Little Wars
DriveThruComics
DriveThruFiction
Powered by DriveThruRPG


Home » Wizards of the Coast » Reviews
Browse Categories













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
You must be logged in to rate this
Players Handbook (1e)
by Mauro L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/11/2019 19:14:11

Absolutly stunning premium print. Realy I love it. Now I want monster manual in POD!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Players Handbook (1e)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

Infernal Font
by Jarrod T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/10/2019 22:48:17

A very fun font. I look forward to seeing what (hopeful) language might be next!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Infernal Font
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

Monster Manual (1e)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/10/2019 22:16:14

This is the book. This is the book that got me into D&D and RPGs.

But how does one review such a genre-defining classic?

My son had made himself a triple cheeseburger covered in bacon, onions, and mushrooms. I asked him how he was going to fit that into his mouth. He said, "with determination".

How does one review such a genre-defining classic? With determination.

My History

The Monster Manual was the book for me. The one that got me hooked. The one, sitting in "silent reading" back in 1979 at Washington Elementary School in Jacksonville, IL that I became the über-geek you all know today. How über? I used the freaking umlauts, that's my street cred right there.

Back in '79 I was reading a lot of Greek Myths, I loved reading about all the gods, goddesses and monsters. So I saw my friend's Monster Manual and saw all those cool monsters and I knew I had to have a copy. Though getting one in my tiny near-bible-belt town was not easy. Not hard mind you, by the early 1980s the local book store stocked them, but I was not there yet. So I borrowed his and read. And read. And read. I think I had the damn thing memorized long before I ever got my own game going.

Since that time I judge a gamebook on the "Monster Manual" scale. How close of a feeling do I get from a book or game compared to the scale limit of holding the Monster Manual for the first time? Some games have come close and others have hit the mark as well. C.J. Carella's WitchCraft gave me the same feeling.

Also, I like to go to the monster section of any book or get their monster books. Sure I guess sometimes there are diminishing returns, Monster Manual V for 3.5 anyone? But even then sometimes you get a Fiend Folio (which I liked thankyouverymuch).

This book captured my imagination like no other gamebook. Even the 1st DMG, which is a work of art, had to wait till I was older to appreciate it. The Monster Manual grabbed me and took me for a ride.

The Book (and PDF)

The PDF of the Monster Manual has been available since July of 2015. The book itself has seen three different covers.

Regardless of what cover you have the insides are all the same. The book is 112 pages, black and white art from some of the biggest names that ever graced the pages of an RPG book.

This book was the first of so many things we now take for granted in this industry. The first hardcover, the first dedicated monster tome, the first AD&D book.

The book contains 350 plus monsters of various difficulties for all character levels. Some of the most iconic monsters in D&D began right here. Mostly culled from the pages of OD&D, even some of the art is similar, and the pages of The Dragon, this was and is the definitive book on monsters.

Eldritch Wizardry gave us the demons, but the Monster Manual gave us those and all the new devils. The Monster Manual introduced us to the devils and the Nine Hells. Additionally, we got the new metallic dragons, more powerful and more diverse undead and many more monsters. We also got many sub-races of the "big 3". Elves get wood, aquatic, half and drow. Dwarves get hill and mountain varieties. Halflings get the Tallfellows and Stouts. So not just more monsters, but more details on the monsters we already knew.

While designed for AD&D I used it with the Holmes Basic book. The two products had a similar style and to me seemed to work great together. It was 1979 and honestly, we did all sorts of things with our games back then. The games worked very well together.

Flipping through one of my physical copies, or paging through the PDF, now I get the same sense of wonder I did 40 years ago.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Monster Manual (1e)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
by Gabriel L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/05/2019 09:36:34

A melhor coletânea de regras e dicas que qualquer mestre pode usar em qualquer RPG da sua vida. Eu chamaria esse livro de Bíblia do RPG.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

D&D Basic Set Rulebook (B/X ed.) (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/04/2019 22:39:37

Christmas 1981 will forever go down in my memory as the one where everything changed. I was in Junior High and had been playing D&D for a about two years, off and on. I had read the Monster Manual and I had a copy, badly xeroxed, of the Holmes Basic set. Christmas though was the turning point. I got two box sets that year; the Ballantine Books boxed set of Lord of the Rings and the "magenta" Basic Set. Inside was finally my own book, not a copy of someone else's book. I had my own dice (finally!) and a complete adventure. I devoured that book. Cover to cover. Every page was read and read over and over.

A lot of people talk about "the Red Box". My Red Box was magenta and had Erol Otis on the cover. For me this was the start of what became "my" D&D. Not someone else's game, but my own.

In 1981 I felt fairly proficient D&D. But with Holmes D&D I always felt like there was something I was missing. I only learned later of the "Little Brown Books" and how "Basic" actually came about.

The Moldvay Basic set had almost everything I ever needed for a game. Plenty of classes and races. More monsters than I expected (it had dragons!!) and what then felt like tons of spells. I made dozens of characters, some that saw actual game play, but I didn't care, for me it was the joy of endless possibilities. And that was just in the first couple of dozen pages.

Everything I know about exploring a dungeon, checking for traps, carrying holy water and 10' pole began here. I learned that ghouls can cause paralysis (unless you were an elf!) and that zombies always attacked last in the round. I learned Thouls were a magical cross-breed between a hobgoblin troll and ghoul. No I still have no idea how they are made. I got to meet Morgan Ironwolf herself. There was a sample adventure in the book, but I never really looked over. I don't think anyone did. It was called the Haunted Keep by the way.

This magenta colored box with strange art on the cover also had other prizes. There inside was my first set of real D&D dice. No more raiding board games for six-siders, though I learned that they were properly called "d6s". I had a set of blue dice with a white crayon to color them in. They are not great dice, even then I knew. But they were mine and that is all that mattered.

I want to pause here a second and come back to that art. Lets look at the cover again. A woman casting a spell, a man with a spear. Fighting some sort of water dragon (that didn't even appear in the rules!). But look how awesome it is. Do you need to know anything else? No. They are fighting a dragon! That box is the reason so many gamers fell in love with the art of Erol Otis. Inside are some equally important names; Jeff Dee, James Roslof, David LaForce and Bill Willingham. They gave this D&D a look that was different than AD&D. I love that art in AD&D, but in this book that art was just so...timeless. It was D&D.

In that box was also the Keep on Borderlands. I don't think I need to go into detail there. We have all been to the keep. We have all taken that ride out along the road that would take us to that Caves of Chaos. Nevermind that all these creatures, who should by all rights be attacking each other, never really did anything to me. They were there and they were "Chaotic" and we were "Lawful". That was all we needed to know back then.

The Moldvay Basic set was more than just an introductory set to D&D. It was an introduction to a hobby, a lifestyle. The rules were simply written and organized. They were not simple rules, and re-reading it today I marvel that we all conquered this stuff at age 10-11. It may have only covered the first 3 levels of character growth, but they were a quality 3.

I picked up the Expert Set for my birthday in 1982. Bought it myself, and for the longest time that was all I needed. Eventually I did move on to AD&D. I also discovered those Little Brown Books and even picked up my own real copy of Holmes Basic. I love those game and I love playing them still, but they never quite had the same magic as that first time of opening up that box and seeing what treasures were inside. I did not have to imagine how my characters felt when they had discovered some long lost treasure. I knew.

Today I still go back to Tom Moldvay's classic Basic book. It is my yardstick on how I measure any OSR game. Almost everything I need it right there. Just waiting for me.

Time to roll up some characters and play.

64 pages plus cover. Marbleized dice and crayon not included.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
D&D Basic Set Rulebook (B/X ed.) (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

DMR2 Creature Catalog (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/04/2019 22:36:22

Now I have gone on and on (and on and on) about how pivotable the AD&D 1st Ed Monster Manual was to my life in RPGs. So much so that I would later pick up any monster book that came out. I loved AD&D and played it all throughout my High School days and beyond. But it was Basic D&D, in particular, the B/X flavor of D&D that was my favorite. I wanted a Monster Manual for that game. Eventually, TSR granted my wish.

The next Creature Catalog (DMR2) came out in 1993 for the D&D Rules Cyclopedia. Most of the same monsters that appear in the Creature Catalog AC9 are here. In fact, a lot of the exact same art is used. The net difference is this book has 158 monsters. This book is the more customary 128 black & white pages with two, color covers. The monsters in this version are all listed alphabetically. This is also a much better scan and a print option is also available.

This book was designed for the Rules Cyclopedia and not BECMI the rules are 99% the same and thus both this and AC9 can be used interchangeably. DRM2 Creature Catalog came out at the same time as the AD&D 2nd edition Monstrous Compendiums so the layout and style reflects that. The color trim here is red instead of blue.

This PDF does bookmark every monster entry and since all monsters are listed together it is easier to find what you want here. Missing though is some of the advice in the earlier AC9 version.

But like the AC9 version, this is a fantastic book to use with your classic games or retro-clones of them.

In both books you won't find demons or devils since they were not part of the D&D world of Mystara, but that is not a big deal. For me, the loss is nothing compared the amount of undead both books have. Some of my favorite undead monsters to use to this very day made their appearances in these books. Elder Ghouls, Death Leaches, Dark Hoods, Grey Philosophers and Velyas still rank among my favorites.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
DMR2 Creature Catalog (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

AC9: D&D Creature Catalogue (Basic)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/04/2019 22:35:34

Now I have gone on and on (and on and on) about how pivotable the AD&D 1st Ed Monster Manual was to my life in RPGs. So much so that I would later pick up any monster book that came out. I loved AD&D and played it all throughout my High School days and beyond. But it was Basic D&D, in particular, the B/X flavor of D&D that was my favorite. I wanted a Monster Manual for that game. Eventually, TSR granted my wish. The Creature Catalog (AC9), came out in 1986 and was produced in conjunction with TSR UK and it would be one of the last books to do so. It shared a name with a series in Dragon Magazine (Issues #89 and #94), which led to some confusion on my part, but that was soon displaced. A bit of a background story. My then AD&D DM had grabbed this and let me borrow it. He knew I was a fan of D&D (Basic) and a fan of undead monsters, of which this had a lot of. I immediately started pouring over the book and loved all the new creatures in it and new versions of some that I considered "classic" by then. For example, the Umber Hulk (MM1) and the Hook Horror (FF) now shared an entry under "Hook Beast" and the Umber Hulk was now called a "Hulker". Given the time I just decided it was obviously the same beast and just called that in my version of Mystara and my DM kept Umber Hulk for his version of Greyhawk. Simple. Grabbing the PDF a while back I was hit by all these memories of flipping through the book and that sense of wonder came back. Monsters that I had used in games and have since forgotten about came rushing back to me. The PDF is a scan of the original book, so the quality is not 100%, more like 80% really. BUT that is not a reason not to get it. The text is still clear and the pictures, while not high-res are still legible. If nothing else the "imperfections" of the scan match my imperfect memory of the book. So point 1 for nostalgia purchase. The book itself is 96 black & white pages with color covers. There are about 150 monsters here (151 by my quick count). Some should be familiar to anyone that has been playing for a while, but there are also plenty of new ones that reflect the differences in design tone between D&D and AD&D. This book is separated by (and bookmarked by in the pdf) sections. The sections are Animals, Conjurations (magically created creatures), Humanoids, Lowlife, Monsters, and Undead. There are a lot of fun monsters here, many have made it into later editions of D&D, in particular, the Mystara Monstrous Compendium. The index is very nice since it also covers all the monsters in the various BEMCI books for a complete picture of the monsterography of the mid-80s D&D. If you are playing old-school D&D or a retro-clone of the same then this is a great little treat really. The book also has guidelines on where to put monsters and how to make alterations to the monster listing for a different creature. In fact a lot of what I have seen on some blogs and forums over the last couple years about how to "play monsters" has been better stated here. Yet more evidence that there is really nothing new out there. That and people don't read the classics anymore!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
AC9: D&D Creature Catalogue (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

One Grung Above (5e)
by Benjamin W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/02/2019 17:21:39

For $4.99, you can support Extra Life and get some bonus content.The grung race is nifty and the sample characters are mildly interesting.Overall, four pages of bonus material on top of a small charitable donation is always a great deal.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
One Grung Above (5e)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

Plane Shift: Dominaria
by Cindy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/26/2019 13:58:12

Plane Shift: Dominaria is a short supplement about the Magic: The Gathering world of Dominaria, a massive world with various domains, races, factions, creatures, and more. As the introduction by the creator mentions, this does not include Urborg, Shiv, and Yavimaya but does include Benalia, Serra, the Tolarian Academies, Vodalia, Belzenlok’s Cabal, Keld, and Llanowar. Each section includes information about the different races, dominant classes, special monsters, and, for most of them, how to build a character from these domains. Notable exceptions to playable races are the merfolk of Vodalia and Belzenlok’s Cabal. However, you do still learn about these domains and how to set adventures in them or pull villain’s from them. They’re very complete.

This is quite an extensive supplement and goes well with Guildmaster’s Guide to Ravnica, despite the fact that they are separate planes. However, both do talk about planes and peoples from the Magic: The Gathering universe and help convert them into D&D-compatible play. This really opens up a whole new world of play and helps give depth and complexity to planar shifts and inter-planar travel in the D&D world.

The supplement is well-written and beautifully creative with gorgeous, evocative artwork. It’s easy to understand, and the artwork helps you picture the world better as well as give you something to show your players. While I do wish there was playable information for Vodalia and the Cabal, I nonetheless love this supplement and have included it in my DM’s folder. A must have!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Plane Shift: Dominaria
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
by MARLON B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/24/2019 19:35:10

The Rules Cyclopedia is the best book to own if you want to play tabletop. There is no need to buy triple sets of books that add up to too much. This is the One Book to Rule them all.

This book contains all the rules you need to go from level 1 to level 36 if you manage to play the same character that long and there are adventues that will help you get there. A Long list of properly explained spells for your Clerics and Mages as well as in world explanatons for the apperance of Magic both Arcane and Divine and the explanations of The Spheres of Power. The book also contains rules for Weapon Mastery for many different weapons so not only could your Fighte Master his 2H Sword, but your Cleric can Master his Mace and The Thief Master his Dagger. If you want to do Mass Combat as in The Battle of Helm's Deep or the Battles of Beleriand/Gondolin for more adept players; there are rules for that too along with Naval and Aerial Combat. Many Monsters that are only available in this book are here to put the fangs back on the world. After your character is high enough Level and choses to retire, you can set up your own town or keep or tower or temple or guild; and there are rules for all that too. The book is even more amazing since it has in it a map of The World(Mystara) in full color and black & white with the names of the places of note and reasons to go there as well. That system itself is for Low Fantasy Adventuring, but if you are more of the High Fantsy type, there are plenty of Magic Items for you to use in the game to keep the pace going.

There is no reason why you should not Own this book. Owning Modern Editions should not keep you from buying this book, Owning other similar OSR Books should not keep you from buying his book. If you want to play Tabletop but do not want to have 5+ books in your shelf that you might not ever use, buy this One Book. What are you wating for?! Buy it Now. You will not regret it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod
by Dom A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/21/2019 11:06:31

I ran this for a couple of kids (under 10) they played 2 characters each and had a great time! quick to setup and play and a definite gateway to "proper" D&D



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

WGS1 Five Shall Be One (2e)
by Michael P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/21/2019 09:13:13

while it is a module of historical importance (the new metaplot was driven forward), it is with very few exceptions quite mediocre. The highlight is a city infiltration which thankfully gives the players a bit freedom to come up with good ideas. On the negative side, it looks very much like they tried to copy the Dragonlance premade characters in event based adventure thing, which in my opinion does not work at all in that case. In addition the plot, as well as the whole descriptions of the environments could profit from a logic check and a big rewrite.

[Edit] I reread the Orc city part and it is actually quite unique and nice, so maybe 4/5 is justified.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
WGS1 Five Shall Be One (2e)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

AC6 D&D Player Character Record Sheets
by Jessica L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/20/2019 10:07:30

brought to this page when trying to find the class specific bundle. not as expected, glad was just $1. have no use for this



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
AC6 D&D Player Character Record Sheets
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
by Damian H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/19/2019 14:48:19

I grew up with BECM. By the time this Cyclopedia came out all my friends were hyped for AD&D Second Edition. So I never got to use this back in the day.

Nowadays I play solo old school DnD. I got tired of using my ipad and printing out rules to remember. So I ordered this softcover and can reference what I need quicker. It also feels more real than digital stuff.

The printjob is OK- the cover wasn't cut perfectly, and there was at least one smudge inside. It's POD, so I evern smeled the ink. However, it was much better than anything I could print at home. And the price is truly amazing considering you get what is ultimately the Ultimate Old School D&D ruleset and Mystara primer.

Even though the designers of 5E are nice and it remains the #1 RPG tabletop game, there is no question that 5E has overpowered "builds" and values combat and skill checks instead of the intended experience.

PS: I made some (not all) suggested fixes using this: https://www.acaeum.com/library/cyclopedia_errata.pdf If you want to use the old school rules, you might as well make sure they are free from minor errors.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
D&D Rules Cyclopedia (Basic)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

N4 Treasure Hunt (1e)
by Trevor H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/16/2019 21:07:49

Do you want to run a zero level adventure, but dont care to plunk down the bucks to buy DCC? then try this. it is a good adventure that takes the characters from no nothing losers in a slave ship to heros.

it would probably work with DCC if you love the character funnel. NO SPOILERS... but it is a good little ditty that could really sing in the hands of a capable DM. It will run just fine in your joe average DM hands as well.

Looking for a great way to kick of a 2 year D&D campaign? look no further. I kicked off a 3 year campaign with this little bueaty, and we lasted a full 4 months! this is a record for our gaming group. I have system ADD. I blame drivethru.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
N4 Treasure Hunt (1e)
Click to show product description

Add to Little Wars Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 5679 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
Powered by DriveThruRPG