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The Curse of Cragbridge - DCC RPG
by Alex P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/17/2016 18:30:57

I had the fortunate experience of play testing Curse of Cragbridge last year, and in short, it was a blast. I am glad that this adventure is now available for purchase… and typical of Paul Wolfe’s previous adventures, Curse of Cragbridge does not disappoint.

Curse of Crabridge is a level 0-2 adventure and contains 40 pages of pure DCC goodness! Great art, memorable locations, new spell, random tables and memorable NPCs. The entire adventure should take 2-4 sessions to run, and can be incorporated into a larger campaign with little effort. The art does a good job conveying the feel of the adventure and the random tables can be repurposed for other DCC adventures.

DCC has been my go-to system for the past year and what I really like is the high quality of third party publishers adventures, e-zines and art work. This adventure hits all the sweet spots for me!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Curse of Cragbridge - DCC RPG
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Galaxy War 1939 - Legacy of the Oros
by Ryan M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/20/2015 13:05:39

Galaxy War 1939 is a retro sci-fi setting for the White Star RPG. Set in the WWII era, Galaxy War supposes that the war has spread into space using Flash Gordon 50's style future tech. The setting places the characters in the role of Space Operations Executive (SOE) agents fighting a shadow war against the Nazis (in space!)

The setting pushes all the right buttons for me. I love retro-sci. One of my favorite graphic novels is Ignition City by Warren Ellis and I love the old Dan Dare comics. British and Nazi rocket-ships dog-fighting over Mars really fires up the imagination.

In the adventure the PCs travel to a former British colony world now under control of the Reich. There they must rescue a scientist trapped on the planet. The adventure is cool, for though all the great source material in the book is the real treasure. There are stats for tons of new alien creatures, Nazi spacecraft and tanks, and a spaceship for the players to use. There's even details on some new psychic abilities.

The art in this book is fantastic. The images of the Nazi stormtroopers or Raketekommandos and the WW II era spacecraft capture the retro sci-fi feel perfectly. There's even a short multi-panel comic that I'm dying to read the rest of. If you like retro sci-fi, I highly recommend this adventure.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Galaxy War 1939 - Legacy of the Oros
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In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer
by Daniel S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/27/2014 17:48:32

[Originally found on www.whatwouldconando.blogspot.com] In the Prison of the Squid Sorceror is the kind of book I like: full of bits and things. Twelve of them to be exact, as per the front cover. Each is a weird adventure of varying length written in the spirit of Michael Moorcock.

Firstly I'll get what I don't like out of the way: italicised read-aloud text. Horrible, ick, I hate the stuff. At best it makes the GM sound like he's reading off the back of a menu, at worst he turns into a primary school teacher enthusiastically telling the children a story with all the blood-soaked, night-falling, flame-flickering clichés you can handle. What's more it makes it hard to gather up information for processing into something more natural. If details are hidden in a block of prose you're likely to miss them.

The best bits are the small encounters that could be used pretty much anywhere with no planning. The Cult of the Flickering Sign is the best of the little ones, in my estimation; the party stumbles upon a grisly murder in an alleyway with typical oogly cult signs on it and quickly end up rumbling the bad folks and having a wonderful time. I'd love a book full of these little vignette adventures, as they always get to the point without any padding and are easily disassembled for the juicy bits.

Let's talk about Moorcock: we know that he often worked on a tight schedule, so much so that he would sometimes just throw out a bunch of weird stuff, drag Elric through it and call it a night. Some of the adventures (the eponymous scenario being one of them) felt a lot like that, with strange stuff dropping in and weirding up the place without warning with the aim of entertaining a herd of murder hobos. As with Moorcock, you'll either like it or be put off. Make of it what you will, but I'm happy with to deal with some dodgy verisimilitude occasionally. Besides, we're smart GMs, season to taste.

Considered as a whole, In the Prison of the Squid Sorceror is a solid and sometimes inspired bunch of adventures that I'll be pillaging in the near future.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer
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Pulp Weird Encounters #1: The Tomb of Squonk and the Silent Army
by Noah S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/01/2013 10:50:05

In "The Tomb of the Squonk", the foolhardy adventurers would probably suffer a TPK either at the hands of the Squonk himself or in their efforts to assist him. I think it would be a good evening's one-off game and maybe even a mixed funnel/regular party adventure, in that it seems very likely to me that players not conversant in the old ways would suffer many many casualties. It has a couple of good tie-ins to multiplanar adventures and even a useful long-standing enemy/patron concept.

The Silent Army poses some excellent ethical dilemmas at the outset, and is fairly straightforward after that. The antagonist would probably make short work of a low-level party but the difficulty could be moderated by adjusting stats down or up, and its power for assimilation could be used for much consternation among players who are attached to characters.

I would love to play these as a DM, gleefully cackling and whisking players into the hearts of a sun or implanting nanobot coated spikes into brains. For my part, I would even enjoy having a couple of characters die this way. That said, I happen to play with folks who do get attached to characters, who would probably sulk about a few rooms with little loot very deadly traps. I might add I don't think players like this ought to play DCC owing to its bent for lethality.

They're both short, linear, and suitably weird and pulpy in that they involve extra-dimensional or extraplanetary adversaries, and likely a lot of fun to play of an evening. I am going to introduce the Patricians into my own campaign, probably, just to mix things up and make for some weird unexpected Appendix N stuff. Actually, these kinds of strange and varied adventurers are exactly what DCC is good for and they make a good match.

Might be a hard sell for players coming from, say, D&D 3.5 or pathfinder or something but they'll learn a new way, eventually.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Pulp Weird Encounters #1: The Tomb of Squonk and the Silent Army
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In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer
by erik f. t. t. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/19/2013 16:50:21

(this review originally appeared on tenkarstavern.com)

It's been a bit since I've reviewed something for the DCC RPG. At the moment I'm not running any DCC RPG sessions, but that's more from lack of available time than any lack of desire - the DCC RPG is an awesome game to run and is fun as hell. I need to find time to squeeze a session in as a player myself at some point ;)

Now, just because I'm not running any DCC RPG stuff at the moment doesn't mean I can't get good mileage out of In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer. I may just use this in my Swords & Wizardry Campaign that's just starting up.

You see, it's a prefect fit for a group that is limited to 2 to 3 hrs play (including requisite bullshitting time) at a clip.

In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer is full of mini adventures or in some cases, more like extended encounters. Twelve of them to be exact and suitable for various levels of play although about half are in the third to fifth level range, a range under-represented in the assortment of adventures that are currently released.

Heck, these are also useful to help pace the campaign you are running, as they add bits of side spice to whatever storyline you are currently running.

The adventures are by various authors, but I'm always partial to Daniel Bishop's work on the DCC RPG, and he doesn't disappoint. Actually, I think he has the largest piece running at 8 pages (and a second piece that runs 4 pages in length). These are the prefect sized adventures to run in a single session via G+ Hangouts or the like.

I really love the isometric maps that are the hallmark fo the DCC RPG, and In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer is no exception. They aren't as flashy as the ones by Goodman Games, but I'd still gladly takes some of these as prints. Why doesn't anyone ever listen to me? ;)

Now I just need to figure out which one I should be converting to Crypts & Things first...



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer
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In the Prison of the Squid Sorcerer
by sean c. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/12/2013 14:18:46

Effectively this product is a collection of short stories dripping in appendix N gold. It came along at just the right time for me as I am looking for more shorter stories that I can use on line and in conventions and this is just perfect for that. Don't get me wrong many could be expanded very easily all the hard work has been done for you. The best way to describe this collection is a brilliant bag of your favourite sweets. There is something here for everyone. Not everything was to my taste however there are so many good bits that you can't help forgive any minor nit picks and that's why I gave it a perfect 5***** Well done Mystic Bull!!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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