Bards and Sages RPG Resource
DriveThruComics
DriveThruFiction
Powered by DriveThruRPG


Home » Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd. » The One Ring - Ruins of the North » Reviews
Browse Categories













Back
The One Ring - Ruins of the North $39.99 $22.99
Average Rating:4.8 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
11 6
2 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Click to view
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by A customer [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/07/2018 01:04:24

Overall, this is a pretty good scenario pack-- there are a few spots within it that really bug me though, and thus I cannot give it five stars. Right off the top, there's a situation early in the first of 6 adventures (mentioned in my discussion post) that as written will completely derail the adventure and incur a truly unreasonable amount of shadow points for a "misdeed" that really isn't that much of a misdeed. There's a couple of other little spots in there that similarly provoke a "what were the writers thinking?", especially in the fifth scenario as well... if the book didn't include those problem issues and clear signs of the railroad tracks you're supposed to drive the players down, it would be a clear 5 stars.

Nice effort-- but some consistency and not overly penalizing people for deeds which are in fact, rather reasonable even for heroes to commit under the circumstances, would be nice. This is 'One Ring', not 'Call of Cthulhu'... falling to the shadow in TOR shouldn't be as inevitable as losing your SAN facing the Great Old Ones....



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 03/10/2016 08:49:30

This is a collection of six ready-to-run adventures which you can use whenever your company is in eastern Eriador. They can be stand-alone or linked into a loose series as best suits your needs, and are assumed to take place sometime after 2954 - but not wedded to that date, if your requirements are different. If you have the supplement Rivendell, there's lots of useful material there to help you flesh out locations and the general environment.

The first adventure takes the party from the foothills of Gundabad across the Misty Mountains to the former capital city of Angmar and finally to Rivendell itself. The following five adventures are all based out of Rivendell and are set in the various lands surrounding the Vale of Imladris. They gradually get harder, the first five can be undertaken relatively easily, but the final one presents a greater challenge - although none are appropriate for complete novices, play a few other adventures first. Several suggestions are provided for how you can incorporate these adventures into an ongoing campaign or build a campaign around them, even though there is no definite 'plot arc' (or Big Bad to defeat) save the growing of the Shadows, the gathering of evil, in preparation for the War of the Ring that is to come.

In the first adventure, Nightmares of Angmar, some children have been kidnapped by goblins and it falls to the company to track them down and get them back. It's an autumnal quest, suitable for the last adventure of a year. However, you might want to make up your own reason for them being in the Black Hills (where it all begins) in the first place, most of the reasons provided are rather weak. On the other hand there's an impressive array of options to help you weave this adventure into whatever else is going on. Throughout the adventure, support is provided to help you run each encounter and event... although there is little lee-way for handling anyone who doesn't do the expected thing! There is an interesting mechanic of 'Key Points' - places where the characters' actions or words have a positive or negative effect on a certain pivotal NPC. These will determine how that individual acts in the future, but ought not to be revealed to the players, it's just something that the Loremaster should track.

The next adventure, Harder than Stone, is designed for spring, perhaps after the Fellowship Phase following Nightmares of Angmar. It's undertaken at the behest of Elrond of Rivendell which will lead the company a merry dance along the mighty river Hoarwell. A caravan of dwarves has been attacked... and the characters will have to travel deep into the Trollshaws to find out who's behind it all. Yes, these adventures are full of lots of travelling... but as that's central to all the Tolkein stories, that's not very surprising!

This is followed by Concerning Archers, a spring or summer adventure that begins in Rivendell when Bilbo Baggins gets into an argument with a scholar over hobbit participation in a battle - and asks the company to travel to the ruins of Fornost, the city of the Kings, to check things out. Bilbo reckons that a company of hobbit archers were involved in the fall of Fornost, but the elf to whom he is speaking has been dismissive of such a possibility... and they've made a wager about it. Bilbo needs evidence to win! (Why Bilbo, who's described as being in his prime, won't go himself isn't even discussed, you might want to think of something should your players bring it up.)

The fourth adventure is The Company of the Wain and is interesting in that it's quite episodic - you could interleave events from it with other adventures to good effect as it revolves around a group of travelling traders. Perhaps the company just keeps encountering them as they go about other business. Travelling traders are an unusual sight up here, and there's something a bit odd about this lot...

Next comes What Lies Beneath, which comes with a warning that travelling is even more extensive in this adventure than in most, so it's best started early in a year. Hiraval, a Ranger of the North, wants some assistance to reclaim his family's ancient mansion - not just because he thinks it could improve the safety of the region, but also because he is being haunted by an ancestor who is driving him nuts about the place!

Finally, Shadows Over Tyrn Gorthad has Gandalf asking the company to deal with a veritable plague of barrow-wights who are passing far beyond the Barrow-downs and growing bolder all the time. It will take several Adventuring Phases, indeed several years, to play out in full and the danger is immense. They will need to research and study lore about the barrow-wights before thay are in a position to deal with them, and even researching them carries its dangers.

Overall, a fine collection of adventures that are very true to the whole feel of the setting. There's a tendency to assume that the characters will follow the set path through each adventure, and little support if they do not, but provided they do the right things the Loremaster is well supported to run their adventures. Complete these, and there will be songs written about the company, stuff of legends!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Roger (. L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/27/2015 03:16:06

http://wp.me/p1Hoys-5ii

Wenn es um die Release-Frequenz geht, ist The One Ring sicher eine der gemächlicheren Produktreihen, und das ist sehr schade: Auch mit Ruins of the North beweisen deren Macher, dass sie immer wieder qualitativ Hochwertiges liefern. Im Schatten Angmars und Rivendells schickt diese Abenteuerreihe Spielergruppen durch die weite Wildnis Eriadors.

Rezension: Spuk und Trug in Eriador – Ruins of the North (The One Ring)

Ich muss es gleich im Vorfeld sagen: Ruins of the North ist so gut, dass man danach enttäuscht sein muss! Enttäuscht, weil es der Verlag nicht schafft, mehr solcher Glanzstücke herauszubringen. Zu Beginn gab es mit Tales of Wilderland, The Heart of the Wild und The Darkening of Mirkwood ein Dreierpack, das sich gewaschen hatte: Abenteuersammlung, Settingband und Großkampagne hielten reichlich Material für Spielgruppen parat.

Dass sich die Strategie geändert hat, kann man an Rivendell und Ruins of the North sehen: Zwar sind die beiden Bände genauso wie The Heart of the Wild und The Darkening of Mirkwood aneinander gekoppelt. Aber es folgt eben kein Kampagnenband. Die Ankündigungen für die Zukunft der Reihe sind ähnlich: Horse-lords of Rohan und Oaths of the Riddermark werden der Settingband und die Abenteuersammlung für jene Region sein.

Sollten die Autoren also unter der Rubrik Überraschendes nicht doch noch mehr Spielstoff aus dem Hut zaubern, wird auch 2015 ein zähes Jahr für Veröffentlichungen zum Spiel The One Ring. Mit dem Doppelpack Rivendell und Ruins of the North können sich erfahrene Gruppen aber trotzdem noch etwas vertrösten, und das auf hohem Niveau!

Inhalt Ruins of the North ist ein Abenteuerband mit einer hervorragenden Mischung, wenn auch der Name ein wenig falsche Erwartungen weckt. Detaillierte Beschreibungen von Ruinen wie zum Beispiel in MERS wird man hier vergebens suchen. Die meisten beschriebenen Orte haben höchstens eine kleine bis mittlere Dungeon-Karte beigefügt. Die größeren verfallenen Stätten, die sie umgeben, bleiben allenfalls grob umrissen. Natürlich führen die Wege der Helden auch durch die namensgebenden Ruinen, aber The One Ring verwandelt sich gewiss nicht in einen Dungeon Crawl.

Nightmares of Angmar Das erste Abenteuer beginnt die Sammlung mit einem Knall. Kinder wurden von den Schergen des Schattens entführt, und es ist an der Gruppe, sie zu finden. Die Reise führt von Wilderland über Bergpässe und im Schatten von Mount Gundabad direkt in das dunkle Herz des verlorenen Königreichs Angmar. Doch das wahrhaft Finstere ist der Beginn – die Spieler begegnen einem Stamm verstoßener Menschen, die einst mit Sauron paktierten. Diese leben nun in einer entlegenen Berggegend, und die Folgen jahrhundertelanger Inzucht sind grausig detailliert. Das Abenteuer selbst siedelt sich damit auf der Trennlinie zwischen Licht und Schatten an, und den Spielern ist es überlassen, das Schicksal dieses Stammes zurück zu den Freien Völkern oder weiter in die Verdammnis zu lenken.

Über das Abenteuer hinweg verfolgt der SL die Aktionen der Spieler mit. Nur wer mit Eigeninitiative und aufrechten Taten Respekt erringt, wird wirklich einen Unterschied machen können. Trotz dieser moralischen Komponente enthält das Abenteuer auch knackige Kämpfe und den umfangreichsten Dungeon im Band. Den Haupt-NSC aus dem Rivendell-Band begegnet man in Angmar jedenfalls nicht, sonst wäre es mit dem Überleben schnell vorbei. Man kann mit diesem Abenteuer eine erfahrene Gruppe aus den Gefilden des Hobbits jedenfalls gut nach Eriador übersiedeln, und ihnen eventuell auch gleich eine Operationsbasis in Elronds Heimstatt verpassen.

Harder Than Stone Die Geschichte des zweiten Abenteuers ist viel schneller erzählt: Ein Kapitän Mordors versucht, aus den Trollen der Trollshaws und Ettendales eine Armee für Sauron zu formen. Durch den Überfall auf eine Zwergenkarawane kommen die Spieler auf die Spur dieses Ogers und folgen ihm bis zu einer Art Werbeveranstaltung. Schaffen sie es, sich einzuschleichen, Informationen zu sammeln und erfolgreich zu entkommen, ist die Mission auch schon erfüllt.

Es wäre aber allzu geradlinig, würde es hier nicht eine Verwicklung geben. Die zentrale Ruine dieses Abenteuers ist ein altes Fort der Menschen des Westens. Unter ihr sollen Goblins neue Tunnel durch die Misty Mountains anlegen und haben dabei eine uralte Kammer entdeckt. Hier war ein Geist verborgen, der einst in die Dienste Saurons gezwungen wurde. Können die Spieler zusätzlich das Leiden dieser Kreatur beenden und damit den Schatten eines Dieners berauben?

Concerning Archers Es gibt Geschichten, die sind nur für echte Tolkienfans geeignet, und würden so wohl kaum in anderen Systemen ausgespielt. Die Kameraden treffen in Rivendell Bilbo Baggins, der mit einem Elfenhistoriker darüber streitet, ob Hobbit-Bogenschützen bei der Verteidigung Fornost Erains mitgekämpft haben oder nicht. Der umtriebige Hobbit wird versuchen, die Gruppe dazu zu bewegen, in dieser Ruine mal nachzusehen. Ein solcher Zwiestreit mag in Mittelerde Sinn machen, wo die Völker auch um ihr Andenken ringen. Damit aber die Spieler nicht das Gefühl kriegen, sich für eine Kleinigkeit in Gefahr zu begeben, legt Glorfindel noch eine Schippe drauf und engagiert die Gruppe als Kundschafter, um Aktivitäten des Feindes in der Gegend zu sondieren.

Beim Durchforsten der alten Königsstadt trifft man auf eine Raubgrabung unter Leitung eines diebischen Zwergs, auf eine Orkhorde, böse Geister und die unerlösten Hobbitschützen, die dort noch immer spuken. Eher geradlinig lassen sich so alle Missionsziele erfüllen. Im Untergrund hätte auch eine Karte nicht geschadet, man kann ihr Fehlen aber verschmerzen.

The Company of the Wain Völlig ruinenlos geht es in „The Company of the Wain“ zu. Man kommt hierbei den unsauberen Umtrieben einer Handelskarawane auf die Spur, die im dünn besiedelten Eriador von Ort zu Ort zieht. Die Spieler könnten hierbei sogar Saruman zum ersten Mal auf die Schliche kommen, der steckt nämlich hinter dem Mummenschanz. Die Autoren setzen in The One Ring jedenfalls die Intrigen der Hauptakteure des Herrn der Ringe gut um, man fühlt sich als Teil einer lebendigen und sich fortentwickelnden Spielwelt.

Den Spionen kommt man am ehesten über ihre finsteren Geschäfte auf die Spur – ob sie nun Gandalfs Lieblingsfeuerwerker verschleppen wollen oder die misstrauische Gruppe in einem Dorf anschwärzen. Es gibt einiges zu entdecken und durchleben, und man hat als Spieler die Wahl des Vorgehens. Vor ein Dorfgericht mit der versammelten Bevölkerung gestellt zu werden ist jedenfalls eine erinnernswerte Begegnung. Auch das Ende bleibt offen – ob man die Unholde nun den Rangers of the North überlässt oder sie gar in zukünftigen Abenteuern wiederkehren, entscheidet sich im Spiel. Mit dieser Wahlfreiheit und flexiblen Einbindung in andere Storylines hebt sich „The Company of the Wain“ von den meisten Szenarien für The One Ring ab.

What Lies Beneath Ein Bestandteil von The One Ring ist, dass es ein stetiger Kampf ist, der verderbenden Wirkung des Schattens zu entkommen. Die Gruppe begleitet einen Ranger, der das alte Herrenhaus seiner Familie von Banditen befreien und zu einem Unterschlupf für Agenten des Lichts machen will. Leider ist der Gute dabei, das letzte Bisschen Verstand zu verlieren, weil ihn ein verwunschener Urahne heimsucht. Als wäre das nicht genug, entpuppen sich die „Banditen“ als Abenteurergruppe, die sich selbst einen Namen machen will. Diese Geschichte findet ihren dunklen Höhepunkt beinahe wie ein Kammerspiel, wenn alle zusammen in der Ruine übernachten...

Hier entscheidet die Wahlfreiheit der Spieler, wie schnell sie die Umstände durchschauen, wie geschickt sie mit NSC interagieren, und ob sie den Spuk beenden können, bevor zu viele Unschuldige sterben. Auch der SL ist stark gefordert, muss er doch überzeugend den Verrückten und alle anderen NSC so mimen, dass ihr Schicksal die Spieler auch wirklich berührt.

Shadows over Tyrn Gorthad Episch schließt der Band ab. Die Gruppe tut sich mit niemand Geringeren als Gandalf selbst zusammen. Die bösen Geister der Barrow Downs haben ihre Gefilde verlassen und bedrohen die umliegenden Lande, also das Auenland und Bree und auch die East Road. Der graue Magier braucht Informationen aus der entlegensten Ecke Angmars. Dort soll man so viel von den nekromantischen Flüchen des Hexenkönigs sammeln, wie man nur kann.

Wäre das nicht schon beschwerlich und gefährlich genug, sucht man jetzt noch Zusatzinformationen über die betroffene Region, bevor man zusammen mit Gandalf die Bannzauber in den Downs erneuert. Ein besonderes Schmankerl in dieser Phase ist sicherlich die Begegnung mit Tom Bombadil, der vielleicht nie die Ehre hatte, in den Filmen aufzutauchen, aber hier sicherlich einen tiefen Eindruck bei den Spielern hinterlassen wird.

Das Abenteuer zieht sich über mindestens zwei separate Spielphasen hinweg und endet mit einem epischen Gefecht, bei dem die Spieler Gandalf vor den andringenden Untoten schützen müssen. Schlaue Spielanlage und taktische Gewitztheit beeinflussen die Erfolgschancen hierbei entscheidend. Selbst wenn SC in dieser Phase sterben sollten, verbleibt doch das Gefühl, an einem zentralen Teil der Geschichte dieser Lande mitgewirkt zu haben. Spielgruppen haben zu diesem Zeitpunkt vielleicht schon 20 spielinterne Jahre auf dem Buckel, und die hart errungene Erfahrung können sie hier sicherlich brauchen.

Es menschelt

The One Ring wurde gelegentlich vorgeworfen, vorrangig eine „Wandersimulation“ zu sein. Tatsächlich nehmen sich die Regeln der langen Reisen durch Mittelerde ja auch an, und auch hier führen viele Abenteuer von Ort zu Ort auf beschwerlichen Wegen.

Mein Eindruck bei Ruins of the North ist aber, dass weder das Reisen noch die namensgebenden Ruinen den Hauptanteil des Bandes ausmachen, sondern die vielfältigen Interaktionen mit hervorragend ausgearbeiteten NSC! Die Abenteuer „Nightmares of Angmar“, „The Company of the Wain“ und „What Lies Beneath“ sind randvoll mit Personen, denen die SC begegnen können. Hier steckt viel Herzblut der Autoren drin.

Auch auf Seiten der Gegner mangelt es nicht an bemerkenswerten Figuren. Es gibt viele, die mit Namen und Beschreibung gut herausgearbeitet sind, und alle wichtigen Gegner und Begegnungen wirken sehr individuell und stimmig im Rahmen der Tolkienschen Welt. Auch hier wird durchaus mit Überraschungen aufgewartet.

Ein paar Elfen und Zwerge dürfen auftreten, doch zumeist sind es die Menschen Eriadors und manchmal auch Wilderlands, die hier auf die Bühne drängen. Direkt oder indirekt sind auch bedeutende Charaktere der Romane vertreten: Gandalf, Saruman, Bilbo, Glorfindel, Elrond und Tom Bombadil. Ihren gestiegenen Möglichkeiten entsprechend beginnen erfahrene Charaktere nun also wirklich, in die größeren Geschehnisse Mittelerdes einzugreifen. Der Schwerpunkt verlagert sich hierbei vom Hobbit zum Herrn der Ringe, obwohl das Ende des Ringkriegs noch ca. 40 Jahre (oder je nach Spielanlage noch mehr) in der Zukunft liegt. Kartographie: Fehlschlag ohne Sauron-Rune

Die Karten im Band hinterlassen bei mir gemischte Gefühle. Zum einen sind sie äußerst ansprechend gemacht und sehen einfach stimmungsvoll aus. Zum anderen ist ihre Nützlichkeit stark begrenzt.

Ein wenig Kritik ist hier durchaus angebracht: Keine der Karten hat einen Maßstab. Zwar ist The One Ring kein Spiel für Dungeon Crawling, aber die Karten stellen ja die jeweiligen Lokalitäten dar, die auch der SL seinen Spielern präsentieren muss. Das wird dadurch erschwert, dass die Karten zwar ohne Verschnörkelung auskommen, gerade aber Höhlen so verwinkelt und kunstvoll gezeichnet sind, dass der SL diese wohl kaum abpinseln kann. Vielleicht kann man sich hier noch mit Abdecken der Originalkarte behelfen, da diese Karten zumindest ohne beschreibenden Text auskommen.

Noch größer ist das Problem bei der Karte von Carn Dûm aus dem ersten Abenteuer. Diese ist zur Hälfte ein kunstvoll gemaltes Bild und zur Hälfte eine stilisierte Karte, die mit diesem Bild verschmilzt. Legt man den Spielern das Bild vor, vergibt man aber vielleicht wertvolle Hinweise, für die die Spieler eigentlich Arbeit investieren müssten, weil quer über das Bild bereits Nummern an wichtigen Stellen vergeben wurden. Eine übersichtliche Karte der Strukturen an der Oberfläche ist nicht mitgeliefert, ein Bild der Ruine ohne Hinweise und Kartenanteile fehlt auch. Vielleicht kann man den Spielern ja das (nicht identische) Bild aus dem Band Rivendell zeigen, um die richtige Stimmung zu vermitteln. Ich jedenfalls fände es sehr schwer, die Ruine meinen Spielern angemessen zu präsentieren. Das Ganze sieht toll aus, aber hier wurde am falschen Ende gespart. Eine Karte mehr oder die Abbildung alleine hätten hier einen großen Unterschied gemacht.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis

Wie bei anderen Büchern der Reihe ist das PDF mal wieder preislich zu hoch angesetzt gemessen an der Seitenzahl. Es lohnt sich hier entweder auf eine Preisreduktion in Form eines Sales auf RPGNow zu warten oder gleich das Hardcover im Rahmen des von Cubicle 7 unterstützten „Bits & Mortar“-Programms zu kaufen und das PDF gratis dazuzubekommen. Erhält man Print und PDF zusammen, erscheint mir der Preis angesichts des hochwertigen Produkts als gerechtfertigt. Erscheinungsbild

Seit The One Ring auf das Hardcoverformat umgestellt hat, sind die Bücher einfach nur wunderbar. Die Illustrationen sind ein Gedicht. Die Bücher haltbar und schön gestaltet. Die Schrift gut lesbar, der Textsatz angenehm für das Auge.

Bonus/Downloadcontent Nicht vorhanden. (Die digitale Version enthält die Karten Eriadors als Zusatz-PDF.)

Fazit

Nicht jeder traut sich zu, überzeugende Geschichten innerhalb des Kanons Mittelerdes ansiedeln zu können. Darum ist es auch so wahnsinnig wertvoll, dass die Autoren von Bänden wie diesem so ausgezeichnete Arbeit leisten und damit uns Spielleitern gutes Material an die Hand geben, mit dem wir arbeiten können.

Die Mischung macht's. Es wird gereist, erforscht, gekämpft und mit NSC und Gegnern interagiert. Dabei werden auch die Ecken erkundet, die Hobbit und Herr der Ringe eher nur streifen oder von denen man sogar nur andeutungsweise hört. Das ist spannend für Spieler und SL gleichermaßen.

Der Besitz des Schwesterbands Rivendell ist dringend anzuraten – zu oft wird querverwiesen. Diese einseitige Abhängigkeit gab es schon zwischen The Heart of the Wild and The Darkening of Mirkwood und sie wird sich auch bei Horse-lords of Rohan und Oaths of the Riddermark wiederholen.

Ruins of the North ist einfach nur gut. Es hat mich sofort in den Fingern gejuckt, es zu leiten! Es liest sich gut, es hat viele Facetten, es macht die Welt lebendig. Mit viel Gefühl für das Originalmaterial wurden auch zentrale Figuren des Herrn der Ringe eingebunden, und das Ganze wirkt wie aus einem Guss. Das ist sicherlich keine kleine Leistung!

Meine Empfehlung: Ohne Reue kaufen!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Jens P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/01/2015 04:29:34

I've finally read through Ruins of the North, and must say that I'm again impressed. It's living up to the high standards Cubicle7 has set itself: gorgeous artwork, atmospheric adventures. I especially like 'Concerning Archers', since it nicely picks up a stray reference in the LOTR appendices and turns it into a great story. And the final 'Shadows over Tyrn Gorthad' similarly combines well-researched Tolkien lore with lovely new ideas: it's really epic, and I like the open structure, which allows you to do your own list of tasks in order to influence the final outcome.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Andrew L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/27/2015 12:57:00

I've only looked at Ruins of the North briefly so far, but I like what I've seen. The suppliment provides a nice mix of adventures for TOR and it is already providing value to me in regards to a home-brewed adventure that I'm working on.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Katherine B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/27/2015 12:16:58

Ruins of the North is perfect for me, since I don't have a lot of extra time to write/design my own adventures. Even if you do, I think the ideas contained in the book would still be a fruitful source of inspiration! C7 is known for its excellent quality, and this is no exception. The art is gorgeous, and the adventures really help you take your adventures to the next level--both in experience level and in the desperate fight against the Shadow in Middle Earth. I am always impressed with how well C7 captures the feel of Middle Earth (something many other reviewers have noted before me), and this set of adventures is no exception. Gorgeous, I can't wait to play them!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by David R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/24/2015 10:02:53

"The One Ring" just keeps getting better and better.

In some ways "Ruins of the North" has TOR looking a little bit more like traditional RPGs: more dungeons, more treasure. But always with the elements that make TOR unique: the journeys, the social interactions, and most importantly that sense of being a very small person caught up in big events. And every adventure has twists and turns that will surprise even veteran gamers.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Ruins of the North
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Ian A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/23/2015 17:47:32

Ruins of the North (RotN) is another fine product from Cubicle 7's One Ring series. It has a set of six well detailed adventures for, well, probably experienced players. Each of the six adventures is organised into a series of chapters for a group to work through. This of course helps to offer a good point for a GM (Loremaster) to end a session of gaming. The series is very thought out for the group to progress through this part of Middle Earth. There are several different authors who have worked on different adventures - but the collection has a strong sense of coherence while also offering slightly different styles and scenarios to adventure through. This helps me because it means that it will be just varied enough to keep the players from falling into a routine (None of the "oh yeah, we do a meeting, get the basic plot, spot the clues and then run into increasing opposition until we stuff the Boss at the end of the level"). Instead the players will have to use a variety of approaches to make progress from scenario to scenario: you aren't going to get a stale deja-vu feeling - they won't succeed by trying & repeating what you did before.

Like all the products in this series the feel is right: the respect is right and the writing is right. Even on its own its a good read and food for the imagination.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Displaying 1 to 8 (of 8 reviews) Result Pages:  1 
Back
0 items
Powered by DriveThruRPG