, but what is plaguing the poor fellow? Oh, and if you’re nice to the poor here, they may well warn you of Mongrel Alley – the darkened street, barely touched by the rays of the sun, is home to wild creatures…and, as they say, an unnerving vagrant wrapped in dirty rags. A scrupulous pawnbroker may make for a valuable asset for certain PCs, a foil to others, while “The Stone Cauldron” is never truly emptied of cider, its dubious brew bubbling constantly.

Crows and ravens perch atop a crumbling stone building, with branches of nearby trees hanging overhead; this is the Rookery, where a druid with a penchant and preference for corvids offers a unique service. Finally, there is the well of dreams, where some wishes may well be granted – though in a potentially grisly manner.

It should be noted that we do get a detailed, enlarged map of the region of the city that is “The Shambles”, but no key-less iteration of this enlarged section. That being said, since the city backdrop already offered that, it’s easy enough for players to fill that one out.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re top-notch, I noticed no serious hiccups. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant two-column b/w-standard and the pdf has solid, small b/w-artworks and an excerpt of the great map. The pdf comes fully bookmarked, and in two versions – one for screen use, and one intended to be printed out. Kudos!

It is puzzling to see how many people worked on this: the Shambles are penned by Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez, Steve Hood, Amber Underwood and Mike Welham – and it is testament to the prowess and skill of al of these authors that this supplement feels, this multitude none withstanding, like a concise and unified whole. Despite of the nature of the Shambles and the intentionally evoked, cobbled together, ramshackle sense the district creates, the entirety still gels together as an organic neighborhood – not only within its own framework, but also within the context of Languard as a whole. In short, this is one amazing little supplement that loses nothing of its appeal in the old-school version, and well worth a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: The Shambles (SNE)
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Languard Locations: Low City
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/26/2018 04:17:01

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The first installment of the Languard Locations series, which depicts the respective districts of the aforementioned city in more detail, clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

The low city if the part closest to the city’s wall, situated South of the Svart, and it is also home to the slum-like shambles and fishshambles, though these districts have their own supplements devoted to them – we’ll return to them in time, in the reviews that cover these quarters.

Anyways, on the very first page, we do receive a version of the city map, an excerpt, that highlights the regions that actually belong to the low city, and here, we also get points of interest duly noted. 12 locations are provided, and, as you could probably glean from the moniker and adjacent quarters, this is not exactly a high-class environment. (Though, as Languard adheres very much to a medieval, gritty Greyhawk-ish aesthetic, city folks still are better off than peasants…)

If you wander these streets, you can find frustrated social climbing jewelers, plagued by repeated break-ins and justifiably paranoid as a result. This would be as well a place as any to note that each every location within this supplement lists its key NPCs in fluff-only descriptions that manage to paint vivid pictures, and the respective locales also featured adventure hooks if gumption and peculiarities of these should not suffice to kick your players into adventuring mode.

The interesting thing about these locales, though, would be their diversity: In the second basement of a nameless tenement, a surprisingly vast, hidden tavern, the Mixing Pot, is hidden, serving as meeting place where both aristocrats and street urchins, the rich and the poor, rub shoulders while enjoying fine brews – and the eel and eggs sound like a dish I’d definitely be willing to try, considering my love for unagi…

Going one step further, the pdf also presents the “Orc’s Head” tavern – a place that sports a carved limestone orc’s head atop the entrance, and one that most assuredly should also work as a great place for adventurers to carouse away their hard-earned gold. More importantly, it’s also a place where the FREE mini-game “The Dragon and the Thief” may be played, and the rules are explained, in case you don’t want to download the free pdf. Finally, and that may be the most important thing here: The tavern (2 floors, cellar PLUS outbuilding!) are fully mapped by none other than Tommi Salama – and the map is player-friendly, making for one amazing handout!

If you know where to look, you may well find a smuggler and fence, and in an aspect all too often sanitized away, the pdf does note that there is actually a dealer in manure here, a refuse collector. And yes, this is relevant for adventuring purposes…. Marja’s House of Sighs, aka the “Moaning Halls” caters to other, worldly desires…and the madam may actually have some use for the PCs…or make a fine antagonist. Sometimes, location trumps skill – all too often, actually. The same may hold true for a healing establishment found within, which does provide brief descriptions of the respective rooms. Yes, there is a waiting room. If you’re more in the mood for a macabre round of drinking, you may want to check out “The Last Sigh” – in view of the cadavers dangling from traitor’s gate…coincidentally also a great place to check out what bounties are currently available…

Often neglected, the living situation actually also is covered here, and the Esoteric Fellowship’s White Tower should be a good reason for magically-inclined PCs to visit this place…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re top-notch, I noticed no issues on a formal or rules-language level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the book sports amazing b/w-cartography, as noted before. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, and it also is provided in two versions: One optimized for screen-use, one for the printer.

Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez and Amber Underwood provide the level of detail and finesse that elevates Languard’s already impressive City Backdrop file even further. The detailed descriptions of the low city’s surprisingly diverse (and adventuring-relevant) locations breathe a life into these streets that make it very easy to visualize this – with some time, your PCs will be able to say “Oh, and then we ran down the street across the white tower, towards…” – it’s that…in lack of a better word, “tangible.” Languard’s low city feels organic, plausible and diverse, the characters mentioned are interesting, and there is a ton of potential adventuring to be had here. What more could you ask for? An excellent supplement and furious start for the product line, this deserves 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: Low City
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I'm delighted you've enjoyed the start of this series so much, old chum! I'm running my own campaign in Languard at the moment and am having a blast!
Languard Locations: Low City (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/26/2018 04:16:01

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The first installment of the Languard Locations series, which depicts the respective districts of the aforementioned city in more detail, clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

The low city if the part closest to the city’s wall, situated South of the Svart, and it is also home to the slum-like shambles and fishshambles, though these districts have their own supplements devoted to them – we’ll return to them in time, in the reviews that cover these quarters.

The Patfinder version has pretty much been almost system neutral anyways, but it should be noted that, for the nitpicky, this version has properly replaced references to classes and levels, where applicable, with the proper pointers towards 5e’s default NPC-array.

Anyways, on the very first page, we do receive a version of the city map, an excerpt, that highlights the regions that actually belong to the low city, and here, we also get points of interest duly noted. 12 locations are provided, and, as you could probably glean from the moniker and adjacent quarters, this is not exactly a high-class environment. (Though, as Languard adheres very much to a medieval, gritty Greyhawk-ish aesthetic, city folks still are better off than peasants…)

If you wander these streets, you can find frustrated social climbing jewelers, plagued by repeated break-ins and justifiably paranoid as a result. This would be as well a place as any to note that each every location within this supplement lists its key NPCs in fluff-only descriptions that manage to paint vivid pictures, and the respective locales also featured adventure hooks if gumption and peculiarities of these should not suffice to kick your players into adventuring mode.

The interesting thing about these locales, though, would be their diversity: In the second basement of a nameless tenement, a surprisingly vast, hidden tavern, the Mixing Pot, is hidden, serving as meeting place where both aristocrats and street urchins, the rich and the poor, rub shoulders while enjoying fine brews – and the eel and eggs sound like a dish I’d definitely be willing to try, considering my love for unagi…

Going one step further, the pdf also presents the “Orc’s Head” tavern – a place that sports a carved limestone orc’s head atop the entrance, and one that most assuredly should also work as a great place for adventurers to carouse away their hard-earned gold. More importantly, it’s also a place where the FREE mini-game “The Dragon and the Thief” may be played, and the rules are explained, in case you don’t want to download the free pdf. Finally, and that may be the most important thing here: The tavern (2 floors, cellar PLUS outbuilding!) are fully mapped by none other than Tommi Salama – and the map is player-friendly, making for one amazing handout!

If you know where to look, you may well find a smuggler and fence, and in an aspect all too often sanitized away, the pdf does note that there is actually a dealer in manure here, a refuse collector. And yes, this is relevant for adventuring purposes…. Marja’s House of Sighs, aka the “Moaning Halls” caters to other, worldly desires…and the madam may actually have some use for the PCs…or make a fine antagonist. Sometimes, location trumps skill – all too often, actually. The same may hold true for a healing establishment found within, which does provide brief descriptions of the respective rooms. Yes, there is a waiting room. If you’re more in the mood for a macabre round of drinking, you may want to check out “The Last Sigh” – in view of the cadavers dangling from traitor’s gate…coincidentally also a great place to check out what bounties are currently available…

Often neglected, the living situation actually also is covered here, and the Esoteric Fellowship’s White Tower should be a good reason for magically-inclined PCs to visit this place…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re top-notch, I noticed no issues on a formal or rules-language level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the book sports amazing b/w-cartography, as noted before. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, and it also is provided in two versions: One optimized for screen-use, one for the printer.

Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez and Amber Underwood provide the level of detail and finesse that elevates Languard’s already impressive City Backdrop file even further. The detailed descriptions of the low city’s surprisingly diverse (and adventuring-relevant) locations breathe a life into these streets that make it very easy to visualize this – with some time, your PCs will be able to say “Oh, and then we ran down the street across the white tower, towards…” – it’s that…in lack of a better word, “tangible.” Languard’s low city feels organic, plausible and diverse, the characters mentioned are interesting, and there is a ton of potential adventuring to be had here. What more could you ask for? The 5e version has been changed subtly to represent the proper statblock references.

An excellent supplement and furious start for the product line, this deserves 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: Low City (5e)
Click to show product description

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Creator Reply:
I'm delighted you've enjoyed the start of this series so much, old chum! I'm running my own campaign in Languard at the moment and am having a blast!
Languard Locations: Low City (SNE)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/26/2018 04:14:36

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The first installment of the Languard Locations series, which depicts the respective districts of the aforementioned city in more detail, clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

The low city if the part closest to the city’s wall, situated South of the Svart, and it is also home to the slum-like shambles and fishshambles, though these districts have their own supplements devoted to them – we’ll return to them in time, in the reviews that cover these quarters.

The Patfinder version has pretty much been almost system neutral anyways, but it should be noted that, for the nitpicky, this version has properly replaced new class names with their old-school equivalents – you won’t find the class designations of rogues or wizards within, instead making use of thiefs and magic-users. It’s a small touch, but I know from experience that some of my readers care about this.

Anyways, on the very first page, we do receive a version of the city map, an excerpt, that highlights the regions that actually belong to the low city, and here, we also get points of interest duly noted. 12 locations are provided, and, as you could probably glean from the moniker and adjacent quarters, this is not exactly a high-class environment. (Though, as Languard adheres very much to a medieval, gritty Greyhawk-ish aesthetic, city folks still are better off than peasants…)

If you wander these streets, you can find frustrated social climbing jewelers, plagued by repeated break-ins and justifiably paranoid as a result. This would be as well a place as any to note that each every location within this supplement lists its key NPCs in fluff-only descriptions that manage to paint vivid pictures, and the respective locales also featured adventure hooks if gumption and peculiarities of these should not suffice to kick your players into adventuring mode.

The interesting thing about these locales, though, would be their diversity: In the second basement of a nameless tenement, a surprisingly vast, hidden tavern, the Mixing Pot, is hidden, serving as meeting place where both aristocrats and street urchins, the rich and the poor, rub shoulders while enjoying fine brews – and the eel and eggs sound like a dish I’d definitely be willing to try, considering my love for unagi…

Going one step further, the pdf also presents the “Orc’s Head” tavern – a place that sports a carved limestone orc’s head atop the entrance, and one that most assuredly should also work as a great place for adventurers to carouse away their hard-earned gold. More importantly, it’s also a place where the FREE mini-game “The Dragon and the Thief” may be played, and the rules are explained, in case you don’t want to download the free pdf. Finally, and that may be the most important thing here: The tavern (2 floors, cellar PLUS outbuilding!) are fully mapped by none other than Tommi Salama – and the map is player-friendly, making for one amazing handout!

If you know where to look, you may well find a smuggler and fence, and in an aspect all too often sanitized away, the pdf does note that there is actually a dealer in manure here, a refuse collector. And yes, this is relevant for adventuring purposes…. Marja’s House of Sighs, aka the “Moaning Halls” caters to other, worldly desires…and the madam may actually have some use for the PCs…or make a fine antagonist. Sometimes, location trumps skill – all too often, actually. The same may hold true for a healing establishment found within, which does provide brief descriptions of the respective rooms. Yes, there is a waiting room. If you’re more in the mood for a macabre round of drinking, you may want to check out “The Last Sigh” – in view of the cadavers dangling from traitor’s gate…coincidentally also a great place to check out what bounties are currently available…

Often neglected, the living situation actually also is covered here, and the Esoteric Fellowship’s White Tower should be a good reason for magically-inclined PCs to visit this place…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re top-notch, I noticed no issues on a formal or rules-language level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the book sports amazing b/w-cartography, as noted before. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, and it also is provided in two versions: One optimized for screen-use, one for the printer.

Creighton Broadhurst, Jeff Gomez and Amber Underwood provide the level of detail and finesse that elevates Languard’s already impressive City Backdrop file even further. The detailed descriptions of the low city’s surprisingly diverse (and adventuring-relevant) locations breathe a life into these streets that make it very easy to visualize this – with some time, your PCs will be able to say “Oh, and then we ran down the street across the white tower, towards…” – it’s that…in lack of a better word, “tangible.” Languard’s low city feels organic, plausible and diverse, the characters mentioned are interesting, and there is a ton of potential adventuring to be had here. What more could you ask for? The system neutral version has been changed subtly to represent the old-school nomenclature, so no complaints there.

An excellent supplement and furious start for the product line, this deserves 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Languard Locations: Low City (SNE)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

Creator Reply:
I'm delighted you've enjoyed the start of this series so much, old chum! I'm running my own campaign in Languard at the moment and am having a blast!
City Backdrop: Languard
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/23/2018 04:56:30

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive settlement supplement clocks in at 29 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 23 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, in case you didn’t get that immediately: This is basically the MUCH bigger brother of the beloved Village Backdrops-series, and this time around, we take a look at the “crown jewel” of sorts of the Duchy of Ashlar, the region that serves as a rough geographic backdrop for many of Raging Swan Press’ more recent supplements.

Housing a population of almost 8000 souls, Languard is a relatively cosmopolitan city for the region, with approximately 1/8th of the population belonging to the classic humanoid player-races. The city does include notes on the lie of the land (interesting to note: That’s the British version of “lay of the land”), and, as we’ve come to expect from Raging Swan Press’ settlement supplements, it does come with lore pertaining the settlement that the PCs may just know. Dressing habits, appearances and local nomenclature are covered as well.

Oh, and in the PFRPG-version, we do actually get the proper city statblock information. It should also be noted that we get a nice magic item marketplace section.

Present in every iteration of this supplement would be something that put a HUGE smile on my face: Tommi Salama’s excellent b/w-cartography if provided in not one, but two versions – one that sports labels and keys, and one that is fully player-friendly! Yep, you can print out or use the city map as is sans fuss in VTTs! HUGE kudos and thanks for that!

Now, it has been a tradition in these settlement supplements, that we should get some whispers and rumors, right? Well, this time around, we get a whole page, chockfull with hooks, correct and false information…and yes, these are surprisingly diverse. More bodies fished from the aptly-named Svart (which btw. translates to “Black”), rumors that provide connections in an unobtrusive manner with villages…rather cool!

Here’s the thing, though – most city supplements have an issue regarding the organization of content. Languard is very smart here: Letters denote types of location (“T” stands for “Temple”, for example), and also uses this approach to denote that some place belongs to one of the different quarters the city houses. “F”, to give you another example, means that the place can be found in the “Fishshambles.” Locations are listed by quarter, as well as by type, all on one page, which makes it rather easy to always know where what is. The pdf devotes a lot of loving care to talk about these immediately useful places, from the fortifications to the respective places. The quarters list the respective notable NPCs in fluff-only descriptions where they’re most likely to be encountered, and every quarter gets its own dressing/event table to add local flavor to the respective environments and set them apart from one another.

Beyond notes on the daily life in noisy and rather grimy Languard, we also get notes on the taxes and tariffs levied in the city – an aspect all too often neglected and forgotten. Law is covered as well as all those aspects of city life that the PCs may encounter. The pdf even provides information on accommodations, food and drink prices…and goes one step further, providing designated adventure hooks to pursue, in the exceedingly unlikely case that just exploring this place won’t suffice to yield a plethora of adventures. Did I mention the human ethnicity that is discriminated against, the Takolen, who suspiciously often live near the water? The notes on means to get your PCs to Gloamhold, if they’re in the mood for a massive dungeon? From politicking to slumming, from grime and grit to cults and dangers, Languard has a ton to offer. Did I mention the guilds?

Oh, and did I mention that the city supplement comes with a handy one-page handout, the Player#s Guide to Languard? Give your players the page and map and you’re pretty much set to go, no need for hour-long explanatory rambling, no annoying need to skim through the book to eliminate possible spoilers. This is as user-friendly as can be!!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch on a formal and rules-language level. I noticed no serious hiccups. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports nice b/w-artworks. The cartography by Tommi Salama is excellent. The pdf comes in two versions, one optimized for screen-use, and one intended to be printed out (YEAH!). The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Creighton Broadhurst succeeds at a rather impressive task: To provide an overview of a massive city in just a few pages, to depict the complexities of daily life and the differences in tone and character of the different quarters; you will not confuse any of those locations with one another, and the pdf contains enough hooks, dressing and ideas to make Languard come to life…and best of all, there is actually a whole series devoted to going into depth regarding the individual sections of the city. Guess what I’ll be covering next? ;) Anyhow, this supplement succeeds in presenting an overview of a city that breathes old-school vibes, that feels positively medieval. Languard sports this gritty, Greyhawk-ish vibe I enjoy; the same atmosphere that you got from the grimy cities depicted in the Witcher novels. All in all, this is an awesome city supplement, well worth a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval. (As an aside – this is my favorite of the 3 versions.)

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
City Backdrop: Languard
Click to show product description

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Creator Reply:
Thank you, Endzeitgeist. I love the review and I'm particularly delighted with the Greyhawk comparison!
City Backdrop: Languard (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/23/2018 04:55:26

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive settlement supplement clocks in at 29 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 23 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, in case you didn’t get that immediately: This is basically the MUCH bigger brother of the beloved Village Backdrops-series, and this time around, we take a look at the “crown jewel” of sorts of the Duchy of Ashlar, the region that serves as a rough geographic backdrop for many of Raging Swan Press’ more recent supplements.

Housing a population of almost 8000 souls, Languard is a relatively cosmopolitan city for the region, with approximately 1/8th of the population belonging to the classic humanoid player-races. The city does include notes on the lie of the land (interesting to note: That’s the British version of “lay of the land”), and, as we’ve come to expect from Raging Swan Press’ settlement supplements, it does come with lore pertaining the settlement that the PCs may just know. Dressing habits, appearances and local nomenclature are covered as well.

The 5e-version has had its DCs, where applicable, converted correctly, and NPC statblock-references point towards the defaults established. The magic item market place has similarly been adjusted to reflect 5e’s aesthetics.

Present in every iteration of this supplement would be something that put a HUGE smile on my face: Tommi Salama’s excellent b/w-cartography if provided in not one, but two versions – one that sports labels and keys, and one that is fully player-friendly! Yep, you can print out or use the city map as is sans fuss in VTTs! HUGE kudos and thanks for that!

Now, it has been a tradition in these settlement supplements, that we should get some whispers and rumors, right? Well, this time around, we get a whole page, chockfull with hooks, correct and false information…and yes, these are surprisingly diverse. More bodies fished from the aptly-named Svart (which btw. translates to “Black”), rumors that provide connections in an unobtrusive manner with villages…rather cool!

Here’s the thing, though – most city supplements have an issue regarding the organization of content. Languard is very smart here: Letters denote types of location (“T” stands for “Temple”, for example), and also uses this approach to denote that some place belongs to one of the different quarters the city houses. “F”, to give you another example, means that the place can be found in the “Fishshambles.” Locations are listed by quarter, as well as by type, all on one page, which makes it rather easy to always know where what is. The pdf devotes a lot of loving care to talk about these immediately useful places, from the fortifications to the respective places. The quarters list the respective notable NPCs in fluff-only descriptions where they’re most likely to be encountered, and every quarter gets its own dressing/event table to add local flavor to the respective environments and set them apart from one another.

Beyond notes on the daily life in noisy and rather grimy Languard, we also get notes on the taxes and tariffs levied in the city – an aspect all too often neglected and forgotten. Law is covered as well as all those aspects of city life that the PCs may encounter. The pdf even provides information on accommodations, food and drink prices…and goes one step further, providing designated adventure hooks to pursue, in the exceedingly unlikely case that just exploring this place won’t suffice to yield a plethora of adventures. Did I mention the human ethnicity that is discriminated against, the Takolen, who suspiciously often live near the water? The notes on means to get your PCs to Gloamhold, if they’re in the mood for a massive dungeon? From politicking to slumming, from grime and grit to cults and dangers, Languard has a ton to offer. Did I mention the guilds?

Oh, and did I mention that the city supplement comes with a handy one-page handout, the Player#s Guide to Languard? Give your players the page and map and you’re pretty much set to go, no need for hour-long explanatory rambling, no annoying need to skim through the book to eliminate possible spoilers. This is as user-friendly as can be!!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch on a formal and rules-language level. I noticed no serious hiccups. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard, and the pdf sports nice b/w-artworks. The cartography by Tommi Salama is excellent. The pdf comes in two versions, one optimized for screen-use, and one intended to be printed out (YEAH!). The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Creighton Broadhurst succeeds at a rather impressive task: To provide an overview of a massive city in just a few pages, to depict the complexities of daily life and the differences in tone and character of the different quarters; you will not confuse any of those locations with one another, and the pdf contains enough hooks, dressing and ideas to make Languard come to life…and best of all, there is actually a whole series devoted to going into depth regarding the individual sections of the city. Guess what I’ll be covering next? ;) Anyhow, this supplement succeeds in presenting an overview of a city that breathes old-school vibes, that feels positively medieval. Languard sports this gritty, Greyhawk-ish vibe I enjoy; the same atmosphere that you got from the grimy cities depicted in the Witcher novels. The 5e-version is just as strong as the PFRPG-version, and thus, also gets a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
City Backdrop: Languard (5e)
Click to show product description

Add to RPGNow.com Order

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