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Rise of the Drow: Collector's Edition
by Ryan T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/02/2020 16:59:47

This beautiful book acts as an adventure, sourcebook, and bestiary (in that order). Throughout the adventure each chapter offers you a list of consequences to the decisions, or lack thereof, that your players make… and the outcomes of possibility of failures. Which I enjoy, as if I’m lucky to run the campaign multiple times each playthroughs will be different. With the amount of lore (and there is a lot of it) and possible sidequests given in this book you can easily make a sandbox adventure out it, of which I'll do, or insert it anywhere into your campaign. There’s also spells in here as well. A fun tome that is welcomed in my collection.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rise of the Drow: Collector's Edition
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Rise of the Drow: Collector's Edition (PF1e)
by simon c. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/02/2020 15:20:19

I got the PDF version right now. It's a wonderful underdark campaign, filled with wondrous (and perilous) locales, characters and factions of all kind. I'm very much tempted to expand on the material presented here, add a duergar city or two, and deep gnomes here and there, but as it is it's already filled with material, more than enough to run a sandboxy underdark campaign. The campaign itself (lvl 1 to 15th, a change in pace and leveling from the previous PF version I believe) is something like 170 pages, the setting in whih it takes place is approximately 163, and the rest of the book (which is is 543 pages total)the massive bestiary, fully illustrated and filled with horrors from below as well as quite the collection of statblocks for our dear drows.

Illustrations are a-plenty, maps are colored, beautiful and evocative...It's quite the treat for a fan of Underdark adventures/settings.

If you wish more in-depths reviews of the work I can only recommend the awesome blog of Endzeitgeist, which was not completely unrelated to my acquiring of this book in the first place...



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rise of the Drow: Collector's Edition (PF1e)
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Rise of the Drow: Collector's Edition (PF1e)
by JEROME M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/29/2020 21:22:39

I heard a lot about Rise of the Drow over the years of playing Pathfinder. I missed the initial releases and the subsequent Pathfinder compilation, so I was thrilled to join the Kickstarter for the Rise of the Drow Collector's Edition. I went in whole-hog for the BIG book, pdfs, dice, maps and even the Underworld Encounters Deck! To date, I have been very pleased with the end result, as the maps, dice, and pawn set are really nice and are of top notch quality. The same could be said for the overall adventure, Rise of the Drow. The original adventure was presented at level six, but the story was later expanded to include a level one introduction. It is worth saying that this adventure probably works best for starting at level three, as the introduction can be quite taxing, to even the most veteran of players. This is a good thing, mind you, as this adventure starts in a way that feels unique and gets the players characters involved on the action from the getgo!

The adventure book is almost 600 pages long and covers a complete bestiary of creatures used in the adventure as well as setting and campaign information about Rybalka and the various nearby dwarven and drow cities, respectively. I'm reading through the adventure and it looks to hit all of the buttons of epic fantasy for those that enjoy such things. As an old school player with a lot of experience dealing with the nefarious drow of old, I jumped at the chance to bring a proper drow invasion into the Pathfinder era. Over the course of this campaign, the experience should run the gamut of what makes long running campaigns great!

I noticed a few minor errors here and there, but nothing major. The pdf is bookmarked for easy reference and the entire book has sidebars throughout. There are constant timelines and reminders alongside page numbers for the creatures or items in each encounter. Honestly, the way this is organized makes it superior to formatting used by Paizo, Kobold Press, and Frog God Games.

I'm still waiting for my final BIG book from the Kickstarter, but I feel, based on the sheer depth of material available to mine for this campaign alongside the way my players are reacting to the game, that this will be considered a classic drow saga not only by our little gaming table, but by many more tables to come! Rise of the Drow is as good as fantasy roleplaying adventures get.

Buy it, today!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
5E Mini-Dungeon #018: Neotomas' Paradise
by Randy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/01/2020 09:45:33

This is the second one I used in my campaign. I worked it into a scenario of helping the mayor find what is happening to the poorest of the citizens. These little dungeons are perfect to augment the DM's story he/she is trying to tell.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
5E Mini-Dungeon #018: Neotomas' Paradise
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5E Mini-Dungeon #002: Hobgoblin Lair
by Randy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/30/2020 05:12:38

Perfect for a low level dungeon to teach new people about the game. I will certainly use others. I added a secret room to this module of my own design at the end. But that was not due to any short comings of this product. It was so King Oberon could invite our ranger to his special troop of Fey Wanderer Rangers. Worked great and saved me lots of time!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
5E Mini-Dungeon #002: Hobgoblin Lair
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Future's Past: Tomorrow's End (5 of 5)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/27/2020 11:01:31

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The finale of the Future‘s Past AP clocks in at 30 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 26 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This module was moved up in my reviewing queue as a prioritized review at the request of m patreon supporters.

…to be frank, not that moving this one up would have really needed coaxing. The module is for 5th level characters, and concludes the Future’s Past AP. This is not a module you can run as a stand-alone offering without losing its impact, which is also why I’ll deviate somewhat from my usual format for reviews, and instead note something important:

The Future’s Past AP, in many ways, is one I’d recommend for experienced GMs, but it is one that also has an intrinsic teaching angle integrated into its structure: The initial two adventures started off in a way that was more conventional and should be easy to run for less experienced GMs; part III and IV progressively built on that, slowly taking away the training wheels and going more and more into freer-form structures that emphasize player agenda above linear presentation of a projected plot. This module, then, is the final exam, the graduation of the GM into a scenario so epic in scope and versatile in its possibilities, anything short of an open presentation would be doomed to failure.

You see, while the structure of the module is very much one of a linear sequence of events, the scale or scales on which these events happen and their precise nature are very much open to the preferences of the respective group playing this adventure. The module does come with read-aloud text. That being said, this module does require preparation; like the remainder of the AP, you cannot run this spontaneously. Frankly, though? I’ve rarely had as much as joy preparing a module as I did with this one. Why? Well, know how the previous modules in the AP sent shivers down my spine?

Guess what? This one genuinely managed to outdo them. The prose is fantastic, and even the non-read-aloud text, in many instances, is quality-wise on a level that outperforms the vast majority of readaloud texts. I am not kidding. And before you ask: This is not a victim of failed-novelist-syndrome; it may sport phenomenal prose, but it’s also very concise, precise. It doesn’t waste words or pages.

Okay, in order to go into more detail, I will need to dive into SPOILERS. Potential players should jump ahead to the conclusion. No seriously. If you spoil this series for yourself, you’ll be missing out on what might be the best adventure saga for SFRPG to date. You’ve been warned.

… .. .

Okay, only GMs around? Take in this introductory text: “Déjà vu implies some uncertainty. This is more like a recurring nightmare coming true. The distant stars twinkle, as if obscured by a thickening sphere of dust, the size of a solar system. Then, the galaxy disappears entirely. Illuminated by the light of dimensional rifts, ships gradually take shape within the cloud. Some seem miles long, dwarfing even Edge Station’s asteroid. While most are smaller… there are so many. Hundreds or thousands of crafts moving in perfect tandem. Each is all sleek, aggressive lines. Like a sword or spear sized to stab a god. You have never seen these ships, and yet you have. They are an old foe, and you have fought them many times. But… they always win, and you always die.“

Central AI is coming with an entire fleet; the PCs have fought and lost this battle an infinite number of times, and thus, the characters benefit from practiced perfection throughout, which is mechanically represented in a variety of ways. The PCs start off with a frickin’ functional time machine (problem solving advice included); it can transfer matter; it can tinker in the past – and yet, there is no chance to win. There simply are not enough people on Edge Station to beat Central. Ever. Only, you know, the PCs can take themselves out of alternate timelines/realities, evening the odds – and it only costs a few hundred-trillion lives as those doomed realities are now reliably lost. Of course, seeing variants of yourself die and die and die over and over again isn’t particularly good for the psyche…

And there are limits: Timetech Gamble pays a hefty, horrible price for the use of the time machine; Butterfly effect tables, and Vincent’s mighty Node as an ace in the whole also are included – but ultimately, the module requires winning against a vast fleet combat, which comes with concise rules for starship fleets and (rules more abstract and simpler than starships, but otherwise capable of making fleets pretty much on the fly, based on starships), but starship-level rules for Edge Station are provided as well; indeed, it is possible to run this potentially sans the fleet combat, but the beauty here is that you can switch from fleet combat to ship combat to personal combat, if you want to – you know, PCs on board a ship fighting nano warrior invaders, representing hundreds of battles like this, taking place all over the fleet, as infinite PC duplicates live and die…

Ultimately, the PCs need to face the Nanochine avatar of Central AI itself; it has killed them 127 times; it can’t fathom how they can still surprise it; it can’t fathom that here, at this one junction in time and space, at this one instant, the all-mighty AI can LOSE. It’s up to the PCs – or their future might well end up a thing of the past…

Conclusion: Editing and formatting, on a formal level, are good – it’s the one thing about this book that I don’t love; it’s good, mind you, but I noticed a few instances of spell-references missing their italics and similar cosmetic glitches. Layout adheres to the series neat two-column full-color standard, and the module comes with great full-color artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, and we get a pretty awesome galaxy map, but no player-friendly version of said map.

I should probably penalize this for its minor hiccups.

I refuse.

Srsly. This conclusion to Future’s Past not only manages to end the AP in a satisfying manner, it actually succeeds in surpassing the previous installments. Yep, you read that right. If you’re an experienced GM, you will read this and balk at the ambition, at the scale. At how smart it is. At how well it covers all those “OMG, I can’t handle that” aspects; this book not only makes a functional time machine work, it expects the party to properly use it. To beat impossible odds that would even be beyond the power of deities. At level 5/6. And IT WORKS.

The streamlined, quick fleet combat suffused with the option for individual encounters of starship combat requires prep-work. This holds true for the entire module. This adventure assumes competence on part of the GM. If you pull it off, your players will laud you forever.

I genuinely can’t believe that this series exists and is complete. Why? Because it is so smart, clever and concise it almost hurts me; each module in this series can outclass adventures of thrice or more pages; the entire campaign is perhaps one of the best scifi/science-fantasy campaigns ever put to paper. At least I’d be hard-pressed to mention anything that comes close. Additionally, it’s a saga that exceeds in ambition and scope what most authors and publishers would even dare to attempt, much less pull off. I still can’t believe that this masterful AP was pulled off not only with a singularly clear vision, but even without using a kickstarter or the like. Within the seemingly few pages of the saga, the extremely concise writing allows GMs to easily spread the content if desired. You could make this module, for example, last one session – or up to 5-6.

Stephen Rowe once more shows why he’s one of the few authors I buy sight unseen. I have the entire AP in softcover, and I’d rather sell some limited edition hardcovers than these modules.

How good is Future’s Past? If you play any non-SFRPG scifi/space opera game, I genuinely believe that this saga is worth converting. Yes, even if you’re not familiar with SFRPG’s complex rules, this series is imho good enough to translate it to Stars Without Number, Traveller, etc.

This right here, this AP? It’s the benchmark for SFRPG-modules, the level that needs to be beaten. In fact, I consider Future’s Past to be so far beyond most modules, it almost feels unfair to put them in the same category.

5 stars. Seal of approval. Top Ten Candidate. EZG Essential. If you even remotely like the concept, please buy this series.

Future’s Past is one of these outstanding sagas that should grace the shelves of any GM. This should be considered to be a rite of passage level adventure for the genre.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Future's Past: Tomorrow's End (5 of 5)
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Rise of the Drow: Collector's Edition
by Michael H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/21/2020 17:03:29

Unfortunately this campaign is not well written for 5e, rambles with excessive narration and while the cover and much of the artwork is stunning, it neither provides sufficient matterial for a full campaign nor is organized in a manner to allow ease of use at the table. The connection betweens feels forced and jerky at times, resulting in the need for me to expand on the story arc thus smoothing the rough connections.

Add to that the fact that their pdf prevents copy and paste for use in online gaming tools the publication is almost unsuable by me, especially during the current situation associated with COVID. I full support protecting the IP of a company, but come on, I should be able to snip bits and pieces out of the pdf I purchased for use in my personal games. If someone is planning to pirate the material they will simply take scans or screen shots of the pages and post those on sharing websites. Making a product more difficult to use for the consumers that actually purchase the material, only encourages more pirating. I for one will not be paying for another campaign book from AAW, unless they become more supportive of the consumers that support their company.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Rise of the Drow: Collector's Edition
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Earl Grey, Hot
by Ron L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/18/2020 19:24:17

I ran "Earl Grey, Hot" for my kids today and we had a great time playing it. I'm fairly new to Starfinder but have been playing RPGs since I was 14 years old... so for thirty-mumble years. We loved the variety of play, from swashbuckling ship boarding to planetary jungle tromps to ship battles. The adventure gave us a real overview of many rules we hadn't yet explored. I was delighted that the publisher quickly answered a question I had about the product. The appendices gave a great deal of depth about the Frentellis system which is a nice backdrop for further adventures. The only missing item seemed to be a write up of the Pruo race which is apparently an aquatic race that inhabits Fretellis 4. We are quite curious about them as a race and how spacefaring works for them and would love to see them as a playable race. (We're thinking Abe Sapien of Hellboy fame!). This is a great adventure, with lots of extras... I mean there's a whole star system included and Clarkson star beasts! Thanks for the fun. Oh and we just love anagrams. :-)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Earl Grey, Hot
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Future's Past: Infinity Incursion (4 of 5)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/26/2020 05:18:00

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The fourth part of the Future’s Past AP clocks in at 26 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 21 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

As before with the series, please do not be fooled by the page-count – there is more (and better) gaming in Future’s Past installments than in many books of more than thrice that size. Edge station’s map is included in a player-friendly, full-color map. This module needs to be played as a sequel to part III of the AP, due to the unique nature of this series; unlike many APs, this really doesn’t work as a stand-alone module. That being said, no other AP has genuinely made me feel shudders running down my spine from excitement as often as this one has so far, so let’s see if part IV can maintain this ridiculously high standard.

Please do note that, in my review of this adventure, I necessarily have to use SPOILERS, some of which pertain to previous installments of the series. I STRONGLY suggest that, if you’re a Starfinder-player (or one for another rules-system who loves intelligent stories!), you skip ahead to the conclusion.

Again, this is the huge SPOILER-warning. You have been warned!

… .. .

Only GMs around? Great! Central has won. The AI is a deity that transcends timelines, a perfect overlord, a thing that has broken free will and society throughout most of the cosmos. Some survivors and resistances still struggle with the Druune to beat it – but ultimately, it’s not enough. Time and time again, the time-travelers lose to Central in infinite iterations. Throughout infinite timelines, there was but a single instance where the unbeatable machine god lost, was reduced to base improvisation. Edge Station.

The PCs are trapped on Edge Station in a time loop, still occupying the possessed bodies of scientists and soldiers; they know Central comes to destroy them, as it has for countless times; at the end of First Contact, a strange message arrives from Queen Deshekh, a cybernetic formian – a change in the loop.

According to historical records, Edge Station blew up due to a freak malfunction in the fusion reactor; the Druune could not understand Central AI and how important Edge Station was to it – and thus, the 4 time travelers that arrive pursue desperate and wide-ranging plans. All of these plans are doomed to fail without the PCs. They are, though, a perfect example of fantastic NPC-writing. All of the NPCs come btw. with their own original full-color artworks of absolutely superb quality.

So, let’s talk about the NPCs: Queen Deshekh is no queen. To quote her text: “Central considered the elimination of the formian species the model of efficiency.” Central eliminated all queens simultaneously, which pretty much drove the entire species insane; Deshekh then transformed some of her dead hive-brethren into cybernetic zombies, to help keep her sane in the absence of her species’ telepathic chattering. Since then, her ailing body becomes more and more like a cyber-zombie herself. Deshekh is supposed to take control of the security systems and analyze any traps or tricks left by Central – she also is desperate to warn her people, seeking to boost her cybernetics to issue a warning scream. She is not aware of Central’s in-bound fleet, and spread too thin.

Vincent Sharsone was a programming prodigy working on Central – and he realized its danger…but when he did, it was too late. Central wrecked his life, and in the future, none of the nodes can truly be accessed – so it’s here that Vincent acts. He wants to overwrite a node with a copy of his mind, which will destroy his brain, but it might create an AI that can potentially go toe to toe with Central.

Oroseen the changer is a mystic of maraquoi stock, bonded symbiotically with the Druune, made a changer, a being capable of switching between the species’ numerous sexes. Oroseen is torn between the host and Druune personality, and seeks to share knowledge with the Druune by mind linking with the dimensional gates. Sure, this’ll cause worsening rift flares, but well…

Finally, there is Timetech Gamble, the fellow on the cover (and yes: cover-art quality = interior art quality!) – you see, when Central took control it was the space goblins that kept the Federation alive – and who managed to perfect time travel! Gamble is the sole traveler who has no ulterior motive: The space goblin prodigy lady has one task: Build a time-machine. In only a day or two.

This is also a GREAT point to note that the module explains not only the time travel employed by Central, but also this distinctly…goblin-like approach of timetechs to time travel. Okay, so far for the cast of illustrious characters – now, let’s talk about the rules!

You see, the PCs had infinite iterations atop Edge Station – they are adjusted to their bodies, and each PC has a FLAWLESS understanding of every nook and cranny of Edge Station. This includes being able to maneuver through it blindly with only very minor penalties. The PCs also know where to gain equipment. The module takes place, structurally, in 4 steps, and after each step, the PC can gain equipment of an item level of 4 or less; 5 or 6 item level takes 2 such encounters, and item level 7 takes until all are completed. The PCs also know perfectly how the other people aboard Edge Station tick, which gives them a huge edge (haha) in social interactions. From computer familiarity to researched topics, etc. In short: The PCs get to be the blasé loopers that know all the stuff, which can be a fantastic roleplaying experience. Best of all: They will NEED this type edge. None of the time travelers are per se necessarily cooperative, and after encountering one, the timeline progresses in 4 steps – without help, the individuals will greatly worsen the situation: From hostile security systems to failing life support and rift radiation flares, PCs will have a HARD time dealing with these fellows…which is why the extensive troubleshooting provided is super helpful!

Did your PCs manage to eliminate the node? Module accounts for that. Do they split the party? The module actually encourages that, and while tough, it is a valid scenario! Successfully aiding the time travelers will bring serious boons to the PCs, like a functional node, and they’ll need them in the finale!

You see, Central never had to excessively use time travel, as a single projection was already the definition of overkill. Lacking the curiosity of organic life, it never tested time travel’s limitations, and the copying of consciousnesses is not an error-free process – and an AI suffers from such errors compounding…and there is a small, but non-zero chance that projections into this time might cause catastrophic malfunctions. Such a risk is unacceptable; plans would need to be altered, perhaps for the first time. The God-AI is vulnerable – perhaps for the first and last time. All that now remains, is to triumph against impossible odds.

BAM, and that is how you tease an AP-finale! I paraphrased it, but boy, the writing. It’s just so AWESOME.

Conclusion: Editing is very good on a rules-language level; on a formal level, I noticed a few minor typos and a couple of formatting snafus, such as missed italics for spell-references, a “P” missing from[Progression] and the like – but nothing that would have impeded the functionality of the module. Thomas Baumbach’s 2-column layout for the series is perfect and feels appropriate, and makes information easy to parse. The full-color original artworks by Leonard O’Grady are top-tier and frickin’ GORGEOUS – the interior art in on par with the cover! Cartography is full-color as well, and player-friendly maps are included. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. I own the softcover version, because, frankly, if you even remotely like Starfinder or any roleplaying game in space, then you owe to yourself to get this.

Stephen Rowe is ridiculously talented; not just as a designer, but also as a writer. The Future’s Past AP began strong, and has since only ramped up the tension, the stakes. I have never before seen either time travel, or dealing with a godlike adversary, done so intelligently, so well.

After part II, I was waiting with baited breath, hoping that the AP would live up to my, at this point, ridiculously high expectations, that it would manage to retain its internal logic, its persistent class. Well, part III exceeded my expectations, throwing a HUGE curve-ball of jamais-vu and awesomeness at the players and GM, and part IV further builds on this, once more delivering something you haven’t ever played in a module before.

Future’s Past’s fourth installment stands alongside its predecessors as a singularly-compelling, phenomenal achievement of adventure-writing, and if the finale doesn’t drop the ball big time, this will enter my roleplaying game collection as one of the singularly best adventure-series I own. If you have been hesitant so far, stop reading and get this series now. If you wanted your scifi/science-fantasy to be intelligent, high-stakes and awesome, if you want to experience something new at the table – Future’s Past delivers. I consider this series to be good enough to warrant converting to Traveller, Stars Without Numbers, Mothership, or similar games. It’s that good.

The fourth part gets 5 stars + my seal of approval, and, like ALL three installments before it, gets the nomination for my Top Ten, here of 2019. If Part V holds up, this series will be a hot contender for my number 1 spot.

See you at Tomorrow’s End, the furious finale!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Future's Past: Infinity Incursion (4 of 5)
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BASIC01: A Learning Time
by Sean H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/17/2020 02:33:50

A simple, yet outstanding introduction to tabletop games! I've used this as a jumping point for a longer campaign with my regular party, and the light hearted energy keeps things jovial and adventurous- exactly how DND should be.

Have fun'



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
BASIC01: A Learning Time
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Future's Past: First Contact (3 of 5)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/28/2019 08:52:36

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The third installment of the Future’s Past AP clocks in at 23 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 18 pages of content. It should be noted that, as in the first two installments, the module has more content inside than the page-count would lead you to believe.

This module is intended for 4-6 3rd level characters, and I highly recommend playing Future’s Past I and II – they are both phenomenal adventures.

Okay, so HUGE WARNING: In order to discuss this review, I will need to go into SPOILERS not only for the module, but also for its predecessors. If you want to play this (and you do, trust me!), then you should stop reading RIGHT NOW.

SERIOUS SPOILER WARNING! Players, skip to the conclusion.

… .. .

All right, so this is thematically a WTF-moment; after the dark fantasy/horror/System Shock-esque first two adventures, this is where the series kicks into conceptual ultra-high-gear: The PCs, at this point, probably realize that the Druune are dangerous, alien and downright strange, and they have realized that Central AI is an issue. The druune realize the threat of Central AI reaching a kind of dues ex machina super-singularity. The PCs have hijacked the experimental druune prototype time machine, and send their minds back to the eponymous First Contact with the druune. To avoid issues with the time-stream, the PC’s minds are what’s sent back into time – and as such, the module begins with a surprisingly mighty possession-engine of sorts: The blending of memories means that the PCs get to choose one or two options from various lists: Military officers could get a theme knowledge, 6 + Int skills among physical skills, or a bonus feat – those taking two benefits have a harder time accessing the host body’s memories. That is…fantastic. A talented GM can use this framework to potentially expand upon it and even use it to run an entire campaign of ghosts in living shells. Oh, and yes, this does address balance concerns, explains how e.g. mechanic tools interact with that, and there is an option for players to play a new character of sorts due to a glitch in the process.

The GM then proceeds to generate 1-2 characters per PC, which are tied to the host of the PC’s psyche. These are categorized in groups, and from lovers to enemies to those infected by the druune, can add lots of complications for them. Whether you need stats for them or not depends on your playstyle – flavor-only might well suffice.

Most personnel on board of the station is either a scientist or military – oh, and the players get to meet the key players of the station, who come with GORGEOUS mugshots and flavor-centric write-ups. And no, these artworks are not the only ones of this quality herein. Indeed, from characters to location, edge station is a stark contrast to the horrible timeline from which the PCs hail, with future memories intruding, reminding the players and characters alike of the horrid fates to come.

The PCs arrive at Edge Station at 13:00. The timeline of events has happened, to a degree, an innumerable number of times. It is up to the PCs to change them. Culture helps recall them, and points flux – options to [delay] and [avert] key steps on the way to First Contact – and the ultimate goal is to prevent it…which isn’t too easy, considering the smart tactics of the adversary. Oh, and the module has seriously amazing advice on how to troubleshoot the adventure, if required – the players do have a chance to engage in a limited groundhog day, but one that might require the players to engage in a loop, at least if you are as strict as I am. I LOVE this.

This module, in short, is about PLAYER SKILL.

Almost exclusively, dauntingly so. I LOVE IT. Yes, dice will be rolled – this is Starfinder, after all! Yes, there is a villain to be thwarted in combat. But know what? This module can only be solved by being CLEVER and by roleplaying well.

And no, I am not giving away the finale, how this module ends. Why? Because preventing First Contact shall not suffice to stop Central. And because the final paragraphs of this adventure sent bonafide shivers of excitement down my spine!

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are good on a formal level, excellent on a rules-language level. There is one header not closed (missing [/h2]), and I noticed a few references to spells in purely descriptive text not italicized correctly. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the pdf comes with A LOT of full-color, high-quality artwork on par with cover, NPC mugshots, etc. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, but personally, I’d suggest getting the entire AP in print. It’s worth having on your shelf.

Stephen Rowe’s Future’s Past AP had two phenomenal modules so far; First Contact, while formally slightly less refined, imho mops the floor with even those. If you are a rules-savvy SFRPG-GM, then the possession-engine can open entire new campaign concepts for you. And if you’re not, you actually get an INTELLIGENT time-travel scenario that makes sense, that helps you troubleshoot if required, and that focuses boldly on the abilities of your players. This is all about roleplaying, and from the Groundhog-Day-potential to the stakes, this is a legendary adventure indeed. This module gets 5 stars, seal of approval, and is a candidate for my Top Ten of 2019. Future’s Past, so far, has been a truly epic achievement.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Future's Past: First Contact (3 of 5)
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Future's Past: Edge Station (1 of 5)
by Callum M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/12/2019 14:25:29

I don't often write reviews, but there were criminally few for this amazing product.

I was hesitant about buying this while searching for quirky and interesting third-party Starfinder compatible modules, despite Endzeitgeist's review and some recommendations online, because of the lack of information about it and the fact the other three modules in the series haven't been reviewed. I can honestly say it was well worth it, and on the strength of this first module I immediately purchased the other three currently available and am eagerly awaiting the release of the fifth. My recommendation here is for the entire campaign as a whole (so far anyway, the last episode hasn't been released), see Endzeitgeist's review for more specifics on this particular installment.

Non-spoilery recommendation: While it starts as a pure body horror adventure in this module, the later episodes open up into other rarely (satisfyingly) explored sci-themes. And it does them incredibly well.

That's it for non-spoilers, if there's any chance you'll ever play in this campaign you'll hate yourself and me if you read further.

... still here?

This campaign features time travel done superbly well, as the centrepiece of an epic space opera campaign. A great deal of thought has clearly been put into time travel as the primary underlying mechanic of the campaign, it's not just a gimmick. As an example, the first four modules (designed to take your players from levels 1-5) take place entirely on the same space station. And you most certainly will not get anyone complaining about repetitive gameplay. The early horror themes are almost a bait and switch for later modules that tone down the shock horror for more cerebral and social puzzles (how do you avert the disaster that left the station in the horrific circumstances you first found it in?! is somebody on the station aware you're trying to prevent the disaster and acting against you?! how is that even possible?!) with hints that the final module might have overtones of Mass Effect or Star Trek as you finally find a way to strike back at the overwhelming foe that's been acting behind the scenes.

The first two modules are very heavy on body horror, which might prove too steep an entry price for some groups without heavy modification - but the overall pathway as outlined is an incredible read. Any suitably machiavelian DM is going to be rubbing their hands together in glee when they consider how their players will be feeling experiencing the twists and turns of the campaign as they painstakingly piece together theories of what's happening, only to have them dashed upon the rocks of reality again and again.

And the production values are easily comparable with Paizo Starfinder products, with obvious affection for Starfinder lore and incredible art to boot (despite not being set in the official canon Starfinder universe it takes its queues from it and can easily be fitted into a canon starfinder universe by just replacing the Galactic Coalition with the Pact Worlds or a Pact Worlds/Veskarium Alliance)! Nuar administrators, Space-Goblin junk-savants, Maraquoi symbiotes, Formian techno-zombie-hives, so many great ideas throughout the campaign. Well worth your time and money.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Future's Past: Edge Station (1 of 5)
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Rise of the Drow Prologue: The Darkness Arrives
by Iain T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/28/2019 09:14:02

I ran this as a prelude to Rise of the Drow and I thought it worked pretty well. Our group was only three players and I handled this by putting them on the fast XP pathway. The setting is linear enough to be manageable but flexible enough to allow for player choices to take them in unexpected directions. Problems I met were that mage items were scarce and the plotline is just a little uncertain at times. Nothing to sweat about. We went on to Rise of the Drow and all players were level 6



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Rise of the Drow Prologue: The Darkness Arrives
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Mini-Dungeon Tome (Pathfinder RPG)
by Weller W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/08/2019 15:38:55

Awesome Content, Great tools, well put together. Keep up the great work !



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mini-Dungeon Tome (Pathfinder RPG)
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5E Mini-Dungeon #038: The Spinner's Hole
by Ralph K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/19/2019 14:24:52

A short and simple dungeon with an interesting challenge for the players that you can run with minimal GM preparation.

My full review can be found at https://rpgames.be/mini-dungeon-38-the-spinners-hole-review/



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
5E Mini-Dungeon #038: The Spinner's Hole
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