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    Quick Worlds 16: Serapis
    by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/17/2012 07:01:57

    Originally Published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/01/17/quickworldsfortraveller/

    Quick Worlds 16: Serapis – A water-heavy world, with a dictatorial government grown out of a rebellion against a centuries-old monarchy. A prison planet where those who are too valuable to kill outright can be stored (perhaps even including the dictator’s mother!). The first reference to winding back the clock, and playing through the rebellion on one side or the other. Also the first reference to Blaylock Mining, who will appear in other, future supplements as a possible patron or enemy.

    So you’re GMing a game of Traveller, and your players decide to pull a fast one on you. No matter how you guide them, they have made up their minds to pull up stakes and head to a different system, abandoning the one on which you invested so much time in setup and preparation. They hop in their Free Trader and hit the jump button, arriving somewhere else entirely, expecting you to pull adventure and excitement out of your… well, you know where.

    What do you do?

    Of course you can just stop your game for a while, pull out the books and generate a world, or even pick one off of the map you have drawn up with some loosely generated world stats. Then you’re either wasting more precious gaming time coming up with new plots and hooks and double-crosses, or you’re winging it for the rest of the session.

    Or you can pull out one of the Quick Worlds series from Gypsy Knight Games!

    Each supplement is a complete survey of a system in it’s entirety. Everything that can be easily detailed is, including a full survey of all of the stars, planets, moons and the like in the system, as well as the civilizations that reside upon them.

    Most of the books come with some depiction in addition to the text of the layout of the system, either with a map of the orbits, or for a world with a significant number of moons, a map of that world and all of her satellites. In addition, the primary world will be mapped out in the traditional, “world as a 20 sided die” Icosahedral projection, with indicators of terrain type and the location of major cities and starports.

    At the world level, descriptions of the terrain and atmosphere, as well as the presence of any seas of note are made, as well as a general survey of the climate on the world. Major cities are discussed, and government and legal systems are broken down in more detail than can be represented by a single die-roll. This tends to be where the plot hooks begin to pop up in inset boxes, with indications of how real conditions are in comparison to how the world itself wants to be perceived. Each city and spaceport is described, to some level of detail, without going into too much depth..

    Finally, further information about the system as a whole, and how it interacts with visitors and its neighbors is discussed, and plot hooks and ideas are expanded upon, with a focus upon the sort of character background that might find a reason to come to this particular world – be it a mercenary company that could be hired to put down a rebellion, or an agent or scoundrel working one side or the other of a smuggling operation.

    The content of the books are top notch and generally useful. The presentation, on the other hand, leaves a little something to be desired. Already short texts, the first two pages of each PDF are the cover art and credits, and the last two are the standard licensing boilerplate, leaving some of the books to less than ten total pages of content. This wouldn’t be the end of the world for a $4 product, but a frank look at the presentation of that content immediately shows where layout tricks were employed to pad things further. Margins are a full inch and a half, with an additional half-inch “gutter between the two columns. Combine this with a 14 point font, and things go quickly from “published book” to “freshman English essay” territory.

    A better solution, albeit a less financially beneficial one, would be to take these guides and merge them together into a series of books. Each one would have two, three, or even five complete systems in them. The font could be normalized, and the margins shrunk, and it would still give 20 or so pages of solid content, which could be sold for a very understandable $12 or so.

    Are they useful? Heck yes – they can be a real lifesaver. That said, I don’t know that I’d invest in them myself, as I could fairly easily generate these statistics from Book 6:Scouts (Classic Traveller), and come up with the necessary military, political or corporate intrigue on my own. If you’re just starting out, though, they make a great primer on what real preparation for a “sandbox” game looks like.



    Rating:
    [3 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 16: Serapis
    Click to show product description

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    Quick Worlds 15: Vasynov
    by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/17/2012 07:01:22

    Originally Published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/01/17/quickworldsfortraveller/

    Quick Worlds 15: Vasynov – An open and fickle society, ruled as a participatory democracy, where the whims of the majority are indulged, and culture can change swiftly as the pendulum of public opinion swings both ways on an issue. The cities are underground, and no surface water exists. Room exists for intrigue amongst the asteroid belt miners, with two companies squaring off. And conflict can be manufactured from the current political layout that denies the vote to any citizen in the system who doesn’t live on or under the surface of the primary world.

    So you’re GMing a game of Traveller, and your players decide to pull a fast one on you. No matter how you guide them, they have made up their minds to pull up stakes and head to a different system, abandoning the one on which you invested so much time in setup and preparation. They hop in their Free Trader and hit the jump button, arriving somewhere else entirely, expecting you to pull adventure and excitement out of your… well, you know where.

    What do you do?

    Of course you can just stop your game for a while, pull out the books and generate a world, or even pick one off of the map you have drawn up with some loosely generated world stats. Then you’re either wasting more precious gaming time coming up with new plots and hooks and double-crosses, or you’re winging it for the rest of the session.

    Or you can pull out one of the Quick Worlds series from Gypsy Knight Games!

    Each supplement is a complete survey of a system in it’s entirety. Everything that can be easily detailed is, including a full survey of all of the stars, planets, moons and the like in the system, as well as the civilizations that reside upon them.

    Most of the books come with some depiction in addition to the text of the layout of the system, either with a map of the orbits, or for a world with a significant number of moons, a map of that world and all of her satellites. In addition, the primary world will be mapped out in the traditional, “world as a 20 sided die” Icosahedral projection, with indicators of terrain type and the location of major cities and starports.

    At the world level, descriptions of the terrain and atmosphere, as well as the presence of any seas of note are made, as well as a general survey of the climate on the world. Major cities are discussed, and government and legal systems are broken down in more detail than can be represented by a single die-roll. This tends to be where the plot hooks begin to pop up in inset boxes, with indications of how real conditions are in comparison to how the world itself wants to be perceived. Each city and spaceport is described, to some level of detail, without going into too much depth..

    Finally, further information about the system as a whole, and how it interacts with visitors and its neighbors is discussed, and plot hooks and ideas are expanded upon, with a focus upon the sort of character background that might find a reason to come to this particular world – be it a mercenary company that could be hired to put down a rebellion, or an agent or scoundrel working one side or the other of a smuggling operation.

    The content of the books are top notch and generally useful. The presentation, on the other hand, leaves a little something to be desired. Already short texts, the first two pages of each PDF are the cover art and credits, and the last two are the standard licensing boilerplate, leaving some of the books to less than ten total pages of content. This wouldn’t be the end of the world for a $4 product, but a frank look at the presentation of that content immediately shows where layout tricks were employed to pad things further. Margins are a full inch and a half, with an additional half-inch “gutter between the two columns. Combine this with a 14 point font, and things go quickly from “published book” to “freshman English essay” territory.

    A better solution, albeit a less financially beneficial one, would be to take these guides and merge them together into a series of books. Each one would have two, three, or even five complete systems in them. The font could be normalized, and the margins shrunk, and it would still give 20 or so pages of solid content, which could be sold for a very understandable $12 or so.

    Are they useful? Heck yes – they can be a real lifesaver. That said, I don’t know that I’d invest in them myself, as I could fairly easily generate these statistics from Book 6:Scouts (Classic Traveller), and come up with the necessary military, political or corporate intrigue on my own. If you’re just starting out, though, they make a great primer on what real preparation for a “sandbox” game looks like.



    Rating:
    [3 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 15: Vasynov
    Click to show product description

    Add to  Order

    Quick Worlds 14: Hiallt
    by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/17/2012 07:00:47

    Originally Published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/01/17/quickworldsfortraveller/

    Quick Worlds 14: Hiallt – A mostly desert planet, with a quirky government of despotic rule for rigidly enforced 15-year terms. A radical split between the young and unmarried versus the married in terms of sexuality and sexual mores. More political intrigue as the Duke, an elected role, is about to end his term. Possible survival adventure in the high deserts, and perhaps even the chance to find long forgotten colonies of people out where nobody thinks anyone lives.

    So you’re GMing a game of Traveller, and your players decide to pull a fast one on you. No matter how you guide them, they have made up their minds to pull up stakes and head to a different system, abandoning the one on which you invested so much time in setup and preparation. They hop in their Free Trader and hit the jump button, arriving somewhere else entirely, expecting you to pull adventure and excitement out of your… well, you know where.

    What do you do?

    Of course you can just stop your game for a while, pull out the books and generate a world, or even pick one off of the map you have drawn up with some loosely generated world stats. Then you’re either wasting more precious gaming time coming up with new plots and hooks and double-crosses, or you’re winging it for the rest of the session.

    Or you can pull out one of the Quick Worlds series from Gypsy Knight Games!

    Each supplement is a complete survey of a system in it’s entirety. Everything that can be easily detailed is, including a full survey of all of the stars, planets, moons and the like in the system, as well as the civilizations that reside upon them.

    Most of the books come with some depiction in addition to the text of the layout of the system, either with a map of the orbits, or for a world with a significant number of moons, a map of that world and all of her satellites. In addition, the primary world will be mapped out in the traditional, “world as a 20 sided die” Icosahedral projection, with indicators of terrain type and the location of major cities and starports.

    At the world level, descriptions of the terrain and atmosphere, as well as the presence of any seas of note are made, as well as a general survey of the climate on the world. Major cities are discussed, and government and legal systems are broken down in more detail than can be represented by a single die-roll. This tends to be where the plot hooks begin to pop up in inset boxes, with indications of how real conditions are in comparison to how the world itself wants to be perceived. Each city and spaceport is described, to some level of detail, without going into too much depth..

    Finally, further information about the system as a whole, and how it interacts with visitors and its neighbors is discussed, and plot hooks and ideas are expanded upon, with a focus upon the sort of character background that might find a reason to come to this particular world – be it a mercenary company that could be hired to put down a rebellion, or an agent or scoundrel working one side or the other of a smuggling operation.

    The content of the books are top notch and generally useful. The presentation, on the other hand, leaves a little something to be desired. Already short texts, the first two pages of each PDF are the cover art and credits, and the last two are the standard licensing boilerplate, leaving some of the books to less than ten total pages of content. This wouldn’t be the end of the world for a $4 product, but a frank look at the presentation of that content immediately shows where layout tricks were employed to pad things further. Margins are a full inch and a half, with an additional half-inch “gutter between the two columns. Combine this with a 14 point font, and things go quickly from “published book” to “freshman English essay” territory.

    A better solution, albeit a less financially beneficial one, would be to take these guides and merge them together into a series of books. Each one would have two, three, or even five complete systems in them. The font could be normalized, and the margins shrunk, and it would still give 20 or so pages of solid content, which could be sold for a very understandable $12 or so.

    Are they useful? Heck yes – they can be a real lifesaver. That said, I don’t know that I’d invest in them myself, as I could fairly easily generate these statistics from Book 6:Scouts (Classic Traveller), and come up with the necessary military, political or corporate intrigue on my own. If you’re just starting out, though, they make a great primer on what real preparation for a “sandbox” game looks like.



    Rating:
    [3 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 14: Hiallt
    Click to show product description

    Add to  Order

    Quick Worlds 13: Chennai
    by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/17/2012 07:00:16

    Originally Published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/01/17/quickworldsfortraveller/

    Quick Worlds 13: Chennai – a seeming Utopia, the people of Chennai might wind up being the worst enemies of your player characters – you see, they like their government, and tend to see the police as being entirely beneficial to their well-being. Smugglers take note, the prices might be good, but most everyone is going to be helping out the opposition. More chances for some adventure related to travel through jungles, or by way of political intrigue as part of the otherwise carefully controlled political process.

    So you’re GMing a game of Traveller, and your players decide to pull a fast one on you. No matter how you guide them, they have made up their minds to pull up stakes and head to a different system, abandoning the one on which you invested so much time in setup and preparation. They hop in their Free Trader and hit the jump button, arriving somewhere else entirely, expecting you to pull adventure and excitement out of your… well, you know where.

    What do you do?

    Of course you can just stop your game for a while, pull out the books and generate a world, or even pick one off of the map you have drawn up with some loosely generated world stats. Then you’re either wasting more precious gaming time coming up with new plots and hooks and double-crosses, or you’re winging it for the rest of the session.

    Or you can pull out one of the Quick Worlds series from Gypsy Knight Games!

    Each supplement is a complete survey of a system in it’s entirety. Everything that can be easily detailed is, including a full survey of all of the stars, planets, moons and the like in the system, as well as the civilizations that reside upon them.

    Most of the books come with some depiction in addition to the text of the layout of the system, either with a map of the orbits, or for a world with a significant number of moons, a map of that world and all of her satellites. In addition, the primary world will be mapped out in the traditional, “world as a 20 sided die” Icosahedral projection, with indicators of terrain type and the location of major cities and starports.

    At the world level, descriptions of the terrain and atmosphere, as well as the presence of any seas of note are made, as well as a general survey of the climate on the world. Major cities are discussed, and government and legal systems are broken down in more detail than can be represented by a single die-roll. This tends to be where the plot hooks begin to pop up in inset boxes, with indications of how real conditions are in comparison to how the world itself wants to be perceived. Each city and spaceport is described, to some level of detail, without going into too much depth..

    Finally, further information about the system as a whole, and how it interacts with visitors and its neighbors is discussed, and plot hooks and ideas are expanded upon, with a focus upon the sort of character background that might find a reason to come to this particular world – be it a mercenary company that could be hired to put down a rebellion, or an agent or scoundrel working one side or the other of a smuggling operation.

    The content of the books are top notch and generally useful. The presentation, on the other hand, leaves a little something to be desired. Already short texts, the first two pages of each PDF are the cover art and credits, and the last two are the standard licensing boilerplate, leaving some of the books to less than ten total pages of content. This wouldn’t be the end of the world for a $4 product, but a frank look at the presentation of that content immediately shows where layout tricks were employed to pad things further. Margins are a full inch and a half, with an additional half-inch “gutter between the two columns. Combine this with a 14 point font, and things go quickly from “published book” to “freshman English essay” territory.

    A better solution, albeit a less financially beneficial one, would be to take these guides and merge them together into a series of books. Each one would have two, three, or even five complete systems in them. The font could be normalized, and the margins shrunk, and it would still give 20 or so pages of solid content, which could be sold for a very understandable $12 or so.

    Are they useful? Heck yes – they can be a real lifesaver. That said, I don’t know that I’d invest in them myself, as I could fairly easily generate these statistics from Book 6:Scouts (Classic Traveller), and come up with the necessary military, political or corporate intrigue on my own. If you’re just starting out, though, they make a great primer on what real preparation for a “sandbox” game looks like.



    Rating:
    [3 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 13: Chennai
    Click to show product description

    Add to  Order

    Quick Worlds 12: Megara
    by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/17/2012 06:59:35

    Originally Published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/01/17/quickworldsfortraveller/

    Quick Worlds 12: Megara – A cold, high-tech world (though little about the world as presented demands that it be such) laboring under the yoke of not terribly charismatic dictator, third in a dynasty, Megara is a world on the brink of revolution. It provides a place where the secret police tries to keep an eye on everything, but the power at the center is losing it’s hold. It’s a venue for revolution, for smuggling, and for all manner of political intrigue.

    So you’re GMing a game of Traveller, and your players decide to pull a fast one on you. No matter how you guide them, they have made up their minds to pull up stakes and head to a different system, abandoning the one on which you invested so much time in setup and preparation. They hop in their Free Trader and hit the jump button, arriving somewhere else entirely, expecting you to pull adventure and excitement out of your… well, you know where.

    What do you do?

    Of course you can just stop your game for a while, pull out the books and generate a world, or even pick one off of the map you have drawn up with some loosely generated world stats. Then you’re either wasting more precious gaming time coming up with new plots and hooks and double-crosses, or you’re winging it for the rest of the session.

    Or you can pull out one of the Quick Worlds series from Gypsy Knight Games!

    Each supplement is a complete survey of a system in it’s entirety. Everything that can be easily detailed is, including a full survey of all of the stars, planets, moons and the like in the system, as well as the civilizations that reside upon them.

    Most of the books come with some depiction in addition to the text of the layout of the system, either with a map of the orbits, or for a world with a significant number of moons, a map of that world and all of her satellites. In addition, the primary world will be mapped out in the traditional, “world as a 20 sided die” Icosahedral projection, with indicators of terrain type and the location of major cities and starports.

    At the world level, descriptions of the terrain and atmosphere, as well as the presence of any seas of note are made, as well as a general survey of the climate on the world. Major cities are discussed, and government and legal systems are broken down in more detail than can be represented by a single die-roll. This tends to be where the plot hooks begin to pop up in inset boxes, with indications of how real conditions are in comparison to how the world itself wants to be perceived. Each city and spaceport is described, to some level of detail, without going into too much depth..

    Finally, further information about the system as a whole, and how it interacts with visitors and its neighbors is discussed, and plot hooks and ideas are expanded upon, with a focus upon the sort of character background that might find a reason to come to this particular world – be it a mercenary company that could be hired to put down a rebellion, or an agent or scoundrel working one side or the other of a smuggling operation.

    The content of the books are top notch and generally useful. The presentation, on the other hand, leaves a little something to be desired. Already short texts, the first two pages of each PDF are the cover art and credits, and the last two are the standard licensing boilerplate, leaving some of the books to less than ten total pages of content. This wouldn’t be the end of the world for a $4 product, but a frank look at the presentation of that content immediately shows where layout tricks were employed to pad things further. Margins are a full inch and a half, with an additional half-inch “gutter between the two columns. Combine this with a 14 point font, and things go quickly from “published book” to “freshman English essay” territory.

    A better solution, albeit a less financially beneficial one, would be to take these guides and merge them together into a series of books. Each one would have two, three, or even five complete systems in them. The font could be normalized, and the margins shrunk, and it would still give 20 or so pages of solid content, which could be sold for a very understandable $12 or so.

    Are they useful? Heck yes – they can be a real lifesaver. That said, I don’t know that I’d invest in them myself, as I could fairly easily generate these statistics from Book 6:Scouts (Classic Traveller), and come up with the necessary military, political or corporate intrigue on my own. If you’re just starting out, though, they make a great primer on what real preparation for a “sandbox” game looks like.



    Rating:
    [3 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 12: Megara
    Click to show product description

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    21 Plots
    by Mysterious B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/09/2012 18:15:38

    This early version shows a clear love of the game - unlike 1001 Patrons this book was written with the love of old Classic Traveller in mind - even though, it is not set in the Classic Imperium - there are no excesses each adventure hook is nicely balanced and provides an interesting segway for adventure that treats the players and referee as actors in a much larger drama just merely hinted at. The plots are believable and enjoyable. Cannot wait to see more from this company.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    21 Plots
    Click to show product description

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    21 Plots Too
    by Mysterious B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/09/2012 18:12:42

    An excellent cover and excellent plot hooks that build upon the earlier book of adventure seeds (21 Plots) like its predecessor volume, it shows the authors really get Traveller and have no qualms about the love of the game. Very few plots are extravagant or unbelievable, even nicer is that these plot hooks are hooked up with worlds with the Cascadia subsector (although a Referee can easily determine how do a setup without buying all those worlds or subsector book - just (s)he will have do more legwork). Excellent art round it all out.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    21 Plots Too
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    Subsector Sourcebook 1: Cascadia
    by Mysterious B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/09/2012 18:07:33

    This is nice book outlining all the Quick Worlds till the date of publication from a company that truly has broken the mold of generic worlds found in most Science Fiction tropes. True there are some worlds that are farcical and others that are deadly serious - both have their place in this subsector sourcebook. This is one key to a larger puzzle that Gypsy Knight Games is slowly unveiling as part of their ATU. It has excellent production values and certainly worth the price - if there be any Referee would needs a subsector filled with interesting and interconnected worlds.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Subsector Sourcebook 1: Cascadia
    Click to show product description

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    Quick Worlds 20: Atargatis
    by Gregory W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/06/2012 20:08:42

    I really like what comes in the Quick Worlds PDF. The description and detail are good and the adventure hooks are original and useful.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 20: Atargatis
    Click to show product description

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    Quick Worlds 20: Atargatis
    by William W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/21/2011 12:05:02

    No prob at all with the download. As with all of the Gypsy Knights Games Quick World supplements , this is a quality product. At free you can't beat it and even not free a valuable resourse for the busy Traveller GM or any GM running a space or sci-fi game. There is no reason the info contained here couldn't be used for GURPS, Star Wars, or any number of like games. Give it a try, you won't regret it.

    William



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 20: Atargatis
    by Alysa H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/19/2011 13:06:41

    File can't be found when you try to download this...



    Rating:
    [3 of 5 Stars!]
    Creator Reply:
    Drive-thru is apparently experiencing some sort of difficulty that causes 1 out of 3 purchases to not be able to download the file. Not sure what the problem is, but I have reported it to them. Sorry you had problems, but hopefully they can fix this soon.
    The problem with the link has now been repaired. Sorry you had trouble.
    Quick Worlds 11: Chance
    by John S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/19/2011 17:05:04

    No risk here, Chance offers a GM a good base to build adventures around. Gambling and the associated vices around it have an interesting home on Chance. Background mixed with adventure hooks should give a GM plenty to cook up. The only negative, for me, is that the supplement could have used a couple of games of chance as flavor as well as some notable npcs. Place your bets.



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 11: Chance
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    Subsector Sourcebook 1: Cascadia
    by Peter P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/30/2011 13:32:54

    An excellent product for those gamemasters who don't have the time to create a sector from scratch. I am an avid Traveller fan and I love the developed regions for the game but I wanted to run some adventures outside of Imperial Space. This helped me allot.



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Subsector Sourcebook 1: Cascadia
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    Quick Worlds 12: Megara
    by P-O B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/20/2011 14:10:50

    Megara - For the blood thirsty August 20th, 2011 by BeRKA

    Megara is the 12:th of the “Quick Worlds” from Gypsy Knights Games. This might not be the most interesting one in the series, but it is still a useful one.

    The idea is that a referee can use this (or the other books in this series) in his/her own universe to save some time when a more detailed world is needed. The referee can then change anything (e.g. the name of the planet or the UWP) to fit a planet in his/her own universe.

    The planet Megara has a UWP of C9887B7-D. If you want to match it with a planet in the OTU, then maybe the planet Dakar in the Ilelish Sector is a good match. Dakar has a UWP of B9887BB-A. Any planet with a star-port between A-E, size 6-9, atm 8, hydro 8, pop 7-8, gov B, law 7-C and tech-level 6-D would probably work fine. It is actually impossible to create the UWP of Megara using classic rules. The tech-level is too high. But nothing in this pdf suggests that the tech-level must be this high. There is a maglev train, but that might be imported.

    In this pdf, there are descriptions of the system with an image of the gas giant, and an overview image of the system. There are some general description of the planet Megara, and an isodecahedron map. Then there are some more specific descriptions of the planet and the people and cities and politics, and of the big herd animals called Betas. Finally there are a few adventure hooks.

    What I would have wished for would have been some more detailed adventure hooks, an image of the Betas (and animal encounter tables), some notes on gas giant refuelling (since the gas giant is within the 100 solar diameters from the sun) and maybe some notes on the seasons due the the eccentric orbit.

    There are also some other problems with this pdf. I hope Gypsy Knight Games (and other publishers) will learn from this constructive criticism and avoid such problems in the future.

    The first problem is the colour bleeding on the cover. I don’t want to see that on a commercial product.

    Solution: Don’t compress the images so hard, and don’t reuse already compressed images.

    The second problem is that there are green patches that look like land on the image of the gas giant, and the background is black without any stars. It looks like it has been made using some simple (web-based) planet generator and it doesn’t look like a gas giant.

    Solution: Learn to use some graphics tools, or hire someone who can!

    The third problem is the 501 day orbital period. This just doesn’t work for a G4V star and a 0.998 AU orbit. This violates Kepler’s third law. To make the year about 500 days, then the solar mass would be appr. 0.5 solar masses. That would suggest that either the star is a type K star in the cooler regions, or it might also be a type G4, if it is a sub dwarf. In either way, Megara would be a lot cooler. If I use this module, then I would just ignore this and calculate my own orbital period.

    Solution: Double check the physics in your product.

    Update: The third problem has been corrected in a new version uploaded to DriveThruRPG. It’s a good thing when a suggestion in a review can help the product improve. Now I know how the Top Gear presenters felt when they convinced Koenigsegg to fit a rear spoiler on their CCX. ;-)



    Rating:
    [4 of 5 Stars!]
    Quick Worlds 12: Megara
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    21 Plots
    by Daniel H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/06/2011 10:51:47

    Nicely done, and does exactly what it says on the cover. For Traveller players, the classic "Patron" format is familiar - you are given a brief situation setup, the reward, and then a list of 1-6 possibly complications. The intent is that the GM will secretly roll one of these so the players never know exactly what they are in for, but of course the GM can riff on the theme or just choose one of the options that fits his or her campaign the best.

    The plots themselves are good, general and full of potential. I could see using well over half of them in my own game without any modifications. And at least one plot would be fun to play "inside out", with the players being the ones to try to stop some other group from completing the mission.

    If you are a GM who likes having a set of "Patron Encounters", you should consider adding these plots to your staple.



    Rating:
    [5 of 5 Stars!]
    21 Plots
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